Classic Works of Apologetics - Independence Day Orations Classic Works of Apologetics Online


Independence Day Orations

From the Declaration on July 4, 1776 to the present day, American Independence has been an annual celebration, recognized at municipal, state and national levels. This is an archive of orations celebrating the birth of the United States, and honoring God's role in its formation.

We also recommend the Fourth of July Celebrations Database and the digital collections at MU Libraries, University of Missouri, also here.

"But the Day is past. The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.

"You will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not. I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost Us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will tryumph in that Days Transaction, even altho We should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not."

-- John Adams to Abigail Adams, July 3, 1776 [second letter]. Philadelphia July 3d. 1776. From Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 4 May 16, 1776 - August 15, 1776.

Fourth of July. Vermont Chronicle, July 14, 1826. Acknowledging the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson on July 4, 1826.

See also What the Presidents did on the Fourth of July compiled by James Heintze.


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  • A Declaration of interdependence: commemoration in London in 1918 of the 4th of July, 1776: resolutions and Addresses at the Central-Hall, Westminster, with an introductin by George Haven Putnam. New York, [1918]. 32 pp. Also here.
    THE FIRST RESOLUTION CABLED FROM THE MEETING TO PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON, WHITE HOUSE, WASHINGTON, D. C.
    At this representative meeting of Anglo-Saxon fellowship, assembled at the Central Hall, Westminster, London, and presided over by the Right Honourable Viscount Bryce, O.M., the following resolution proposed by the Right Honourable Winston S. Churchill, and seconded by the Honourable A. Meighen, was carried with acclamation:--
    "This meeting of Anglo-Saxon Fellowship, assembled in London on July 4th, 1918, send to the President and people of the United States their heartfelt greetings on the 142nd anniversary of the declaration of American Independence.
    "They rejoice that the love of liberty and justice on which the American Nation was founded should in the present time of trial have united the whole English-speaking family in a brotherhood of arms. They congratulate the United States and Navy on the marvellous achievement involved in the safe transportation to the battlefields of Europe of the first million soldiers of the American Army. They affirm their devotion to the noble and righteous cause in which we are fighting and their faith that by the help of God a complete and lasting victory will be won for freedom and humanity."

  • Abbot, Daniel, 1777-1853. An Oration, delivered at Nashua Village, Dunstable, N.H. the Fourth of July, 1803 by Daniel Abbot. 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Adams, Charles Francis. An Oration delivered before the City Council and citizens of Boston in Faneuil Hall: on the sixty-seventh anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1843. Boston, 1843. 38 pp.
    "Let us rather go on in the narrow path of our duty, rigidly adhering to the right and trusting that the same God who looked with favor upon the honest exertions of our forefathers to benefit their country, posterity, and mankind, will not withdraw the light of his countenance from us whilst laboring to continue worthy to be called their sons."

  • Adams, Daniel, 1773-1864. Oration, pronounced at Leominster, July 4, 1804; in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence. By Daniel Adams, M.B. Published by request. 19, [5] pp. 21 cm.

  • Adams, George Washington. An Oration delivered at Quincy, on the fifth of July, 1824. Boston, 1824. 24 pp.
    "The Christian Revelation, that mild and beautiful religion, which has taught man his duties and his hopes, is the true source of human happiness. With its establishment commenced the course of improvement, which succeeding ages and wonderful events have carried onward to our own age and time. The contemplation of the steps by which it has advanced affords much matter of instructive thought, and many reasons for just admiration. America has done and is doing her share in the geat work and from the hour of the discovery up to the present moment has shown a proud example to the world."

  • Adams, John. John Adams to Abigail Adams, July 3, 1776 [second letter]. From Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 4 May 16, 1776 - August 15, 1776.

    Philadelphia July 3d. 1776 -- "Had a Declaration of Independency been made seven Months ago, it would have been attended with many great and glorious Effects. (1) We might before this Hour, have formed Alliances with foreign States. We should have mastered Quebec and been in Possession of Canada.... You will perhaps wonder, how such a Declaration would have influenced our Affairs, in Canada, but if I could write with Freedom I could easily convince you, that it would, and explain to you the manner how. Many Gentlemen in high Stations and of great Influence have been duped, by the ministerial Bubble of Commissioners to treat.... And in real, sincere Expectation of this Event, which they so fondly wished, they have been slow and languid, in promoting Measures for the Reduction of that Province. Others there are in the Colonies who really wished that our Enterprise in Canada would be defeated, that the Colonies might be brought into Danger and Distress between two Fires, and be thus induced to submit. Others really wished to defeat the Expedition to Canada, lest the Conquest of it, should elevate the Minds of the People too much to hearken to those Terms of Reconciliation which they believed would be offered Us. These jarring Views, Wishes and Designs, occasioned an opposition to many salutary Measures, which were proposed for the Support of that Expedition, and caused Obstructions, Embarrassments and studied Delays, which have finally, lost Us the Province.

    "All these Causes however in Conjunction would not have disappointed Us, if it had not been for a Misfortune, which could not be foreseen, and perhaps could not have been prevented, I mean thePrevalence of the small Pox among our Troops.... This fatal Pestilence compleated our Destruction. It is a Frown of Providence upon Us, which We ought to lay to heart. But on the other Hand, the Delay of this Declaration to this Time, has many great Advantages attending it. The Hopes of Reconciliation, which were fondly entertained by Multitudes of honest and well meaning tho weak and mistaken People, have been gradually and at last totally extinguished. Time has been given for the whole People, maturely to consider the great Question of Independence and to ripen their Judgments, dissipate their Fears, and allure their Hopes, by discussing it in News Papers and Pamphletts, by debating it, in Assemblies, Conventions, Committees of Safety and Inspection, in Town and County Meetings, as well as in private Conversations, so that the whole People in every Colony of the 13, have now adopted it, as their own Act. This will cement the Union, and avoid those Heats and perhaps Convulsions which might have been occasioned, by such a Declaration Six Months ago.

    "But the Day is past. The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.

    You will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not. I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost Us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will tryumph in that Days Transaction, even altho We should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not."(2)

    RC (MHi). Adams, Family Correspondence (Butterfield), 2:29-31.
    1 Suspension points in MS, here and below.
    2 For the provenance and publication history of this celebrated letter, see Adams, Family Correspondence (Butterfield), 2:31n.9.

  • Adams, John Greenleaf. Our country, and its claims upon us: an Oration delivered before the municipal authorities and citizens of Providence, July 4, 1863. Providence, 1863. 30 pp.
    "Our Revolutionary fathers appealed to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe as witness of the rectitude of their intentions in making their avowal before the world. We have accepted that avowal, and He who sitteth in the heavens will hold us responsible for a righteous adherence to it. And in this conviction, we may find the heart and strength we need through all this strife."

  • Adams, John Quincy. An Oration pronounced July 4th, 1793: at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1793. 19 pp.
    "AMERICANS! Such is the nature of the institution which again calls your attention to celebrate the establishment of your national independence. And surely since the creation of the heavenly orb which separated the day from the night, amid the unnumbered events which have diversified the history of the human race, none has ever occurred more highly deserving of celebration by every species of ceremonial, that can testify a sense of gratitude to the DEITY, and of happiness, derived from his transcendent favours."

  • Adams, John Quincy, President, U.S. An Address delivered at the request of a committee of the citizens of Washington: on the occasion of reading the Declaration of Independence, on the Fourth of July, 1821. Washington, 1821. 30 pp. Also here.
    "It will be acted o'er, fellow-citizens, but it can never be repeated. It stands, and must for ever stand, alone, a beacon on the summit of the mountain, to which all the inhabitants of the earth may turn their eyes for a genial and saving light till time shall be lost in eternity, and this globe itself dissolve, nor leave a wreck behind. It stands for ever, a light of admonition to the rulers of men, a light of salvation and redemption to the oppressed. So long as this planet shall be inhabited by human beings, so long as man shall be of social nature, so long as government shall be necessary to the great moral purposes of society, and so long as it shall be abused to the purposes of oppression, so long shall this Declaration hold out to the sovereign and to the subject the extent and the boundaries of their respective rights and duties, founded in the laws of nature, and of nature's God. Five and forty years have passed away since this Declaration was issued by our fathers; and here are we, fellow-citizens, assembled in the full enjoyment of its fruits, to bless the author of our being for the bounties of his providence, in casting our lot in this favored land; to remember with effusions of gratitude the sages who put forth, and the heroes who bled for the establishment of this Declaration and, by the communion of soul in the reperusal and hearing of this instrument, to renew the genuine Holy Alliance of its principles, to recognise them as eternal truths, and to pledge ourselves, and bind our posterity, to a faithful and undeviating adherence to them.
    ... "The Declaration of Independence pronounced the irrevocable decree of political separation, between the United States and their People on the one part, and the British King, Government and Nation on the other. It proclaimed the first principles on which civil government is founded, and derived from them the justification before Earth and Heaven, of this act of sovereignty: but it left the people of this Union collective and individual without organized Government. In contemplating this state of things, one of the profoundest of British statesmen, in an ecstacy of astonishment, exclaimed 'Anarchy is found tolerable!' But there was no Anarchy. From the day of the Declaration, the people of the North American Union and of its constituent States, were associated bodies of civilized men and Christians, in a state of nature; but not of Anarchy. They were bound by the laws of God, which they all, and by the laws of the Gospel, which they nearly all, acknowledged as the rules of their conduct."

  • Adams, John Quincy, President, U.S. An Oration Addressed to the citizens of the town of Quincy, on the Fourth of July, 1831, the fifty-fifth anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. Boston, 1831. 39 pp. Also here and here.
    "The Declaration of Independence was a manifesto issued to the world, by the delegates of thirteen distinct, but united colonies of Great Britain, in the name and behalf of their people. It was a united declaration. Their union preceded their independence; nor was their independence, nor has it ever since, been separable from their union. Their language is, "We the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress assembled, do, in the name and by the authority of the good PEOPLE of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare that these United Colonies, are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States." It was the act of one people. The Colonies are not named; their number is not designated; nor in the original Declaration, does it appear from which of the Colonies any one of the fifty-six Delegates by whom it was signed, had been deputed. They announced their constituents to the world as one people, and unitedly declared the Colonies to which they respectively belonged, united, free and independent states. The Declaration of Independence, therefore, was a proclamation to the world, not merely that the United Colonies had ceased to be dependencies of Great Britain, but that their people had bound themselves, before God, to a primitive social compact of union, freedom and independence.
    ... "In the history of the world, this was the first example of a self-constituted nation proclaiming to the rest of mankind the principles upon which it was associated, and deriving those principles from the laws of nature. It has sometimes been objected to the paper, that it deals too much in abstractions. But this was its characteristic excellence; for upon those abstractions hinged the justice of the cause. Without them, our revolution would have been but successful rebellion. Right, truth, justice, are all abstractions. The Divinity that stirs within the soul of man is abstraction. The Creator of the universe is a spirit, and all spiritual nature is abstraction. Happy would it be, could we answer with equal confidence another objection, not to the Declaration, but to the consistency of the people by whom it was proclaimed! Thrice happy, could the appeal to the Supreme Judge of the World for rectitude of intention, and with firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence for support, have been accompanied with an appeal equally bold to our own social institutions to illustrate the self-evident truths which we declared!"

  • Adams, John Quincy. An Oration delivered before the inhabitants of the town of Newburyport, at their request, on the sixty-first anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Newburyport [Mass.], [1837]. 68 pp. Also here.
    "Why is it that, next to the birthday of the Savior of the world, your most joyous and most venerated festival returns on this day [the Fourth of July]? Is it not that, in the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior? That it forms a leading event in the progress of the Gospel dispensation? Is it not that the Declaration of Independence first organized the social compact on the foundation of the Redeemer's mission upon earth? That it laid the cornerstone of human government upon the first precepts of Christianity??

  • Aiken, Solomon. An Oration delivered before the Republican citizens of Newburyport and its vicinity, July 4, 1810: being the thirty-fourth anniversary of ... Newburyport [Mass.]; ([Newburyport, Mass.]), 1810. 15 pp.
    "It is true of all the settlements, that God took them under his holy keeping. Though they were afflicted, they were not destroyed by the Savages. God multiplied them in all their sufferings, as He did the ancient Hebrews. And they, governming themselves in the form of a pure democracy, until their numbers required a representative one; and establishing their polity, both civil and religious, till they stood in that unparalleled attitude of prosperity, which excited the jealousy or avarice of the parent country, and which led to their endeavours to subjugate us by the force of arms. Then was particularly the time that God, our great protector, appeared in his majesty and strength, for our defence, and gave armies for our ransom. He appointed us a place, and gave us a name among the powers of the earth.
    "This auspicious day we celebrate; and what is more applicable to the performance thereof, than with hearts of gratitude, that we take a view of its superlative blessings? It dissolved and annihilated the strong chains of civil and religious tyranny which were forming for us. All our fellow citizens, the millions of this increasing and rising Nation, may, without fear of disfranchisement, publicly avow their religious faith; and without the shackles of human laws, worship God, in the manner their own consciences may dictate."

  • Aikens, Asa, 1788-1863. An Oration, pronounced before the Republican citizens of Windsor, on their celebration of the thirty sixth anniversary of American independence. By A. Aikens, Esq. [Three lines from Sha[kespeare]]. [2], 8 pp. 21 cm.

  • Alden, Augustus, 1780-1850. An Address, delivered at Augusta, on the thirty-fourth anniversary of American independence, July fourth, 1809. By Augustus Alden, Esq. 12 pp. 21 cm.

  • Alger, William Rounseville. The Genius and posture of America: an Oration delivered before the citizens of Boston, July 4, 1857. Boston, 1857. 52 pp. Also here.
    "If an individual who was cruel and selfish in his family, careless and fraudulent in his business, should go about urging the claims of domestic love and mercantile integrity, every one would say that he had perversely mistaken his vocation, that his real duty was to reduce right principles to practice in his own sphere. So with a nation: its first obligation, its very function, is to organize justice, freedom, and beneficence in its own laws and life; to plant liberty on its public hills, joy in its private valleys, holiness in its courts, and mercy in its highways. The nation that recklessly disregards that, tramples on the elements of ethics, insults mankind, and defies God. A genuine patriotism will, therefore, labor to destroy the wrong and build up the right in its country, for the same reason that a pure and undefiled religion visits the afflicted, and keeps itself unspotted from the world: namely, that that is the very essence of its being.
    "But, secondly, we must endeavor to establish national righteousness at home, because that is the only possible way of securing permanent success and prosperity. Without internal holiness--conformity to that rule of right which is the will of God, in its institutions, laws, character and conduct--no nation can long stand."
    ... "Now, let a different course be fully tested. Let us improve the unparalleled opportunity Providence has given us, to try the policy of peace and magnanimous example. From all mortal contests--in the name of righteousness--in the name of humanity--in the name of Christ--in the awful name of God--stand we aloof, henceforth, with clean hands! If our brethren of the old countries cannot gradually win democratic emancipation by ripening steps of reform, but are compelled to snatch the prize with violence, when, at length, the rising regiments of the populace strike, we shall best keep the laws of wisdom and right, and best subserve the real interests of the world, not by plunging into the murderous struggle, but by tilling our fields and tending our tasks, praying God to preside over the issue which we may not arbitrate, and when the last great tempest of revolution has passed, to span the Eastern firmament with a bright republican bow, like that which soars across our Western."

  • Allen, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Franklin). An Oration pronounced before the students at Brown University in the college chapel July 4, 1817, in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Providence [R.I.], 1817. 16 pp.
    "Liberty of conscience, which has ever been considered the dearest of all earthly blessings, and for which our forefathers left their homes, their friends, their native land, and for which they toiled and suffered and bled, is here guaranteed. When our Congress ratified that article, which says, 'Congress whall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof'-- they said to the people, 'we give you that freedom for which kingdoms have bled and empires been convulsed; we give you that freedom, which is denied all other nations.' It remains with you to preserve it."
    ... "The same principle which opened in America the path of religious freedom, opened in France the flood gates of infidelity.--But France was too vicious to enjoy the freedom here possessed, and too ignorant to preserve it. When religious freedom was proffered, she embraced infidelity. Not that infidelity, which merely denies the authority of divine revelation, but that which denies the existence of a God; that which denies the use of all religion, both natural and revealed; that which banishes from the human heart every virtuous and honorable principle, and renders man the vilest monster in creation.
    "Such was the infidelity which France embraced. And with such principles, wherever she advanced;--(no matter what form she assumed or under whose banner she moved;)--but wherever she advanced, rapine, devastation and destruction preceded, desolation and ruin followed; kingdoms, empires and republics bowed and trembled and crumbled at her approach. Under the dominion of this infidelity, we heard her with one breat renounce the laws of nature, and with the next deny the existence of a God; we saw her in one moment, subverting all those institutions of science, virtue and religion, which had for ages preserved mankind in a state of civilization, refinement and happiness, and in the next, bursting asunder those ties of social union, which connect the human family together, and dissolving those moral ligaments, which bind the soul of man to the throne of God. All the rapacity, barbarity and cruelty of ferocious beasts, united with all the malignity of infernal spirits, would never form a monster so inhuman, unnatural and tremendous, as Republican France, under the reign of infidel licentiousness."

  • Allen, David, Esq. An Oration delivered in the Brick Church in Lansingburgh, July 4th, 1809. By David Allen, Esq. [One line in Latin] 28 pp. 22 cm.

  • Allen, Diarca Howe. July fourth, 1761: An Historical Discourse in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the charter of Lebanon, N.H., delivered July Fourth, 1861 . Boston, 1862. 100 pp. Also here and here.
    "The character of these early settlers may be inferred, not only from the herculean labors they were obliged to undergo, in order to provide for themselves a home and support their families, but from the interest they manifested in education and religion.
    "It is a singular fact, and one well worthy of our notice, that the very first record of the town now extant is a vote passed May 13th, 1765, in respect to preaching in the town."
    ... "These, our fathers, had been accustomed for many years to an able and faithful ministry of the Word of God, under such men as Rev. Dr. Wheelock, pastor of the church of Lebanon, and Rev. Richard Salter, pastor of the church of Mansfield, Conn. They knew the value, to themselves and families, of the regular preaching of the Gospel on the Sabbath, and were ready to make any sacrifices to obtain it.
    ... "The century over which we have thus rapidly glanced has been one of the most remarkable of all the centuries of time. It has been emphatically a century of progress tnaugurated by the revolutionary war, it includes the whole of what history will record as the first period of American republican government,--its period of sturdy, vigorous youth, of rapid growth in territory, in wealth, in learning, in religion, in short, in all the elements of national greatness. It closes in the midst of a civil war, which is to inaugurate the period of its ripened manhood, demonstrating to the world that a government founded upon the will of an intelligent and God-fearing people, is at once the strongest and happiest government on earth, and sealing with the heart's blood of the children, the institutions of liberty for which the fathers suffered and died.
    "The period of old age, when even a government is ready to vanish away, will, I trust, never overtake our nation; but I believe, rather, that its growing brightness and strength will at length be lost in that prophetic day, when every nation and every man shall be free, and all men everywhere shall enjoy undisturbed what the Pilgrims found on the Rock of Plymouth, 'Freedom to worship God.'
    ... "The declaration of rights and the proclamation of independence made on the 4th of July, 1776, viewed in their connection with English and colonial history, and the subsequent establishment of a free and independent government, constitute one of the most momentous and significant events of civil history. The cause of freedom and of civilization there moved forward and entrenched themselves behind principles and institutions which, by the help of God, shall never be thrown down, but shall stand the imperishable bulwarks of liberty and the splendid monuments of a Christian civilization.
    ... "A train of events and a succession of causes ordered by Him 'who made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation,' prepared them to lay the foundations of the State on the secure basis of learning and religion. Bitter persecutions and a narrow inheritance of worldly blessings, had driven them to a profound meditation upon the government of God as revealed in his word, and to an earnest study of the import and teachings of history. The divine oracles and history taught them that absolute, hereditary rulers and privileged orders served rather to perpetuate abuses, than to conserve the welfare of society; that government and social institutions were not safe in their hands, even when guarded by the severest checks. They themselves were now entering upon scenes in which, if not they, their children would learn that the rightful source of power is, under God, the will of the governed; that the welfare of society can more safely be entrusted to the wisdom and discretion of an educated and moral people than to the hazards of birth under any form of kingly rule.
    "Royal families may degenerate; may become selfish and unscrupulous; may seek for personal ends in conflict with the public interest; or, if the worst does not happen, may be outstripped by the people in the march of ideas and intelligence, and then endless conflicts and sorrows will succeed. But when the people make and administer their own institutions, they are flexible, and advance or change to meet the shifting phases of society. Collisions are thus prevented, and freedom given to enterprise and thrift to multiply their resources."

  • Allen, Paul, 1775-1826. An Oration, delivered on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1806, in the Congregational meeting-house, in the east precinct of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. By Paul Allen, Esq. 16 pp. 21 cm.

  • Allen, Samuel C. (Samuel Clesson), 1772-1842. An Oration, delivered at Petersham, July 4, 1806, at the anniversary commemoration of American independence. By Samuel C. Allen. [Three lines from Sallust]. 15, [1] pp. 23 cm.

  • Allen, Samuel C. (Samuel Clesson), 1772-1842. An Oration, delivered at Greenfield, July 6, 1812: in commemoration of American independence; at the request of the Washington Benevolent Societies, of the county of Franklin. By Samuel C. Allen, Esq. 26 pp. 21 cm.

  • Allen, Thomas, 1743-1810. An Oration, delivered at Pittsfield, July 4, 1803, being the anniversary of the independence of the United States of America. By Thomas Allen, Jun. A.M. Published by the request of the committee. [Four lines from John Hancock]. 11, [1] pp. 21 cm.

  • Allen, William Stickney. An Oration, delivered in Newburyport, on the fifty-fourth anniversary of the declaration of American Independence. Newburyport [Mass.], 1830. 20 pp.
    "Never, on any country, opened visions more glorious than beckon us onward. To us are the means accorded of building up an empire, cemented by all the ennobling principles of our nature. Here may stretch over half a hemisphere a republic, whose march is on the high places of truth and virtue; of justice, purity and moderation; of all that elevates and adorns, that proudest name among the nations, a Christian State!"

  • Ames, Benjamin. An Oration, pronounced at Bath, in the district of Maine, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1808: in commemoration of the American Independence. Portland [Me.], 1808. 14 pp.
    "But our plain answer this--the God, in whom we trust, was our fathers' guardian; the goods we possess are the fruits of our own labour; and the liberties we enjoy are the natural rights of man."

  • Anderson, Alexander. Oration delivered on the 42d anniversary of American independence, in the Representatives' chamber in the city of Washington by Alexander Anderson. 1 broadside.

  • Anderson, Alexander. Oration delivered at the request of the citizens of Washington on the forty-second anniversary of American independence, in the Representatives' chamber in the city of Washington by Alexander Anderson. 22 pp.

  • Anderson, John E. An Oration, delivered in St. Paul's Church, Augusta, on the Fourth of July, eighteen hundred and one. Augusta [Ga.]: Printed by William J. Bunce, 1801. 23 pp. Oration preceded with opening prayer.
    "Here mankind adore the God of nature, in that form which conscience dictates;--no longer shook by the terrors of ecclesiastical fulmination, or startled by the flitting visions of mysterious fanatacism: his mind contemplates the wide scene of nature and is led through the immensity of the universe to nature's God.--Acknowledging no natural superior but the King of heaven, the heart of man swells with gratitude and benevolence;--rejoicing in existence and the gifts of nature, his soul is elevated with piety and joy: 'a virtuous independence is the fun which irradiates the morning of his day--warms its noon--tinges the serene evening with pleasing variety, and on the pillow of religous hope he sinks to repose, upon the bosom of Providence.'"

  • Anonymous. An Address delivered to the inhabitants of the township of Fairfield ... New Jersey, on the Fourth of July, 1808, in conformity with their previous appointment, and published in compliance with their request. 12 pp.

  • Anonymous. Fourth of July. Arrangements for the Federal celebration. 1 sheet ([1] p.) 22 x 24 cm.

  • Anonymous. Melancholy event at Fort Constitution, in Portsmouth harbour, on the Fourth of July, 1809, eight men were killed and a number wounded, by the burning of about three hundred wt. of gun-powder; upon which dreadful occasion the following lines were made. 1 sheet ([1] p.) ill. (relief cuts) 37 x 21 cm.

  • Anonymous. American independence. The approaching anniversary of American independence will be celebrated in this town by the friends and disciples of Washington.--A procession will be formed, and An Oration delivered on the occasion. ... 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Anonymous. The Bible Federalist or A brief exhibition of the divine system of mortality. As the only foundation of civil policy; and the alone guarantee of human liberty, social happiness, and the rights of man. In contrast with the miserable and destructive immoral systems of political infidelity. [Four lines from Exodus]. Number first. 45, [1] pp. 20 cm.

  • Anonymous. Independence. Come hail the day, ye sons of mirth, which gave your native country birth. 1 sheet ([1] p.) 28 x 12 cm.

  • Anonymous. American independence. The anniversary of American independence will be celebrated in this town, by the friends and disciples of Washington.--A procession will be formed, and An Oration delivered on the occasion. ... 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Anonymous. An Heroic Address for the Fourth of July, 1813, inscribed to the New-Jersey Washington Benevolent Society, in New-Brunswick by a member. 8 pp.

  • Anonymous. Fourth of July. Arrangements for the celebration of independence. 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Anonymous. Fourth of July 1819, arrangements adopted by the committees of the corporation & military association. 1 broadside c

  • Anthon, John. An Oration delivered before the Washington benevolent society and the Hamilton society in the city of New-York, on the fourth of July, 1812. New-York, 1812. 21 pp.
    "This war [of 1812], we, as good citizens, are bound to support, until we can destroy the evil, by removing our unprofitable servants from their trusts. Until then, may that God, who holds the scale suspended over the doubtful field, in mercy to the just, spare and protect our injured country."

  • Appleton, John. Oration delivered before the Democratic Republicans of Portland and vicinity, July 4, 1838. Portland [Me.], 1838. 16 pp.
    "The spirit of gain should not be the presiding genius of our community. The God we worship should be a nobler Deity than avarice."

  • Appleton, John Sparhawk, 1775-1824. Salem, June 26th, 1806. Sir, I am directed to inform you that on the Fourth of July next, there is to be a military celebration ... . 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Armstrong, John J. An Oration delivered at Flushing, Long Island, Fourth of July, 1862. New York, 1862. 24 pp. Also here.
    "In no delusion of national vanity, but with a feeling of profound gratitude to the God of our Fathers, for His protecting care in the past, let us indulge the hope that our country and her people have been selected, and are yet to be preserved, as the instruments for preparing and maturing much of good yet in reserve for the happiness of the human race. Great good has already been produced by the solemn proclamation of our principles, and much more by the illustration of our example.
    "Let us then invoke upon our efforts the blessing and guidance of that Almighty Being 'who is the Author of peace and the lover of concord,' and we shall then find order springing out of confusion, harmony evoked from discord, and years of freedom, prosperity and happiness in reserve for our now bleeding and distracted country."

  • Ashbridge, George. An Oration delivered before the New-York Typographical Society at their second anniversary, on the Fourth of July, 1811, by George Ashbridge. 28 pp.

  • Atkinson, William King. An Oration: delivered at Dover, New-Hampshire, on the fourth of July, 1791 : being the fiftieth anniversary of American Independence ... . Dover, N.H., 1791. 21 pp.
    "Their morals are of the first importance; let us remember that virtue makes a nation great. Without a solid foundation of honesty and virtue, 'tis impossible a youth, whatever accomplishments he may have, can ever discharge the duty he owes to himself, his country, or his GOD."
    ... "We should also view GOD, not only as the supreme director, and sovereign disposer of states and kingdoms, but should endeavour to view him in his whole providence, even in what we call the common events, and accidents of life. He is equally the father and friend of the whole creation and his paternal cares extend to all."

  • Atlee, Edwin P. (Edwin Pitt). An Address to the citizens of Philadelphia on the subject of slavery: delivered on the 4th of 7th month, (July), A. D. 1833. Philadelphia, 1833. 14 pp. Also here.

  • Austin, Daniel, 1793-1877. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1814. Being the thirty-eighth year of American independence; at the request of the Republican citizens of Portsmouth. By Daniel Austin, Jr. [Three lines of quotations] 23, [1] pp. 21 cm.

  • Austin, David, 1759-1831. A Discourse delivered on the Fourth of July, 1804 ..., by David Austin. 24 pp.

  • Austin, Ivers James. An Oration delivered by request of the city authorities before the citizens of Boston, on the sixty third anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1839. 34 pp. Also here and here.
    "The hand of God in our country, the tokens of his benignant purpose to protect and advance in it the interests of liberty and humanity, is a theme for whose details volumes would be required; the few paragraphs of an oration can only sketch the outline."

  • Austin, Jonathan Loring. An Oration delivered July 4, 1786: at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in celebration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, [1786]. 18 pp.
    "May that Almighty Being who setteth up one, and putteth down another, still vouchsafe to bless, prosper, and defend our country--and 'as religion is one of the best cements of society, the firmest prop of government, and the fairest ornament of both,' may we be zealous to maintain it, and to cultivate those virtues which exalt a nation." (Quote from The Elements of Moral Philosophy, in Three Books with a Brief Account of the Nature, Progress, and Origin of Philosophy, Book II, by David Fordyce, 1754.)

  • Austin, James Trecothick. An Oration, pronounced at Lexington, Mass., in commemoration of the Independence of the United States of America, and the restoration of peace. Boston, 1815. 21 pp.
    "Nor even then did the energies of the country give assurance of success. It required faith in the justice of the cause--a dependence on the providential and almost miraculous interposition of that Almighty Being, who, as he once led his chosen people from the task-masters of Egypt, was able to carry his American Israel through the waves and wilderness of revolution and to place them in the Canaan of Independence and Peace."
    ... "Great GOD! We thank thee. Thou hast changed the scene. To thee we owe our deliverance. GOD of the Fathers, thou hast been the GOD of the Children."

  • Austin, James Trecothick. An Oration, delivered on the Fourth of July, 1829, at the celebration of American Independence, in the city of Boston. Boston, 1829. 25 pp. Also here.
    "A People, satisfied with hereditary honor, might repose on the large inheritance derived from the fathers of the American revolution. Providence assigned to them a duty of immeasurable interest, and endowed them with feelings, manners and principles for its successful accomplishment.
    "In their adventurous courage chivalry revived again; and the armies of liberty rivalled in glory the soldiers of tlie cross. Their self devotion repeated the examples of apostolic zeal in a cause almost as holy, and joined in kindred veneration the martyrs of freedom and the evangelists of faith. Their country combined and concentrated every motive of action, and enforced the obedience of their souls, even when she seemed to require them, like the Patriarch of Israel, to bind their own children on the altar of patriotism, and with their own hands to offer an oblation dearer than life.
    "But the declaration of national independence?their enduring claim on the gratitude of posterity and the admiration of mankind?is not to be considered as the commencement of American liberty. More justice is due to the earlier settlers of Massachusetts, and more liberality to the country whence they sprang.
    "Our ancestors came here freemen, and by the blessing of God neither they nor their posterity ever were slaves."

  • Austin, Samuel. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, on the Fourth of July, 1798: the anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. Worcester, 1798. 38 pp.
    "For our will to be FREE; our public and solemn declaration that we would be so, a declaration, founded in principle, the effect of necessity, and utterly irrevocable, was, under God, the guarantee of our freedom."

  • Austin, Samuel. An Address, pronounced in Worcester, (Mass.) on the Fourth of July, 1825, being the forty-ninth anniversary of the Independence of the United States, Before an Assembly Convened for the Purpose of Celebrating this Event Religiously. Worcester, [1825?]. 23 pp.
    "I cannot but suggest, in the first place, as an important religious truth, and as the basis of every other consideration pertaining to it, that it was not a casual, but a providential, event. It did not properly originate in, and result from, the contingent volitions of men. The Declaration of our Independence was indeed the deliberate act of the population of the country, in the persons of their representatives; and we will never cease to honour those men, for their uncommon intelligence, wisdom, and fortitude. We believe there seldom, if ever, was collected so much personal merit in any preceding deliberative assembly convened for a nation's political salvation.--We believe that the combined energy with which the declaration was supported was becoming its nature, and singularly efficacious. But we devoutly and gratefully acknowledge the hand of God in this event. He inspired the noble resolution, and his stretched-out arm brought it to its desired result. In acknowledging this, we mean to acknowledge more than that common agency by which all things subsist, by which the laws of nature go forward, the seasons revolve, and human life is sustained. There are certainly special providences, providences in which the hand of God is conspicuously seen, in which his power, and wisdom, and goodness, and faithfulness are eminently illustrated and glorified, and which, in an uncommon manner, and on special grounds, demand our profound attention and the tribute of our praise."

  • Avery, Joseph, 1751-1824. An Oration, delivered at Holden, July 4, 1806; being the anniversary of the independence of the United States of America. By Joseph Avery. 12 pp. 22 cm.


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  • Bache, Richard, 1784-1848. Oration, delivered at Spring Garden, July 5, 1813, to a very numerous and respectable company of Democratic Republicans, of the city and county of Philadelphia by Richard Bache. 7 pp. 21 cm.

  • Bacon, Ezekiel. An Oration, delivered at Williamstown, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1801. Pittsfield [Mass.]: Printed by Phinehas Allen, [1801] 16 pp.
    "And is not this an event upon which the philanthropist may reflect with gladness, and the pious with gratitude and adoration?--Is it not a subject of the highest congratulation to the Christian Patriot, the object of whose wishes is at length accomplished, and whose unceasing prayers for the destruction of this anti-christian hierarchy have been answered by the Ruler of the Universe, in infinite Wisdom and Benevolence?"

  • Bacon, Ezekiel. An Oration delivered at Pittsfield on the thirty-first anniversary of American Independence, July 4th, 1807. Pittsfield [Mass.], 1807. 23 pp.
    "IMPELLED uniformly by a spirit of civil and political Liberty, and guided by sentiments of Religion, which though at times beclouded by the mists of bigotry and fanaticism, were in their nature tolerant and mild, the enterprizing genius of our ancestors, burst from the restraints of domestic tyranny at home, and forced their passage through the accumulated difficulties which embittered their pilgrimage abroad."

  • Bacon, Ezekiel, 1776-1870. An Address, delivered before the Republican citizens of Berkshire, assembled at Pittsfield, to celebrate the thirty-fourth anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1810. By Ezekiel Bacon. [Four lines of verse] 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Bailey, Jeremiah, 1773-1853. An Oration, pronounced at Wiscasset, on the Fourth of July, 1805, by Jere. Bailey. 19 pp. 24 cm.

  • Baldwin, Simeon. An Oration pronounced before the citizens of New-Haven, July 4th, 1788: in commemoration of the Declaration of Independence and establisment [sic] of the Constitution of the United States of America. New-Haven, 1788. 16 pp.
    "Liberty was the darling object of the first settlers of this country. Animated with the hope of enjoying those civil and religious rights, which Heaven designed for the virtuous, they bade adieu to the joys of a more social life, and, surrounded with the horrors of death in a thousand different shapes, they took possession of the fair territory we now inhabit. In the anticipation of liberty, plenty and peace, they braved all dangers and all hardships."
    ... "Reflection would have thrown us into despair; and indeed, 'if the Lord himself had not been on our side when men rose up against us, they had swallowed us up quick.'
    "In this critical moment the Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled, boldly cut the gordian knot. In the name of the people, they 'assumed that separate and equal station among the powers of the earth, to which the laws of nature and nature's God, entitled them.' While we celebrate that distinguished day, the clear manifestation of pprovidential beneficence in this event, calls for gratitude and joy. the world confess'd it nobly done, and Heaven has ratified the deed."

  • Ballou, Adin. The Voice of Duty: an Address delivered at the anti-slavery picnic at Westminster, Mass., July 4, 1843. Hopedale, Milford, Mass., 1843. 11 pp. Also here.
    "It is usual for our fourth of July orators to glorify liberty as the especial birthright of American white men--while they overlook the condition of American colored men. to denounce British slavery, oppression and tyranny--while they are silent concerning American slavery, oppression and tyranny. To flatter their own countrymen with bombastic encomiums on their devotion to liberty, and the excellence of their republican institutions, instead of faithfully reproving them for their systematic violations of all their professsed principles. It is time to be ashamed to this self-glorification, and to consider that an ounce of genuine reform is better than tons of panegyric."

  • Ballou, Hosea, 1771-1852. An Oration pronounced at the Meeting House in Hartland, on the Fourth of July, 1807. Randolph, Vt.: Printed by Sereno Wright, 1807. 24 pp.

  • Ballou, Hosea, 1771-1852. A sermon delivered at the Second Universalist Meeting, in Boston, on the afternoon of the fourth Sabbath in July, 1818. By Hosea Ballou, pastor. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Bancroft, Aaron, 1755-1839. Importance of education, illustrated in An Oration, delivered before the trustees, preceptors & students of Leicester Academy, on the Fourth of July, 1806; at opening of a new building for the use of that seminary. By Rev. Aaron Bancroft. Published by request of the corporation. 20 pp. 23 cm.

  • Bancroft, George, 1800-1891. An Oration delivered on the fourth of July, 1826, at Northampton, Mass. Northampton, 1826. 25 pp. Also here with introduction by David Barton and biography of Bancroft.
    "Our act of celebration begins with God. To the eternal Providence--on Which states depend and by Whose infinite mercy they are prospered--the nation brings its homage and the tribute of its gratitude. From the omnipotent Power Who dwells in the unclouded serenity of being without variableness or shadow of change [James 1:17], we proceed as from the Fountain of Good, the Author of Hope, and the Source of Order and Justice, now that we assemble to commemorate the revolution, the independence, and the advancement of our country!
    "No sentiments should be encouraged on this occasion but those of patriotism and philanthropy. When the names of our venerated fathers were affixed to the instrument which declared our independence, an impulse and confidence were imparted to all efforts at improvement throughout the world. The festival which we keep is the festival of freedom itself--it belongs not to us only but to man. All the nations of the earth have an interest in it, and humanity proclaims it sacred!
    "In the name of LIBERTY, therefore, I bid you welcome to the celebration of its jubilee; in the name of our COUNTRY, I bid you welcome to the recollection of its glories and joy in its prosperity; in the name of HUMANITY, I welcome you to a festival which commemorates an improvement in the social condition; in the name of RELIGION, I welcome you to a profession of the principles of public justice which emanate directly from God! These principles are eternal not only in their truth but in their efficacy [effectiveness]. The world has never been entirely without witnesses to them; they have been safely transmitted through the succession of generations; they have survived the revolutions of individual states and their final success has never been despaired of. Liberty has its foundation in human nature and some portion of it exists wherever there is a sense of honor. Are proofs of its existence demanded?"

  • Bancroft, George, 1800-1891. An Oration delivered before the democracy of Springfield and neighboring towns: July 4, 1836. Springfield [Mass.], 1836. 39 pp.
    "Gratitude to God becomes the citizens of a free republic. Thanks be to that Providence which overrules the destinies of states, and has crowned our happy country with its richest blessings."
    ... "Our fathers proclaimed the principles of democracy; but did not create them. They were coeval with the first conception of order in the divine mind; and are as pervading and as extensive as moral existence. Like Christianity, and like all moral principles, they are eternal in their truth and in their obligation.
    "The principles of democracy, imbodied in the Declaration of Independence, were but the manifesto of a system which, in the divine mind, was as old as creation."

  • Bangs, Edward. An Oration, delivered at Worcester, on the Fourth of July, 1791: being the anniversary of the Independence of the United States. Printed at Worcester, Massachusetts, 1791. 15 pp.
    "O HAPPY United States! rejoice, and be not unmindful of your gratitude to Heaven on this auspicious day: For on this day ye were freed from participating the perpetual quarrels and wars of Europe; where men are forever troubled by the folly, the pride, and the avarice of kinds."

  • Bangs, Edward D. An Oration on the anniversary of American Independence, pronounced at Worcester, July 4, 1800. Worcester, July, 1800. 28 pp.
    "Form institutions in memory of your WASHINGTON--Follow him in the political course; and forget not that he was a follower also in the Christian."

  • Bangs, Edward D. (Edward Dillingham), 1790-1838. An Oration, delivered July 4th, 1805, at Worcester, before the Social Club, in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. By Edward D. Bangs. 11, [1] pp. 1917 cm.

  • Bangs, Edward D. (Edward Dillingham), 1790-1838. An Oration, pronounced at Sutton, Massachusetts, July 5th, 1813, in commemoration of American Independence. By Edward D. Bangs, Esq. Published by request. 16 pp. 24 cm.

  • Bangs, Edward D. (Edward Dillingham). An Oration pronounced at Springfield, Mass., on the Fourth of July, 1823: being the forty seventh anniversary of the Declaration of American Independence. Springfield, 1823. 16 pp.
    "Our religion still blesses us with its holy institutions and influences; nor are its altars yet domolished, nor its temples desecrated by infidelity, which it was pretended was in strict alliance with republicanism!"

  • Banister, William Bostwick. An Oration, delivered at Newburyport on the 34th anniversary of American Independence: at the request of the inhabitants of said town. Newburyport, 1809. 20 pp.
    "And as we thankfully rejoice in exemption from the caprice, and tyranny of power, let us carefully cultivate those habits, and virtues, and that religion, which are so essential to that freedom which we justly, and gratefully boast."

  • Baptist Church (Stamford, Conn.). Centennial services of the Stamford Baptist Church: including the Historical Discourse by Rev. Edward Lathrop, D.D., pastor of the Church, November 6, 1873. Stamford, Conn., 1875. 68 pp.
    "The word toleration, now so complacently enunciated by some is not found in our church vocabulary. We tolerate nobody. We regard toleration, in matters of religion, as a modified form of tyranny. It implies the right to prohibit and to coerce. This right we deny: and we proclaim, as the Scriptures do, not toleration, but the liberty--the right of every man to worship God according to the dictate of his own conscience."
    ... "It is but historically just, however, to say that the Baptists have been always and uncompromisingly the apostles and champions of the liberty, both civil and religious, which all now recognize as the crowning glory of our national constitution.
    "It was the practical advocacy of these principles which led General Washington, when President, to say of the Baptists: --'I recollect with satisfaction that the religious society of which you are members, have been throughout America, uniformly and almost unanimoously the friends of civil liberty, and the persevering promoters of our glorious Revolution.'"

  • Barbour, B. Johnson (Benjamin Johnson). An Address delivered before the Literary Societies of the Virginia Military Institute: at Lexington, on the 4th of July, 1854. Richmond, 1854. 31 pp.
    "Individualism, I repeat, is the characteristic of all true freedom, whether civil or religious. I do not, of course, use this word in that selfish sense which would make the interests of individuals superior to the common interests of society--but in that higher sense which shall make each member of a community feel that under Divine Providence he has a work to perform--some greater, some less. The parable which tells us of the distribution of the talents, shows us in the very inequality of the distribution, that it is to individual energy we must look for the greatest achievements."

  • Barker, David. An Address in commemoration of the Independence of the United States: delivered at Rochester, July 4, 1828. Dover, [N.H.], 1828. 28 pp. Also here.
    "You all know that the first settlers of New-England were induced to leave their native country in search of religious freedom. They belonged to the sect of Puritans, dissenters from the established church of England. Influenced by a spirit of intolerance, almost universal in that day, which, in the present age, a more enlightened reason has corrected, the government of their own country prohibited to them the free exercise of their religion. For this they encountered the perils of the sea, which were great in the then imperfect state of navigation, the inconveniences of settlement in a wild and uncultivated country, and the terrors of famine and of the savage.
    ... "Such was the situation of the New-England colonies and the character of the inhabitants, at the period when the parent country claimed to exercise the power of levying taxes and duties upon them without their consent. The exercise of that authority was resisted, not so much for the reason that any immediately oppressive burden was endeavored to be imposed, as for the declaration of a principle of government, which, in time to come, might limit the measure of taxation only by the ability of the people to contribute. It is clear that such a principle, if admitted, would have reduced this country to the condition of a Roman province, to be plundered at the sovereign will of King and Parliament, and to minister with its resources to all their multiplied schemes of ambition. But, thanks be to Heaven, there were sagacious spirits in that day, who discovered the cloud in the horizon,when it was no larger than a man's hand who did not wail until it had overspread the whole Heavens with its threatening ruin. Yes, my fellow citizens, there was Hancock, the Adamses, Franklin, Henry, Jefferson, and Lee, who could snuff the approach of despotism in the tainted breeze and meet it fearlessly in whatever questionable shape it might come."

  • Barker, James Nelson, 1784-1858. An Oration, delivered at Philadelphia Vauxhall Gardens, on the forty-first anniversary of American independence. By James N. Barker. (Published by request of the meeting.) 11, [1] pp. 20 cm.

  • Barker, Joseph. An Address to a respectable number of citizens, from several towns in Plymouth County: convened in Halifax, July 4th, 1803, to celebrate the Anniversary of American Independence. Boston, [1803]. 15 pp.
    "To maintain this independency, and defend the liberties of our country, we were obliged, under great disadvantages, to carry on a war of eight years, expensive of blood and treasure. Many of the amiable sons of America resigned up their lives in defence of the liberties of their bleeding country. But our zeal for liberty, and spirited exertions, by the smiles of a benign Providence, forced at length our unnatural enemy, after having sacrificed many thousands of their brave soldiers, (who were worthy of dying in a better cause) and greatly increased their enormous national debt, to acknowledge our independence, and give over their fruitless war."
    ..."But let not our present prosperity put us off our guard. Let us always be attentive to our elections, and take care that men of principle, and republican principles, fill our State and Federal Legislatures. Let us see that our government be kept purely republican, that is, a representative democracy. This is a duty, which we owe to our fathers and brethren, who paid their blood to purchase our privileges. It is a duty which we owe to posterity; we ought not willingly, or carelessly, deprive them of that goodly heritage, which God has committed to our keeping."

  • Barlow, Joel. An Oration, delivered at the North church in Hartford, at the meeting of the Connecticut society of the Cincinnati, July 4th, 1787: in commemoration of the Independence of the United States. Hartford, [1787]. 20 pp.
    "Here was a people thinly scattered over an extensive territory, lords of the soil on which they trod, commanding a prodigious length of coast and an equal breadth of frontier--a people habituated to liberty, professing a mild and benevolent religion, and highly advanced in science and civilization. To conduct such a people in a revolution, the address must be made to reason as well as to the passions. And to reason, to the clear understanding of these variously affected colonies the solemn address was made."

  • Barlow, Joel. Oration delivered at Washington, July fourth, 1809: at the request of the Democratic citizens of the District of Columbia. Washington City, 1809. 14 pp.
    "To prepare the United States to act the distinguished part that providence has assigned them, it is necessary to convince them that the means are within their power. A familiar knowledge of the means will teach us how to employ them in the attainment of the end. Knowledge will lead to wisdom; and wisdom in no small degree is requisite in the conduct of affairs so momentous and so new."

  • Barnard, Daniel D. (Daniel Dewey). An Oration, delivered before the honorable the corporation and the military and civic societies of the city of Albany, on the fourth of July, 1835. Albany, 1835. 50 pp.
    "If it was then announced that the form of government under which they had lived had become destructive of the proper ends of government, an intention was at the same time intimated to institute a new government, with its powers organized in such a form as should seem to them most likely to effect their safety and happiness. If their purpose was then announced of assuming a separate and equal station among the nations of the earth, they did at the same time announce to the world, as the very point from which the frame of their government should take its rise, a new principle, which, at least for centuries, had not been recognized even as an admitted truth, and which had never been regarded as an indispensable element in the structure of a state--That principle was 'that all men are created equal.'
    "I do not mean to say that this truth itself was then first published to the world. As a natural truth it resulted from the order of creation by which the family of man took descent from a single pair. As a religious truth it was proclaimed by Moses and the Prophets, and authoritatively taught in the mission of Jesus Christ. But as a political truth--as a truth which challenged the homage of every man, and of which every man who was the subject of a social compact might claim the benefit--as a truth which struck with palsy the right arm of human power over the human subject, by a broad challenge to the various pretences on which that power had been set up and exercised--and above all, as a truth which was to be the corner-stone of a great political edifice, now to be erected for the first time on such a principle--the announcement was new--new in its terms, new in its import, and new in the application that was to be made of it."

  • Barnes, Thomas, 1749-1816. An Oration delivered at Freeport, on the 4th of July, 1807, being the anniversary of American Independence by Thomas Barns [i.e. Barnes]. 12 pp.

  • Barnett, John, 1753-1837. An Oration, delivered at Amenia ... July 4, 1812, to an assemblage of citizens, met to celebrate the birth of our republic by John Barnet. 24 pp.

  • Barnwell, Robert, 1761-1814. An Oration delivered before the Philomathean Society and inhabitants of Beaufort, South-Carolina, on Monday, July 4 , 1803. by Robert Barnwell. Charleston [S.C.]: Printed by John J. Evans & Co., 1803. 32 pp.

  • Barrows, William, 1784-1821. An Oration, pronounced at Fryeburg, Maine, on the 4th day of July, 1812, [at th]e request of the Federal Republicans [of] Fryeburg and the adjacent towns by William Barrows, Jun. 20 pp. 21 cm.

  • Barstow, George. War the only means of preserving our nationality: an Oration, delivered at San Jose, Santa Clara County, Cal., July 4, 1864. San Francisco, 1864. 15 pp. Also here.
    "After the example of our fathers, the illustrious founders of the Republic, let us turn our thoughts to war, as the only means of preserving that liberty which was born in '76.
    "It is clear that the problem of the rebellion must be solved by the sword. It is the patriotic resolve of the people of the United States to contend, in spite of every sacrifice, for the maintenance of that noble Government which embodies the hopes of the free throughout the civilized world.
    "Of all the spectacles presented to our view, through the telescope of history, there is none so sublime as that of a great nation contending for its existence, against foes who act upon the atrocious maxim that success in villainy is a justification of it."

  • Bartlet, Cosam E. (Cosam Emire), 1794-1850. An Oration pronounced before the Franklin Society and a respectable assembly of citizens, in the city of Hartford, 4th July, 1816, by Cosam E. Bartlet. 12 pp.

  • Bartlett, Elisha. An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities and the citizens of Lowell, July 4, 1848. Lowell [Mass.], 1848. 38 pp.
    "In the third place, we have shown, that the highest of all human interests, those of religion, are most positively secured, and most efficiently promoted, by separating it wholly from the state, and leaving it, so far as the state is concerned, entirely to itself. The patronage of government is only a fetter on its free limbs, and poison in its veins. I am not speaking of religious freedom and toleration merely. The outrageous and impertinent tyranny of an enforced conformity to certain prescribed forms and dogmas--that atrocious violation of the most sacred rights and instincts of the human soul--we long ago resisted and cast off. I am not speaking of this, but of that later-discovered truth, that God is sufficient for himself; that the progress of His kingdom upon the earth is not advanced but hindered by the direct interference of human governments; that the relations between Him and His creatures are multiplied, and strengthened, and drawn closer, when they are left to arrange themselves in spontaneous obedience to His laws, and not under the coercion of ours."

  • Bartlett, Ichabod, 1786-1853. An Oration, pronounced at Salisbury, New-Hampshire, July 4th, 1808. By Ichabod Bartlett. [Five lines of verse] 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Bartlett, Joseph, 1762-1827. An Oration, delivered at Biddeford, on the Fourth of July, 1805, by Joseph Bartlett. 16 pp.

  • Bartlett, Joseph, 1762-1827. An Oration, delivered at the request of the Republican citizens of Portsmouth, N.H. on the Fourth July, MDCCCIX. By Joseph Bartlett. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Barton, Cyrus. An Address, delivered before the Republicans of Newport, and vicinity, July 4, 1828. Newport [N.H.], 1828. 16 pp.
    "The causes which led to the great event of our national birth, are eloquently set forth in the Declaration of Independence. It was freedom founded in principle for which our fathers contended: It was the substance and not the shadow of liberty, for which they hazarded their lives; and this should be held in perpetual remembrance by their sons.
    "But the love of POWER is a principle implanted in the human breast; and unless guarded by constitutional barriers, and the vigilance of the people, is liable, in its exercise to great abuse."

  • Bassett, Francis. An Oration delivered on Monday the fifth of July, 1824: in commemoration of American Independence: before the supreme executive of the Commonwealth, and the City Council and Inhabitants of the City of Boston. Boston, 1824. 23 pp.
    "The general tranquillity which now prevails in the political world, has given rise to a more full discussion of the principles of free government. In no country are these principles better understood than in our own, and in no country is civil and religious liberty so extensively enjoyed. In the midst of public prosperity it is not less a duty, than a pleasure, on this occasion, to recur to the origin of our nation, and to trace the causes to which, under Providence, we are indebted for such distinguished blessings."

  • Bates, Barnabas, 1785-1853. A Discourse, delivered to the inhabitants of Bristol, (R. I.) assembled to celebrate the anniversary of American Independence, Tuesday, 4th July, 1815. By Barnabas Bates, A.M. Pastor of the First Baptist Church in said town. 19, [1] pp. 25 cm.

  • Bates, Isaac C. (Isaac Chapman). An Oration pronounced at Northampton, July 4, 1805, the twenty-ninth anniversary of American Independence: at the request of the committee of Arrangement. Northampton [Mass.], 1805. 31 pp.
    "THOUGH, at present, we enjoy all the blessings, which liberty and law, can give or secure, yet let us remember, that the wheel of fortune rolls; that the celebration of Independence to-day, is no proof that we shall enjoy it to-morrow."

  • Baylies, Francis, 1783-1852. An Oration, pronounced at Dighton (Massachusetts) July 4, 1806. By Francis Baylies. Published at the request of a committee of the audience. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Baylies, Francis. An Address before the members of the Taunton Lyceum: delivered July 4, 1831. Boston, 1831. 37 pp. Also here.
    "Our Chief Magistrate shall be elected, we will have no hereditary Legislator. The idea that a man is born a Legislator is absurd. The Teachers of Religion shall trust to Providence for support, and not to tythes and sinecures. Shall the Dignitaries of the Church be permitted to live in Palaces and to revel in wealth and luxury, when the Author of our religion had not where to lay his head? The people are sovereign, and they shall exercise their sovereignty -- they shall rule -- and rule they will."

  • Baylies, William, 1743-1826. An Oration, pronounced at Middleborough, (Mass.) at a meeting of the Federal Republicans, of the county of Plymouth, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1808. By William Baylies. 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Beedé, Thomas. An Oration delivered at Roxbury July 4, 1799: in commemoration of American Independence. Boston, 1799. 13 pp.
    "With regard to civil liberty, we enjoy as much of it as is consistent with human nature. We have a happy constitution; framed by the hands of wisdom and experience, which guarantees the sacred rights of the people. Our government is inferior to none on earth. It encourages found morality and pure religion. It breathes compassion towards deluded offenders, while it punishes with rigorous severity the wilfully vicious. It has spirit to resent foreign impositions, and energy to supprefs domestic outrage. It is administered by men whom the people can trust; men of sagacity and discretion; men of eminence and respectability; men of sound principle and of tried patriotism.
    "Are we not contented and happy with these distinguished privileges? Not perfectly so. Ambitious; unprincipled foreigners have viewed and envied our tranquility. These have injudiciously been invited to come and dwell among us. They have come, and have brought their vices and their prejudices with them. They have excited jealousy, and sown division and discord among our honest citizens. Through this medium has been introduced a licentious philosophy; the principles of which eventually tend to destroy social and individual happiness. A philosophy denying our holy religion; denying divine revelation, denying the existence of God and a future state. A philosophy dissolving the tenderest of human connections, breaking down family distinction; confounding systems; freeing men from the obligation of oaths, and reducing the beautiful inequality of nature to a dead level, whose loathsome exhalations are pregnant with pestilence and death.
    "These disorganizing principles in the vitals of our country are more to be dreaded, than millions of external open enemies."

  • Beedé, Thomas, 1771-1848. An Oration delivered at Wilton, New Hampshire, July 4, 1809 ..., by Thomas Beede. 16 pp.

  • Belknap, Jeremy, 1744-1798. Psalm LXXV. Long metre. Power of government from God alone. Dr. Watt's version. Altered and applied to the American Revolution. Boston: [s.n., 1803] 1 broadside.

  • Bell, Luther V. (Luther Vose). An Address before the Young Men's Entire Abstinence Association: Derry, N.H., July 4, 1832. Concord [N.H.], 1832. 21 pp.
    "It may with truth be said, that almost all the brilliant results of modern times, whether regarded in a scientific, a moral, or a religious point of view, owe their impetus and their progress to a combination of effort."

  • Bennett, Benjamin. An Anniversary Address: Delivered at Middletown-Point Church, on Monday the fifth of July, 1802, to the inhabitants of that place, and its vicinity, on the subject of American independence, with inferences from that event. New York: Printed by [G.?] Forman, 1802. 22 pp.
    Thus, also, on occasions of extraordinary joy, recognizing the great Jehovah as the fountain of all happiness, and ruler of all worlds, the heart dilates. with sentiments of gratitude and affection, and awfully adores the wisdom, power, and beneficence of the Creator. Much, therefore, of that portion of happiness, for which we have any foundation to hope, in the present and future state of things, depends on the established belief in that leading truth, the existence and controul of a superintending providence, and a careful observance of the ways of God to man.

  • Bennett, Joseph. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1808. Before the inhabitants of New-Bedford, in commemoration of the thirty-second anniversary of American Independence. By Joseph Bennett, A.M. [Five lines from Horace] 15, [1] pp. 21 cm.

  • Berrian, Samuel, d. 1819. An Oration, delivered before the Tammany Society, or Columbian Order, Hiberian Provident, Columbian, and Shipwright's societies, in the city of New-York, on the fourth day of July, 1815. By Samuel Berrian, Esq. Published by request of the general committee of arrangements, and the Hiberian Provident Society. 32 pp. 24 cm.

  • Berrian, Samuel. An Oration, delivered before the Tammany society, or, Columbian order, Tailor's, Cooper's, Hibernian provident, Shipwright's, Columbian, Manhattan, and Cordwainer's Societies, in the City of New-York, on the Fourth of July, 1811. New-York, 1811. 24 pp.
    "Why did our brave and pious forefathers quit the land of their nativity, and the tombs of their sires, to seek a distant home, amid the bleak and barren shores of a desolate wilderness? It was to enjoy in repose and safety their religion, their liberties, and lives."

  • Berrien, John MacPherson, 1781-1856. An Oration, commemorative of the anniversary of American Independence. Delivered at the Baptist Church in Savannah, by Col. John Macpherson Berrien, on the Fourth of July, 1808. At the request of a committee of citizens. 23, [1] pp. 21 cm.

  • Biddle, James Cornell. An Address delivered before the Philomathean and Phrenakosmian societies of Pennsylvania college. Gettysburg, 1838. 30 pp. Also here and here.
    "Liberty is inseparably connected with the moral and intellectual improvement of mankind. It is a theme on which historians, philosophers, poets, and orators, have delighted to dwell. Its true nature and character have often been lost sight of in the halo of its effulgence. It consists not in permitting all to indulge their passions and gratify their inclinations, without control. Such a state of society never did, and could not long exist. Different persons desire the possession of the same thing; that which pleases one, displeases another; all cannot be gratified; some will prevail, others must yield. If there were no permanent rules for the government of the community, the strong would overwhelm the weak; the cunning would circumvent the simple-minded; and wrong would often prevail over right. No tyranny was ever more arbitrary, no despotism ever more cruel, than man left entirely to himself. Every one the judge and vindicator of his own rights; the redresser of his own wrongs; society would be convulsed by perpetual violence.
    "If men were not mortal; if all were in sincerity and in practice Christians, seeking to do the will of their Creator; and every one to do unto others as he would they should do unto him; then indeed might mankind live in security, under no other than a self-imposed restraint."

  • Biddle, Nicholas. Oration delivered before the Pennsylvania state Society of Cincinnati, on the fourth of July, MDCCCXI. Philadelphia, 1811. 26 pp.
    "WE are assembled, fellow citizens, to commemorate the birth of our republic. A great and powerful people, who from this era date their independence, are now uniting with us in grateful remembrance of its blessings, and renewing on the altars of their country the sacred offerings of patriotism."
    ... "Animated by our example, that France, who once pitied our misfortunes, strove also to be free; but it was only the impotent fury of a maniac struggling with his chains. In the dark hour of her bloody anarchy, there did seem to be a dawning brightness; and our hopes mistook the transient gleam of arms for the sober rays of freedom. It dazzled for a moment like the bewildering lights that glitter over the corruption which feeds them; and then a night of far deeper gloom closed on the fairest prospects of human nature."

  • Bidwell, Barnabas, 1763-1833. A summary, historical and political review of the Revolution, the Constitution and government of the United States: An Oration, delivered at Sheffield, July 4th, 1805. By the Hon. Barnabas Bidwell, Esq. 22 pp. 20 cm.

  • Bigelow, Abijah, 1775-1860. An Oration, delivered at Bolton, July 4, 1808. By Abijah Bigelow, counsellor at law. [Two lines of quotation] Published by request. 16 pp. 25 cm.

  • Bigelow, Andrew, 1795-1877. An Oration, delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society at Cambridge, July 4, 1815. By Andrew Bigelow, A.B. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Bigelow, Lewis, 1785-1838. An Oration, pronounced at Templeton, July 5, 1813, in commemoration of the thirty seventh anniversary of American independence, before the Washington benevolent societies in the northern section of the county of Worcester, and other citizens. By Lewis Bigelow. 28 pp. 22 cm.

  • Bigelow, Timothy (b. 1825). An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1853: Together with the speeches at the dinner in Faneuil Hall, on that Occasion. Boston, 1853. 76 pp. Also here.

  • Billings, John. Oration pronounced the Fourth of July, 1808, before a company of young ... citizens of Portsmouth ... by John Billings. 12 pp.

  • Binns, John (1772-1860). An Oration commemorative of the birth-day of American Independence, delivered before the Democratic societies of the city and county of Philadelphia, on the 4th of July, 1810. Philadelphia, 1810. 10 pp.

  • Bisbee, Noah, 1781-1814. An Oration, delivered in the Second Baptist Church, in Newport, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1805, by Noah Bisbee, Jun. 42 pp. 22 cm.

  • Bisbee, Noah, 1781-1814. An Oration, delivered in the Baptist Meeting-House, in Richmond, N.H. on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1806, by Noah Bisbee, Jun. [Five lines from Warren]. 23, [1] pp. 19 cm.

  • Blake, Francis. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, (Mass.) on the thirty-sixth anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1812. Worcester, [1812]. 36 pp.

  • Blake, George. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1795, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, 1795. 26 pp.

  • Blydenburgh, Samuel. An Oration written for the celebration at Springfield, on the 35th anniversary of American independence. But which owing to a misunderstanding in the arrangements, was not delivered. By Samuel Blydenburgh. 26 pp. 21 cm.

  • Blyth, Stephen Cleveland, b. 1771. Ode for the military celebration at Salem of the Fourth of July, 1806. By S.C. Blyth. Tune, "To Anacreon in Heav'n." 1 sheet ([1] p.) ill.

  • Boardman, Charles A. (Charles Adolphus). The Agency of God illustrated in the achievement of the Independence of the United States: a Sermon, delivered at New-Preston, Connecticut, July ... New-Haven, 1826. 26 pp.

  • Bodman, Manoah, 1765-1850. An Oration, delivered at Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, July 4, 1803 by Noah Bodman, Esquire. Northampton [Mass.]: Printed for the author, 1803. 1 broadside.

  • Bodman, Noah. An Oration Delivered at Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, July 4, 1803. Northampton, 1803. Broadside.

  • Boies, Patrick. An Oration pronounced at Blandford on the 4th of July, 1814: before the Blandford and Granville branches of the "Washington Benevolent Society ... Springfield [Mass.], [1814]. 18 pp.

  • Bokee, David A. Oration delivered by Hon. David A. Bokee, in the First Baptist church, Brooklyn, July 4th, 1851 on the occasion of the seventy-sixth anniversary of Our National Independence. Brooklyn, 1851. 10 pp.
    "Our country, fellow citizens, has seen many dark days and trying crisis; but through the goodness of an All-wise Providence, she has thus far passed safely through them, and like a gallant vessel escaping from the breakers, and sperading her canvas to the favoring breeze, has bounded on in her great and prosperous voyage."

  • Bolles, John Augustus. An Oration, delivered before the inhabitants of Winchester, Mass. July 4, 1860. Boston, 1860. 19 pp.

  • Bond, Thomas. An Oration, delivered at Hallowell, the fifth day of July, 1802 (the fourth being Sunday), in celebration of the anniversary of American independence. Augusta, District of Maine: Printed by Peter Edes, 1802. 23 pp.

  • Boston. Independence. Order of performance, at the Third Baptist Meeting-House, in Boston, on the anniversary of American independence, July fourth, 1808. [Boston]: Snelling & Simons, [1808.] 1 broadside.

  • Boston. Independence. Order of performance, at the Brick Chapel, Bromfield's Lane, Boston, on the anniversary of American independence, July fourth, 1809.. [Boston: s.n., 1809] 1 broadside.

  • Boston. Order of exercises at the municipal celebration of the thirty-fourth anniversary of American independence ... at the Old South Church Boston. 4 pp.

  • Boston. The Eighty-second anniversary of American Independence: being a full report of the events of the day in the city of Boston, together with the Events of the Day in the City of Boston. Boston, 1858. 125 pp. Also here.

  • Boudinot, Elias. An Oration, delivered at Elizabeth-town, New-Jersey, agreeably to a resolution of the state Society of Cincinnati, on the Fourth of July, M.DCC.XCIII. Being the seventeenth anniversary of the independence of America. / By Elias Boudinot, L.L.D.; [Three lines in Latin from Lactantius] Elizabeth-Town [N.J.] Printed by Shepard Kollock, at his printing-office and book-store, 1793. 34 pp.
    "Do you, my worthy fellow-citizens of every description, wish for more lasting matter of pleasure and satisfaction in contemplating the great events brought to your minds this day? Extend, then, your views to a distant period of future time. Look forward a few years, and behold our extended forests (now a pathless wilderness) converted into fruitful fields and busy towns. Take into view the pleasing shores of our immense lakes, united to the Atlantic States by a thousand winding canals, and beautified with rising cities, crowded with innumerable peaceful fleets, transporting the rich produce from one coast to another.
    "Add to all this, what must most please every humane and benevolent mind, the ample provision thus made by the God of all flesh for the reception of the nations of the earth, flying from the tyranny and oppression of the despots of the Old World,* and say, if the prophecies of ancient times are not hastening to a fulfillment, when this wilderness shall blossom as a rose the heathen be given to the Great Redeemer, as his inheritance, and these uttermost parts of the earth for his possession.
    "Who knows but the country for which we have fought and bled may hereafter become a theatre of greater events than yet have been known to mankind.
    "May these invigorating prospects lead us to the exercise of every virtue, religious, moral, and political. May we be roused to a circumspect conduct to an exact obedience to the laws of our own making to the preservation of the spirit and principles of our truly invaluable constitution to respect and attention to magistrates of our own choice; and, finally, by our example as well as precept, add to the real happiness of our fellow-men, and the particular glory of our common country.
    "And may these great principles, in the end, become instrumental in bringing about that happy state of the world, when, from every human breast, joined by the grand chorus of the skies, shall arise with the profoundest reverence, that divinely celestial anthem of universal praise 'Glory to God in the highest--Peace on earth--Good will towards men.'"

    * It is worthy the attention of every serious mind, who carefully traces the secret footsteps of Divine Providence, that if the late Revolution had not taken place, and America had still continued under the dominion of Great Britain, the unhappy sufferers in the cause of Freedom, both in Europe and the West Indies, would not now have had a spot on tlie globe to which they could, with propriety and safety, have retired, in case of a failure of their exertions in favor of Universal Liberty. Neither can any European nation afford so complete an asylum as the United States for the opposition, in case they should finally be driven from a country which might conceive itself essentially injured by their hostile conduct in the day of her distress.

  • Bourdeaux, Isaac. An Oration, pronounced July the fourth, MDCCCIII, at the request of the Barnwell Revolution Society, at Barnwell Court House, in commmemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Isaac Bourdeaux. 29 pp.

  • Bouton, Nathaniel. Christian Patriotism: an Address delivered at Concord, July the fourth, 1825. Concord [N.H.], 1825. 23 pp.
    "Let us welcome this day with gratitude to God. next to the landing of the Pilgrims on the rock at Plymouth, it forms an era in our history, which must ever awaken the most interesting associations. The public acknowledgment of the Divine agency in the affairs of nations, is a dictate both of reason and religion; for it is still true that Jehovah 'ruleth among the nations,' and that, 'that people only is happy, whose God is the Lord.'
    "But in our case, the recognition of the Divine hand in all that distinguishes us, is peculiarly proper. 'No people,' said Washington, 'can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible Hand which conducts the affairs of men, more than the people of these United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of Providential agency.'"
    ... "We will then on this day ascribe thanksgiving to God. He fitted our fathers for the work, which they accomplished by suffering, and blood, and prayer. Their character is drawn on the face of our Government, and their spirit diffused through all our institutions. The Constitution which they adopted, would not have suited Greece nor Rome in their happiest days; it is inapplicable to any state in Europe, because the intelligence and virtue of the people are insufficient to support it. France once attempted in imitation of our example, to mould herself into a Republic--but she fell into anarcy; was convulsed and torn asunder by the fury of her own elements, and was saved from utter ruin, only by welcoming back and placing on the throne her 'legitimate sovereign.' Give our Constitution to Spain, just as she is, and probably for a time it would be worse for her than the folly, jealousy and tyranny of Ferdinand, and the tortures and fires of the Inquisition. The civil liberty which we enjoy, you cannot yet impart to the brave and noble-minded Greeks, nor to the patriots of the South. Bolivar, the Washington of South-America, when consulting on a Government for the people, whose liberties he has been instrumental of achieving, declared that the successful operation of our constitution for so many years, is a miracle, and that at present it is wholly unsuited to them. had he better known the character of our fathers, he would not have pronounced the success of our government a miracle; but it does show the influence of religion. It proclaims to the nations while they look on and wonder, 'Happy is that people, whose God is the Lord.'--at the same time it teaches us to respond, 'Not unto us, not unto us. O Lord, but unto thy name give glory.' To Him we offer our gratitude. Let it ascend pure from the altar of every heart. Happy, might it thus arise while the loud salutations of the morning echo along our coasts and plains, and reverberate among our hills and mountains; happy, if in every part of the nation, patriots should be seeen crowding into the sanctuaries publicly to celebrate God's goodness; happy, if the thousands of voices echoing on this glad day from every quarter of the land, might mingle in one loud anthem, and ascend up to Heaven.
    "Here it is proper to remark on the connexion between Religion and Patriotism, and to show how they may be united in the same breast."

  • Boynton, Thomas J. Oration: delivered at Key West, Florida, July 4th, 1861. Key West [Fla.], 1861. 19 pp. Also here (limited).
    CHRISTIAN FRIENDS AND FELLOW CITIZENS--
    "LET us welcome this day with gratitude to God. Next to the landing of the Pilgrims on the rock at Plymouth, it forms an era in our history, which must ever awaken the most interesting associations. The public acknowledgment of the Divine agency in the affairs of nations, is a dictate both of reason and religion; for it is still true, that Jehovah 'ruleth among the nations,' and that 'people only is happy, whose God is the Lord.'
    "But in our case, the recognition of the Divine hand in all that distinguishes us, is peculiarly proper. 'No people,' said Washington, 'can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand which conducts the affairs of men, more than the people of these United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of Providential agency.'"

  • Bowen, Nathaniel, 1779-1839. An Oration, delivered in Providence, on the fifth of July, 1802, in commemoration of American independence. By the Rev. Nathaniel Bowen. 20 pp. 22 cm.

  • Boyd, Adam, 1738-1803. [Sermon delivered in commemoration of American independence]. 16 pp.

  • Brackett, James. Oration pronounced in the chapel, Dartmouth College, on the Fourth of July, 1805: being the twenty-ninth anniversary of American Independence. Hanover [N.H.], [1805]. 12 pp.
    "May our country, as she was first visited by the celestial influences of pure liberty, be the last asylum from the chill blasts of tyranny and oppression. May peace, honorable peace, attend our country, and plenty our habitations. In fine, may the God of our fathers, 'who drove out the heathen before them,' and planted them in this land of promise, of liberty,l and of happiness, ever watch over us for good, and for prosperity, and for glory."

  • Brackett, Joseph Warren, 1775-1826. An Oration delivered July fourth, 1810, before the Washington Benevolent Society, and the Hamilton Society, of the city of New-York. By J.W. Brackett. [Three lines from Washington] Published by request. 16 pp. 21 cm.

  • Bradford, Alden, 1765-1843. An Oration, pronounced at Wiscasset, on the Fourth of July, 1804, in commemoration of American independence. By Alden Bradford. 19, [1] pp. 22 cm.

  • Bradford, Alden, 1765-1843. An Oration delivered at Wiscasset, July fourth, A.D. 1808; the anniversary of American independence. By Alden Bradford, Esq. 20 pp. 24 cm.

  • Bradley, Micah, 1781-1815. An Oration, pronounced July 5th, 1813, at the request of the Republicans of the town of Portsmouth, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence. By Micah Bradley, Esq. 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Bragdon, Joseph H. A Report of the proceedings on the occasion of the reception of the sons of Newburyport resident abroad: July 4th, 1854, by the city authorities and the citizens of Newburyport. Newburyport [Mass.]; (Newburyport), 1854. 116 pp. Also here and here.
    "In these later days we are quite too much in the habit of identifying religion only with the sentiments and tastes. We practically dissociate it from its political and social relations; we isolate its influences from those connections, in which in the wisdom of God it was intended to exert some of its highest and holiest benefactions. But we much mistake the secret of that energy of will and purpose, that activity in deed, that early respectability which we are proud to commemorate it our local history. I say we much mistake the secret power of these, if after all, they were not the product of the Puritan piety. When Macaulay depicts the grand lineaments of the Puritan in the political strifes of the seventeenth century, he draws the features of that same spirit as the vital ingredient of gaccess in every other relation. When in burning and glowing rhetoric be says of them, that 'they were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplation of superior beings and eternal interests,' he no more surely touches the key-note of their triumph over despotism at home, than he traces out the peculiar source of the success of like minds in more peaceful walks. That same eve which could look calmly upon the stormy battle, because it had first looked upward to God; that same heart which quailed not amid the hurricane of the charge, because it was at peace with its Maker, these were the same, which in civil and social aspect, were distinguished for a precision of view, a coolness of judgment, and an inmutability of purpose 'which some have thought inconsistent with religion, but which were in fact the necessary effects of it.'
    "And although we may not always be able to connect our own ancestry directly with the Puritan of the commonwealth, yet there is a marvellous likeness stamped upon their character and habits. There is the same acknowledgement of God in the ascription of every event to His will; there is the same subjection of every impulse of mind and heart, to the one over-powering sentiment of God, and duty to him; there is the same idea of a practical, present, ever-judging God as the grand arbiter of every act, and the truest bond of every social and domestic institution."

  • Braman, Isaac, 1770-1858. "The union of all honest men." An Oration, delivered at Rowley, west parish, July 4th, 1805. By Isaac Braman, A.M. [One line from Washington]. 19, [1] pp. 21 cm.

  • Brazer, Samuel, 1785-1823. An Oration, pronounced at Springfield, on July 4th, 1809, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence. By Samuel Brazer, Jun. Esq. 20 pp. 21 cm.

  • Brazer, Samuel, 1785-1823. An Oration, pronounced at Charlton, Mass. in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1811. By Samuel Brazer, Jr. Published by request. 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Brazer, Samuel, Jr. Oration, pronounced at Lancaster, July 4, 1806, in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Worcester [Mass.], July 1806. 24 pp.
    "Exiled from their native shores by priestly oppression, our ancestors committed themselves to the bosom of an almost untried ocean, braved the inclement howlings of wintry storms, and having passed the perils of the sea, reached their wished assylum, only to encounter perils more numerous and more dreadful. Yet they patiently endured them. For though their bodies were pinched with cold and famine, their immortal part was unenthralled. They communed with their God, in conformity, not with the mandates of his usurping vicegerents, but with the dictates of their own minds."

  • Bridgham, Samuel Willard. An Oration, delivered in the Benevolent Congregational meeting-house in Providence, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1798, in commemoration of American Independence. Providence, 1798. 12 pp.
    "The tree of liberty, planted by the hand of GOD himself, cherished by our ancestors, and watered with their blood--that tree wose branches shade the Union, has invited the oppressed from all quarters of rthe globe, and with them some turbulent and factions spirits, who never can rest under any government, have been admitted. 'Hinc ille maili labes'--hence part of our misfortunes--they are not only admitted, but join our public councils. Such is the incautious benignity of our laws!"

  • Briggs, George W. (George Ware). Two Sermons preached in the First Church in Plymouth, Mass.: Sunday, July 4, 1847. Plymouth [Mass.], [1847?]. 28 pp.
    "Two themes are suggested by the associations of the hour. This day, is marked in the nation's history. The memorials of the world's great sacrifice are before our eyes. Thoughts of our Country follow us, while we think of our Redeemer. But I remember that a pure patriotism glowed in the Saviour's breast as a perpetual fire; leading him to speak first to Judea, in the unfolding of his Gospel, through his own, or his disciples'lips, filling him with special sadness at his people's sin; and the two themes are in perfect harmony."

  • Brooks, John. An Oration delivered to the Society of the Cincinnati in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, July 4th 1787. Boston, 1787. 16 pp.
    "Support the majesty of the laws of your country. Reverence the publick institutions of religion. Practice the whole circle of private virtues; and disseminate, to the utmost of your power, the seeds of useful knowledge."

  • Brown, Asa, 1787-1858. An Oration, on the anniversary of American independence. Pronounced at Buxton, District of Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1808. By Asa Brown. 12 pp.

  • Brown, Frederick Thomas. An Address delivered in the Central Presbyterian church, Chicago, July 4th, 1865. Chicago, 1865. 25 pp. Also here.
    And is there not something sublime, something almost divine, in the sight of a people who have suffered as this people have, and who still sorrow, and still most sorrow, spontaneously, without proclamation, as if moved by one common impulse, rising up to give thanks to Almighty God, and then sitting down at his feet and saying, 'Our Heavenly Father, teach us by this sore discipline to be wiser and better children than we were before. Teach us to love truth, mercy, and justice. Teach us to follow thee more closely, to obey thee more implicitly, to see thee more clearly, to love thee more truly. Teach us to feel and to reverence our common brotherhood as thy children, and to look not every one on his own things, but every one also on the things of others?' To me it seems so. And I thank God that lie has put it into the hearts of the American people to make this Fourth of July a great Feast Day of joy, gratitude and thanksgiving: not by Presidential proclamation, now that our chieftain sleeps, but by the motion of his own Spirit."

  • Browning, Orville Hickman. An Oration delivered by Hon. O. H. Browning: on the occasion of the celebration of the eighty-seventh anniversary of our National Independence. Quincy, Ill., 1863. 21 pp.
    "About a century and a half preceding that memorable day, a few feeble, but heroic Colonies fled from the despotisms of the Old World, to seek refuge in the New, from the oppressions and persecutions which they could no longer bear. They disembarked upon the Atlantic coast, where their humble settlements made scarcely perceptible specks along its margin. They were but a few hundreds, and now, wonderful to relate, they have grown into more millions than they were hundreds then. "They fled to the wilderness from political oppression and religious persecution, bringing with them the simple, earnest, and unaffected devotion to the principles of civil and religious liberty which sustained them in their self-expatriation, cheered them under the hardships of it perilous Voyage, and strengthened them for conflict with the greater dangers, and sufferings which awaited them on a desert shore. "They came in humble and reverential dependence upon God for guidance, and protection-took possession of the land in His name -- conformed their laws and institutions to what they believed to be His will -- habitually invoked His paternal care, and rendered grateful acknowledgment for all the blessings bestowed upon them."

  • Brownson, Orestes Augustus. An Address delivered at Dedham on the fifty-eighth anniversary of American Independence: July 4, 1834. Dedham [Mass.], 1834. 24 pp.

  • Brownson, Orestes Augustus. Oration before the democracy of Worcester and vicinity, delivered at Worcester, Mass., July 4, 1840. Boston; Worcester, 1840. 38 pp.

  • Bryant, Samuel. An Oration delivered at Mount Aaron in West Dedham: July 4, 1839: by invitation of citizens of West Dedham, Walpole, and Dover. 2nd ed. [Dedham, Mass.], 1839. 15 pp.

  • Buchanan, Archibald. An Oration, composed and delivered at the request of the Republican society of Baltimore, on the Fourth of July, one thousand seven hundred and ... Baltimore, 1795. 42 pp.

  • Buchanan, Archibald. An Oration, composed and delivered at the request of the Republican Society of Baltimore, on the Fourth of July, one thousand seven hundred and ... . Baltimore, M,DCC,XCV. [1795]. 42 pp.

  • Buell, William Samuel. An Oration, delivered at Orange County, N.Y., on the Fourth of July, 1814 ..., by William Samuel Buell. 20 pp.

  • Bugbee, Samuel, 1781-1841. An Oration, pronounced at Wrentham, July 4, 1803; in celebration of the twenty-seventh anniversary of American independence. By Samuel Bugbee, Jun. 16 pp. ill. 23 cm.

  • Bull, Epaphras W. An Oration, delivered at Danbury on the Fourth of July, 1801 , in commemoration of our national independence. Danbury [Conn.]: Printed by Nichols & Rowe, 1801. 16 pp.; 22 cm.
    A great body of people actuated by different motives, interests and feelings will not at all times act in conformity with right, without some tie or compulsion. Hence laws are made for the observance of civil obligation, but laws are but feeble barriers against long rooted habits of vice. It becomes necessary then for a nation which values its prosperity to instil into the minds of its subjects independent of all restraint some ruling principles of action. Morality and Religion are those principles which must establish permanent security and permanent happiness. As in private so in public life vice contaminates the essence of very good. As immorality by slow degrees destroys the individual, in the same manner does it undermine the public. As morality adds to the peace of one so it must to all, as it constitutes the contenment of domestic life so it is ithe true foundation of public happiness. the man who disregards the rights of individuals weill neglect the public good, and will sacrifice it when interfering wihit his private interest. He who regards not his own character, will not regard the dignity of his country, and he wil will plunge himself into infamy will not care to uphold a falling country but add his weight to accelerate its ruin. His elevation is marked by the demoralization of man, his example a poison to society. "What is relgion but a belief in something higher, more powerful, more living then visible human nature and a perfect conformity to that superior Being?" What is morality but upright conduct as to ourselves and mankind? Will the man who regards not himself, his neighbor or his god, become a good member of society, will he hadd stability to a good government or his exertions exceed the narrow confines of a selfish spirit? Can it be said of him who contems all religion as a farce, that he will not hold in disdain all social obligation?

  • Burges, Tristam. An Oration, delivered in the Baptist meeting-house, in Providence, on the Fourth of July, 1801, in commemoration of American independence. Providence: Printed and sold by John Carter, 1801. 22 pp.; 24 cm.
    I trust in God, the hour of danger will never find one of this assembly lingering in his country's defence, because he has not been told the story of her former sufferings in the cause of freedom. Liberty is of value, intrinsic, unlimited and immortal. Who can calculate its worth?

  • Burges, Tristam, 1770-1853. Liberty, glory, and union, or American independence: An Oration, pronounced before the people of Providence, July 4th, A.D. 1810. By Tristam Burges, Esq.. 22 pp. 23 cm.

  • Burnap, Jacob, 1748-1821. An Oration, delivered at Dunstable, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1808. By Jacob Burnap, A.M. minister of Merrimac. Published at the request of the audience. 13, [1] pp. 23 cm.

  • Burnham, John, 1780-1826. An Oration pronounced at Hillsborough, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1810, the anniversary of American independence. By John Burnham, A.B. [Two lines of quotations] 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Burrill, George Rawson. An Oration, delivered in the Benevolent Congregational meeting-house, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1797, in commemoration of American Independence. Providence, 1797. 19 pp.

  • Burton, Asa, 1752-1836. A sermon, delivered at the installation of St. John's Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, in Thetford, Vermont, July 4, 1816. By Asa Burton, D.D. Pastor of the Church of Christ in Thetford. Published at the united request of the Masons assembled on the occasion. 22 pp. 21 cm.

  • Busteed, Richard. An Oration, delivered at Huntington, L.I., New-York. New-York, 1862. 20 pp. Also here.
    "While I will obey and faithfully observe all that the Constitution of my country requires, I yet wish the supreme law to be founded on the principles of God's eternal justice, and to square with His golden rule. I desire that the law of might shall be the law of right."

  • Butler, Mann. An Oration on National Independence, (delivered by public request,) on the Fourth of July, 1837, at Port Gibson, Mississippi, consisting, principally, of a sketch of the rise of the State of Mississippi, from the exploration of De Soto, in 1539, to the present time. Frankfort, Ky., 1837. 22 pp.
    "AFTER the gratitude, so righteously due to the Supreme Disposer of events, for the flood of happiness poured upon our country, by its Independence, let us enquire how we can best commemorate this noble deed of our ancestors. How can we best improve this most merciful dispensation of Divine Providence, so as to perpetuate its blessings of Liberty and Independence?"
    ... "But how shall we best guard against this calamity and disgrace? By cultivating in our own hearts, and impressing upon our children and all within our influence, a profound and practical reverence for a divine, religious influence, which shall govern our passions and liberalize our selfishness. No people were ever long free, or deserved to be so, who neglected the great duties of religion, of justice and mercy between man and man. The birth place of freedom, the most sacred altar of her worship, is the domestic fireside and the relations of every day life. The man whose spirit does not freely and generously prompt him to perform all the noble duties of private life, of neighbor and friend, is unfit to be a freeman. The liberties of no nation can be secure but under responsiblity to God for their thoughts and most secret actions. All other foundation is sand and stubble. The privileges enjoyed under a free government, the tempting prizes offered to ambition, even honorable ambition, that 'last infirmity of noble minds,' the fierce collisions and competitions inevitably engendered in public pursuits, call imperatively and solemnly, in such a government, above all others, for the restaints [sic] of rational, genuine religion. I mean not one of mere dogmas, articles of faith, or ritews and ceremonies; but one of 'peace on earth and good will to man'--of responsibility to God in another state of existence, for our actions in this life--such a religion as preached and practised by Jesus Christ. This life and all its glorious opportunities and capacities must be built upon another, a better, and never dying one. When our condition in an immortal state of being, is familiarly dependent, in our convictions, as a necessary and inevitable consequence, upon our conduct in this world, upon our tastes and our moral habits formed here, then indeed the liberties of society are under the guardianship of God. And as astronomers say, the earth could never have been measuured without a previous knowledge of the stars, so the happiness of the earth can only be secured by its dependence on Heaven. Jealousy of the public liberty, no profuse confidence in any men, or yet in any mere written instruments framed for securing public freedom and happiness, are essential to a republic. Neither demagogues, however brilliant their services may have been, nor instruments of government, are the proper securities of a free people. they must be their own guardians, or their dependence upon others will be but the stepping stone to their slavery. To discharge the duties of an American freeman, in a manner worthy of his high vocation, requires stores of moral and intellectual light. Every step he takes, every opinion of men and things which he may form, is, without such aids, full of danger to the country, or to himself. the importance of popular education, soaring at sightless distance above the petty forms and mere elements of reading, writing and a little calculation, must be impressed in words of fire, uopon the hearts and minds of the freemen of this republic, or they will cease to be freemen. Ignorance is as naturally the cradle of vice and slavery, as the morass is of pestilence and death. Nor let the tremendous error poison the mind, that intellectual light is sufficient to guard society. The cultivation must be moral, it must be that of the heart--its affections and passions. All other foundation is hollow hypocrisy and deceit. The source, the perennial fountain of the multiplied blessings of education, must be the home--the parental fireside. Here is the source of the holy influences, which are to sanctify society--sanctify it in the widest and noblest sense--in all the charities, all the duties of life."


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  • Caldwell, John William. Oration pronounced at Worcester (Mass.) July 4th, 1803. Worcester [Mass.], 1803. 15 pp.
    "In a Republican Government, which we all esteem the most valuable gift of indulgent Heaven, the will of the majority constitutionally announced, becomes a first principle of legal obligation."

  • Caldwell, Joseph Blake. d. 1811. An Oration, pronounced on the thirtysecond anniversary of American Independence, at Barre, in the county of Worcester, July 4, 1808. Worcester, July 1808. 29 pp.
    "Innumerable and complicated were the distresses they endured, until the memorable day we now celebrate, when, worn out by continued persecution, scourged, past endurance, by the mercenary minions of arbitrary power, appealing to Heaven for the rectitude of their intentions, they proclaimed their INDEPENDENCE to the world! To support the high and important rank, they had thus heroically assumed among the nations, they pledged their 'lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.'"

  • Caldwell, Charles. An Oration commemorative of the American Independence, delivered before the American Republican society of Philadelphia, on the Fourth of July, 1810. Philadelphia, 1810. 33 pp.
    "The event we commemorate is calculated to awaken our joy, because it has been the chief source of our national, and is essentially connected with our individual, felicity.--It is calculated to awaken and foster in our bosoms a well founded and laudable pride, because it has been, at once, the day-spring and the meridian, the commencement and the consummation, of glory to the American character.--It is calculated to awaken our highest admiration, on account of the wisdom, the valour, the incorruptible virtue and the unbending firmness, that were displayed in its achievement.--And it is calculated--pre-eminently calculated to awaken our gratitude to a variety of objects--gratitude to the sages who planned--gratitude to the heroes who achieved our revolution--and, above all, gratitude, glowing gratitude to the God of our fathers and countrymen, who smiled on their efforts in the cause of virtue, of freedom, and of glory!"

  • Caldwell, Charles, 1772-1853. An Oration, commemorative of American independence; delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society of Pennsylvania, on the fourth day of July, 1814, by Charles Caldwell, M.D. a member of the Society. 66 pp. 22 cm.

  • Caldwell, Samuel, B.T. An Oration pronounced at Manchester, N.H., before the republican citizens of Goffstown, Bedford and Manchester: on the anniversary of American ... Concord, N.H, 1814. 23 pp.

  • Callender, John. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1797, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, 1797. 18 pp.

  • Camp, John, 1753-1821. An Oration, delivered at the village of Oxford, in the county of Chenango, and state of New-York, on the 4th of July, 1809, being the thirty-third anniversary of American independence by John Camp. 12 pp.

  • Campbell, James. An Oration, in commemoration of the Independence of the United States of North-America, delivered July 4, 1787, at the Reformed Calvinist church ... . Philadelphia, 1787. 24 pp.

  • Carter, Nathaniel H. (Nathaniel Hazeltine), 1787-1830. An Oration, delivered before the Republicans of Portland, on the thirty-ninth anniversary of American independence. By Nathaniel H. Carter. 19, [1] pp. 22 cm.

  • Catlin, Jacob, 1758-1826. The horrors of war, a sermon delivered at New-Marlborough, Mass. at the celebration of independence by Jacob Catlin preached and published at the request of a branch of the Washington Benevolent Society. 11 pp.

  • Cayford, John. An Oration, pronounced at Goffstown, July 4, 1805, the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, by John Cayford. 23 pp.

  • Chadwick, Jabez, 1779-1857. A sermon, delivered at Milton, July 4, 1808, in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America, by Jabez Chadwick. 18 pp.

  • Chandler, Adoniram, 1792?-1854. An Oration delivered before the New-York Typographical Society on their seventh anniversary, July 4, 1816, by Adironam Chandler. 13 pp.

  • Chandler, Joseph, 1780-1846. An Oration, delivered at the Centre Meeting-house in Monmouth, Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1804, being the anniversary of American independence, by Joseph Chandler. 15 pp. 21 cm.

  • Chandler, Joseph, 1780-1846. An Oration pronounced at the Centre Meeting-House in Monmouth, Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1806, in commemoration of American independence by Joseph Chandler. 12 pp. 22 cm.

  • Chandler, Peleg W. (Peleg Whitman). The Morals of freedom: An Oration delivered before the authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1844. Boston, 1844. 53 pp.

  • Channing, Edward Tyrrel, 1790-1856. An Oration, delivered July 4, 1817, at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Edward T. Channing. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Chapin, E. H. (Edwin Hubbell). The American idea, and what grows out of it: an Oration, delivered in the New-York crystal palace, July 4, 1854. Boston, 1854. 18 pp.

  • Chapman, Jonathan. An Oration delivered before the citizens of Boston on the sixty first anniversary of American Independence: July 4, 1837. Boston, 1837. 23 pp.

  • Charlton, Thomas U. P. (Thomas Usher Pulaski), 1779-1835. Oration, in commemoration, of American independence; delivered at the Exchange, in the city of Savannah, July 3d, 1802. By Thomas U.P. Charlton, Esq. 15, [1] pp. 23 cm.
    "At length, fired with indignation at the ignominies, hourly accumulating on them, by a servile and dependent connection with the British throne,--our Countrymen no longer endeavored to sooth by concession,--or to court further oppressions, by a criminal inactivity. They rose in their strength, besought Almighty God to prosper their efforts; 'and exhibited the curious spectacle, of a people attacked by unprovoked enemies, without imputation, or even suspicion of offence--of enemies who boasted of their priviledges and civilization, and yet proffered no milder conditions, than SERVITUDE OR DEATH."

  • Chauncey, Nathaniel, 1789-1865. An Oration delivered before the Washington Association of Philadelphia, and the Washington Benevolent Society of Pennsylvania, on the Fourth of July, 1815, by Nathaniel Chauncey. 22 pp. 21 cm.

  • Cheves, Langdon. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's church, before an assemblage of the inhabitants of Charleston, on the Fourth of July, 1810, in ... Charleston, [1810]. 17 pp.

  • Chicago. Celebration of the eighty-sixth anniversary of the Independence of the United States, in Chicago, July 4th, 1862. Chicago, 1862. 31 pp.

  • Chickering, Jabez, 1753-1812. An Oration pronounced at Dedham on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1812, by Jabez Chickering. 16 pp. 21 cm.

  • Child, Gardner, d. 1818. An Oration, delivered at Richmond, Vermont, on the thirty first anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1807. By Gardner Child. [Two lines of verse] vi, [1], 8-44 pp. 18 cm.

  • Church, John Hubbard, 1772-1840. An Oration, pronounced at Pelham, New-Hampshire, July 4th, 1805, the anniversary of the declaration of American independence, by John Hubbard Church. 23 pp. 21 cm.

  • Church, Rodney S. An Oration of the forty-third anniversary of American independence delivered at Clermont, Monday, July 5th, 1819 by Rodney S. Church. 17 pp.

  • Citizen of the United States. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July 1800 by a citizen of the United States. To which is added The female advocate written by a lady,. 39 pp.

  • Clagett, Clifton, 1762-1829. An Oration upon the independence of the United States of America, delivered at Litchfield, N.H. at the request of a committee of its inhabitants, before a very numerous audience, July 4, 1803, being the 27th anniversary by Clifton Clagett. 15 pp. 22 cm.

  • Claggett, William, 1790-1870. An Oration, pronounced at Portsmouth, N.H., on the fourth day of July 1812, in commemoration of the thirty-sixth anniversary of American independence by William Claggett. 32 pp. 23 cm.

  • Claggett, William. An Address, delivered before the Portsmouth anti-slavery society, on the fourth of July, A.D. 1839, being the 63d anniversary of the Independence ... Portsmouth, N.H., 1839. 20 pp.

  • Clark, Daniel Atkinson. Independence-Sermon, delivered July 4, 1814, at Hanover, N. Jersey. Newark, 1814. 24 pp.

  • Clark, Joseph. An Oration delivered at Rochester; on the Fourth of July, seventeen hundred ninety four. Dover [N.H.]: Printed by Samuel Bragg, -- [1794] 12 pp.; 21 cm.(8vo)

  • Clark, Orin, 1788-1828. Address delivered at Trinity Church, Geneva, at the celebration of the 43rd anniversary of American independence, 5th July, 1819 by Orin Clark. 12 pp.

  • Clark, Peter I. An Address delivered at Flemington on the anniversary of American independence, 4th July, 1817, by Peter I. Clark. 15 pp.

  • Clark, Thomas M. (Thomas March). Oration delivered before the municipal authorities and citizens of Providence, on the eighty-fourth anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1860 . Providence, 1860. 30 pp.

  • Clarke, Walter. "The state of the country": an Oration delivered at Buffalo, July 4th, 1862. Buffalo; ([Buffalo]), 1862. 19 pp.

  • Clough, John. An Address, delivered on the Fourth of July, 1801: before the Franklin Typographical Association of New-York, and a select company / by John Clough. New-York: Printed by George F. Hopkins, 1801. 16 pp.

  • Cobb, Oliver, 1770-1849. An Oration, delivered in the First Congregational Meeting-house in Rochester, on the fourth day of July, 1803 by Oliver Cobb. 11 pp. 20 cm.

  • Cogswell, Nathaniel. An Oration, delivered before the Republican citizens of Newburyport, in the Rev. John Giles' meeting-house, on the Fourth of July, 1808. Newburyport, 1808. 19 pp.

  • Colman, Henry. An Oration delivered in Salem, July 4, 1826 : at the request of the town, on the completion of a half century since the declaration of American ... Salem [Mass.], 1826. 22 pp.

  • Coleman, Nathaniel. Oration delivered at Chesterfield on the anniversary of independence, on the Fourth of July, 1804 by Nathaniel Coleman. 16 pp.

  • Collamer, Jacob, 1791-1865. An Oration, delivered at Fairfax, Vt., on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1811, by Jacob Collamer. 14 pp.

  • Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Supreme Executive of the State, in compliance with a resolve of the Legislature, of June, 1786, will assemble on the fourth day of July next, to celebrate the anniversary of the Declaration of the Independence of the United States of America: and on this occasion, the Governor and Council invite [Lieut. F.M. Cleary, Esq.] to accompany them from the Senate Chamber in Boston ... June 24, 1816. Broadside.

  • Conant, Gaius. An Oration pronounced at Franklin on the Fourth of July, 1803: the anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. Printed at Providence, M,DCCC,III. 12 pp.

  • Condy, Thomas D. (Thomas Doughty). An Oration delivered in St. Philip's Church before an assemblage of the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on the 5th day of July, 1819 ... Charleston [S.C.], 1819. 19 pp.

  • Cooke, Parsons. Moral machinery simplified: A Discourse delivered at Andover, Massachusetts, July 4, 1839. Andover, 1839. 40 pp.

  • Cooke, Phinehas, 1781-1853. An Oration delivered at Keene, N.H., before the Washington Benevolent Society on the 5th day of July, 1813, being the anniversary of American independence by Phinehas Cooke. 16 pp. 24 cm.

  • Coolidge, Calvin, President, U.S. Address to the Convention of the National Education Association, Washington, DC, July 4, 1924.
    "That there could have seen gathered together a body of men so learned in that science, so experienced in its application, so talented and so wise in its statement and demonstration, as those who prepared, formulated, and secured the adoption of the American Constitution, will never cease to be the wonder and admiration of the profoundest students of Government. After making every allowance for a fortunate combination of circumstances and the accomplishments of human ingenuity, they have been nearly all forced to come to the belief that it can be accounted for only by the addition of another element, which we must recognize as the guiding hand of Providence."

  • Coolidge, Calvin, President, U.S. Presidential speech in Philadelphia commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July 5, 1926. Also here (scroll half-way down the page). Also published in San Antonio Express, July 6, 1926.
    "We meet to celebrate the birthday of America. The coming of a new life always excites our interest. Although we know in the case of the individual that it has been an infinite repetition reaching back beyond our vision, that only makes it the more wonderful. But how our interest and wonder increase when we behold the miracle of the birth of a new nation. It is to pay our tribute of reverence and respect to those who participated in such a mighty event that we annually observe the fourth day of July. Whatever may have been the impression created by the news which went out from this city on that summer day in 1776, there can be no doubt as to the estimate which is now placed upon it. At the end of 150 years the four corners of the earth unite in coming to Philadelphia as to a holy shrine in grateful acknowledgement of a service so great, which a few inspired men here rendered to humanity, that it is still the preeminent support of free government throughout the world.
    ... "About the Declaration there is a finality that is exceedingly restful. It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may therefore very well discard their conclusions for something more modern. But that reasoning can not be applied to this great charter. If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final. No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions. If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people. Those who wish to proceed in that direction can not lay claim to progress. They are reactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers.
    "In the development of its institutions America can fairly claim that it has remained true to the principles which were declared 150 years ago. In all the essentials we have achieved an equality which was never possessed by any other people. Even in the less important matter of material possessions we have secured a wider and wider distribution of wealth. The rights of the individual are held sacred and protected by constitutional guaranties, which even the Government itself is bound not to violate. If there is any one thing among us that is established beyond question, it is self-government--the right of the people to rule. If there is any failure in respect to any of these principles, it is because there is a failure on the part of individuals to observe them. We hold that the duly authorized expression of the will of the people has a divine sanction. But even in that we come back to the theory of John Wise that 'Democracy is Christ's government.' The ultimate sanction of law rests on the righteous authority of the Almighty."

  • Covell, Lemuel, 1764-1806. An Oration, delivered at Pittstown, state of New York, on the Fourth of July, 1804 ..., by L. Covell. 33 pp.

  • Crafts, William, 1787-1826. An Oration delivered in St. Michael's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on the Fourth of July, 1812, in commemoration of the independence of the United States by William Crafts. 26 pp. 20 cm.

  • Crane, John, 1756-1836. An Oration, delivered at Douglass, Monday, July 5th, 1802 the day assigned for celebrating the anniversary of American independence by John Crane. 23 pp. 23 cm.

  • Cuming, George, 1771?-1830. An Oration, delivered on the 4th of July, 1810, in the Presbyterian Church, in East Rutger-Street, before the following societies; Tammany, Taylors', Hatters', Hibernian Provident, Masons', Shipwrights', Carpenters', and Columbian. By Dr. Cuming, from the Hibernian Provident Society. Published at the request of the committee of arrangement. [Four lines from Smollett] 14 pp. 21 cm.

  • Cumming, Hooper, 1788-1825. Oration delivered July 4th, 1817, by Hooper Cumming. 15 pp. 23 cm.

  • Cunningham, William, 1767-1823. An Oration, pronounced at Fitchburg, July 4, 1803 at the request of Federal Republicans by William Cunningham, Jun. 78 pp. 20 cm.

  • Curtis, Charles Pelham. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1823: in commemoration of American Independence, before the supreme executive of the Commonwealth, ... Boston, 1823. 33 pp.

  • Curtis, George Ticknor. The True uses of American Revolutionary history: an Oration delivered before the authorities of the city of Boston, on Monday, the fifth of July, ... Boston, 1841. 32 pp.

  • Curtis, George Ticknor. An Oration delivered on the fourth of July, 1862: before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston. Boston, 1862. 45 pp.

  • Cushing, Caleb. An Oration on the material growth and progress of the United States: delivered at Springfield, Mass., on the Fourth of July, 1839. Springfield [Mass.], 1839. 31 pp.

  • Cushing, John. A Discourse, delivered at Ashburnham, July 4th, 1796, at the request of the militia officers in said town: who, with the infantry under their ... Leominster (Massachusetts), 1796. 24 pp.

  • Cushman, Joshua, 1761-1834. An Oration, pronounced at Augusta, Maine, on the 4th of July, 1807, in commemoration of American independence, by Joshua Cushman. 23 cm.

  • Cushman, Joshua, 1761-1834. An Oration pronounced at Wiscasset, on the Fourth of July, 1808, in commemoration of independence of the United States of America, by Joshua Cushman. 22 pp.

  • Cushman, Joshua, 1761-1834. An Oration pronounced at Waterville, July 4, 1814, in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America, by Joshua Cushman. 23 pp.

  • Cutter, Charles William. An Oration pronounced before the Whigs of Portsmouth, on the fourth of July, A.D. 1834. Portsmouth, N.H., 1834. 31 pp.


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  • Daggett, David. An Oration, pronounced in the brick meeting-house, in the city of New-Haven, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1787. It being the eleventh anniversary ... . New-Haven, [1787]. 24 pp.

  • Daggett, David. Sun-beams may be extracted from cucumbers, but the process is tedious. An Oration, pronounced on the Fourth of July, 1799. ... . New-Haven, 1799. 27 pp.

  • Daggett, David, 1764-1851. An Oration delivered at Greenfield, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1805, in commemoration of our national independence by a friend to the public welfare. 16 pp.

  • Dana, Daniel, 1771-1859. A Discourse delivered in Newburyport, July 4, 1814, in commemoration of American independence, and of the deliverance of Europe, by Daniel Dana. 20 pp. 21 cm.

  • Dana, Richard Henry. An Oration delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society at Cambridge, July 4, 1814. Cambridge [Mass.], 1814. 22 pp.

  • Dana, Samuel. An Oration pronounced at Groton in the commonwealth of Massachusetts on the fourth of July, A.D. 1807: in commemoration of the Independence of ... Amherst, N.H, 1807. 18 pp.

  • Dane, Joseph, 1778-1858. An Oration, pronounced at Kennebunk, Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1809, by Joseph Dane, Esq. 12 pp.

  • Danforth, Thomas. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1804 at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, 1804. 20 pp.

  • Davidson, Robert. An Oration, on the independence of the United States of America: Delivered on the 4th of July, 1787. / By the Rev. Robert Davidson, D.D. Pastor of the Presbyterian congregation in Carlisle, and professor of history and belles lettres, in Dickinson College. Carlisle [Pa.] : Printed by Kline and Reynolds, [1787] 16 pp.; 20 cm.

  • Davis, Daniel. An Oration, delivered at Portland, July 4th, 1796 : in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Printed at Portland, [1796]. 19 pp.

  • Davis, John, 1787-1854. An Oration pronounced at Worcester (Mass.) on the fortieth anniversary of American independence, by John Davis. 23 pp. 21 cm.

  • Davis, Matthew Livingston. An Oration delivered in St. Paul's Church, on the Fourth of July, 1800 : being the twenty-fourth anniversary of our Independence: before the ... New-York, 1800. 22 pp.

  • Dayton, Aaron Ogden. Eulogy on La Fayette: pronounced before the Society of Cincinnati of the state of New-Jersey, on the 4th of July, 1835. [U.S.?], 1835. 42 pp.

  • Deady, Matthew P. (Matthew Paul). Oration delivered at Portland. Portland [Or.], 1885. 33 pp.

  • Deane, E. (Ebenezer). An Oration, pronounced at Tinkertown, July the Fourth, 1804, by E. Deane. 23 pp.

  • Deane, E. (Ebenezer) An Oration, pronounced at Stirling, July 4, 1811, by E. Deane. 24 pp. 18 cm.

  • Deane, Samuel. An Oration, delivered in Portland, July 4th, 1793, in commemoration of the Independence of the United States of America. Portland, 1793. 14 pp.

  • Dearborn, H. A. S. (Henry Alexander Scammell), 1783-1851. An Oration delivered at Salem, on the Fourth of July, 1806, by Henry Alexander S. Dearborn. 14 pp.

  • Dearborn, H. A. S. (Henry Alexander Scammell), 1783-1851. An Oration delivered at Boston, on the fourth day of July, 1811, before the Supreme Executive and in presence of the Bunker-Hill Association by Henry A.S. Dearborn published by request. 15 pp. 22 cm.

  • Democratic Party (Mass.). Worcester, June 20, 1808. Sir, The undersigned are appointed a committee to correspond with their Republican brethren in the county on the business of the celebration of the ensuing Fourth of July. ... [4] pp. 25 cm.

  • Denny, Austin. An Oration delivered at Worcester, (Mass.), July 4th, 1818. Worcester [Mass.], 1818. 15 pp.

  • Devereux, John C. Address on the anniversary of American Independence: celebrated July 5, 1852, at Jamaica, N.Y., by the Catholic temperance societies of Long Island. New York, 1852. 16 pp.

  • Dexter, Franklin. An Oration delivered July 4, 1819 : at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, [1819]. 19 pp.

  • Dickins, Asbury. Oration delivered in the Capitol in the city of Washington on the Fourth of July, 1825. Washington [D.C.], 1825. 20 pp.

  • Dickinson, Samuel Fowler. An Oration in celebration of American Independence: delivered at Belcherstown, July 4th, 1797. Northampton, (Mass.), 1797. 21 pp.

  • Doane, George Washington. America and Great Britain: the Address, at Burlington college, on the seventy-second anniversary of American Independence, July 4, MDCCCXLVIII. Burlington [N.J.], 1848. 12 pp.

  • Doane, George Washington. The Young American: his dangers, his duties, & his destinies: the Address, at Burlington college, July 4, 1853, the seventy seventh anniversary ... Philadelphia, 1853. 18 pp.

  • Dodge, Nehemiah A Sermon delivered at West Springfield, Massachusetts, on the 5th of July, A.D. 1802, to the inhabitants who met to celebrate the anniversary of the 4th of July. Hartford [Conn.]: John Babcock, printer, 1802. 23 pp.; 23 cm.

  • D'Oyley, Daniel. Oration, delivered in St. Michael's Church: before the inhabitants of Charleston, South Carolina, on the Fourth of July, 1803: in comemoration of American independence / Daniel D'Oyley.

  • Dow, John. A Discourse delivered by request, July 4, 1806, in the Methodist Church, at Belleville, by John Dow. 22 pp.

  • Drake, Charles D. (Charles Daniel). Speech of Charles D. Drake of St. Louis: delivered at a Union meeting at the city of Louisiana, Mo., July 4, 1861. Saint Louis, 1861. 17 pp.

  • Drayton, William. An Oration delivered in the First Presbyterian Church, Charleston, on Monday, July 4, 1831. Charleston, S.C.; (Charleston), 1831. 103 pp.
    "America's cause of quarrel was the imposition of a petty tax, which was levied merely as an evidence of the prerogative of the mother-country to raise revenue from the colonies. They refused to yield to taxation without representation; and in defence of an abstract principle, their citizens mutually pledging 'to each other their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honors,' drew their swords, and appealing to God and their rights, rushed into the conflict with the most potent monarch in Europe."

  • Dunbar, John Danforth, 1768-1810. An Oration, pronounced on the 4th of July, 1805, at Pembroke, at the request of a convention of Republicans from various parts of the county of Plymouth, by John Danforth Dunbar. 23 pp. 24 cm.

  • Dunham, Josiah, 1769-1844. An Oration delivered at Hanover, in the vicinity of Dartmouth College, before the several Washington Benevolent Societies of Hanover, Lebanon, Lime, Norwich, and Hartford, on the thirty-eighth anniversary of American independence and in commemoration of the great events in Europe, which have terminated so honorably to the allied arms, and so triumphantly glorious to the cause of humanity by Josiah Dunham. 25 pp. 23 cm.

  • Dunlap, Andrew. An Oration delivered at Salem on Monday July 5, 1819, at the request of the Association of the Essex Reading Room: in celebration of American ... Salem [Mass.], 1819. 15 pp.

  • Dunlap, William, 1766-1839. The Glory of Columbia, her yeomanry a play in five acts the songs, duets, and chorusses, intended for the celebration of the Fourth of July at the New-York Theatre. 12 pp. 15 cm.

  • Durfee, Job, 1790-1847. An Oration, pronounced at the Baptist meeting-house, in Tiverton, on the fifth day of July, 1813, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Job Durfee. 18 pp. 22 cm.

  • Dutton, Warren. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1805, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston in commemoration of American Independence. [Boston], [1805]. 16 pp.

  • Dwight, Eilliam T. (William Theodore). The nationality of a people its vital element: an Oration delivered in the New City Hall before the city government and citizens of Portland, ... Portland [Me.], 1861. 32 pp.

  • Dwight, Theodore. An Oration, spoken before the Society of the Cincinnati, of the state of Connecticut, met in Hartford, on the 4th of July, 1792. Printed at Hartford, 1792. 17 pp.

  • Dwight, Theodore. An Oration spoken at Hartford in the state of Connecticut on the anniversary of American Independence, July 4th, 1798. Hartford, 1798. 31 pp.

  • Dwight, Theodore. An Oration, delivered at New Haven on the 7th of July, A.D. 1801, before the Society of the Cincinnati, for the state of Connecticut, assembled to celebrate the anniversary of American independence. Hartford [Conn.] : Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, 1801. 43 pp. ; 24 cm.

  • Dwight, Timothy. The Duty of Americans, at the present crisis, illustrated in a Discourse, preached on the fourth of July, 1798; by the Reverend Timothy Dwight, D.D. president of Yale-College; at the request of the citizens of New-Haven. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, 1798. 32 pp.

    Where religion prevails, Illumination cannot make disciples, a French directory cannot govern, a nation cannot be made slaves, nor villains, nor atheists, nor beasts. To destroy us therefore, in this dreadful sense, our enemies must first destroy our Sabbath and seduce us from the house of God.

    ... Religion and liberty are the meat and the drink of the body politic. Withdraw one of them and in languishes, consumes, and dies. If indifference to either at any time becomes the prevailing character of a people, one half of their motives to vigorous defense is lost, and the hopes of their enemies are proportionally increased. Here, eminently, they are inseparable. Without religion we may possibly retain the freedom of savages, bears, and wolves, but not the freedom of New England. If our religion were gone, our state of society would perish with it and nothing would be left which would be worth defending. Our children, of course, if not ourselves, would be prepared, as the ox for the slaughter, to become the victimes of conquest, tyranny, and atheism.

  • D'Wolf, John, 1786-1862. An Address delivered to the citizens of Bristol, R.I., July 4, 1816, and published at their request. 38 pp.


    E
  • Eacker, George I., d. 1804. An Oration delivered at the request of the officers of the brigade of the city and county of New York, and of the county of Richmond before them, and the Mechanic, Tammany, and Coopers' societies, on the Fourth of July, 1801, in commemoration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of American independence by George I. Eacker. 23 pp. 19 cm.

  • Edmond, David. An Oration, delivered in Ridgfield, on the Fourth of July, 1799, before a large concourse of people, assembled to commemorate their national independence. By David Edmond. Danbury [Conn.], MDCCXCIX. [1799].

  • Eliot, Samuel. The functions of a city: an Oration before the city authorities of Boston, on the Fourth of July, 1868. Boston, 1868. 30 pp.

  • Elliot, Samuel, 1777-1845. Oration, pronounced at West Springfield, Mass., July Fourth, eighteen hundred and three by Samuel Elliot. 24 pp.

  • Elliot, Samuel, 1777-1845. An Oration, pronounced at Brattleboro', Vt., before the Washington Benevolent Societies of Windham County and the public, in commemoration of the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence by Samuel Elliot. 23 pp. 22 x 13 cm.

  • Elliott, Benjamin, 1786-1836. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on Friday, the Fourth of July, 1817 in commemoration of American independence by Benjamin Elliott. 23 pp. 22 cm.

  • Ellis, Jonathan, 1762-1827? An Oration delivered at the court-house in Topsham, July 4th, 1806, on the anniversary of our national independence, before the Federal Republicans of Brunswick and Topsham, by Jonathan Ellis. 16 pp. 21 cm.

  • Ely, Ezra Stiles, 1786-1861. The Duty of Christian Freemen to Elect Christian Rulers: A Discourse delivered on the Fourth of July, 1827, in the Seventh Presbyterian Church. Philadelphia, 1828. 32 pp. "With an appendix, designed to vindicate the liberty of Christians, and of the American Sunday School Union." Reprinted in Joseph Blau, ed., American Philosophic Addresses, 1700-1900 (New York, 1946), pp. 551-62, and Joseph Blau, "The 'Christian Party in Politics,'" Review of Religion, XI, no. 1, Sept. 1946. Extracted in The Reformer: A Religious Work, Volumes 7-8, Printed by J. Rakestraw, 1826, pp. 135-137. This extract includes critical commentary of Ely's position. "We are a Christian nation; we have a right to demand that all our rulers in their conduct shall conform to Christian morality; and if they do not, it is the duty and privilege of Christian freemen to make a new and a better election."
  • Emerson, Samuel, 1765-1851. An Oration on the independence of America pronounced at Kennebunk, July 4th, 1803 by Samuel Emerson. 13 pp. 23 cm.

  • Emerson, Samuel, 1765-1851. An Oration pronounced at Washington Hall, in Kennebunk, Maine, on the Fourth of July 1811, by Samuel Emerson. 12 pp.

  • Emerson, William. An Oration pronounced July 5, 1802, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence. Boston: Manning & Loring, printers, [1802] 23 pp.; 22 cm.

  • Emmons, Nathanael. A Discourse, delivered July 5, 1802, in commemoration of American independence. Wrentham, Mass.: Printed by Nathaniel Heaton, Jun., 1802. 24 pp.; 20 cm.

  • Emmons, Williams, 1784-1855. An Oration, commemorative of American independence, pronounced at Hallowell, July fourth, 1809 by William Emmons. 20 pp. 22 cm.

  • Evans, Richard, 1777-1816. An Oration delivered at St. John's Church ... on the Fourth July, 1805, by Richard Evans. 20 pp.

  • Evarts, Jeremiah, 1781-1831. An Oration delivered at Charlestown, Mass., on the Fourth of July, 1812, in commemoration of American independence, by Jeremiah Evarts. 32 pp. 22 cm.

  • Everett, Alexander Hill. A Defence of the character and principles of Mr. Jefferson: being an Address delivered at Weymouth, Mass., at the request of the anti-Masonic ... Boston, 1836. 76 pp.

  • Everett, David, 1770-1813. An Oration, pronounced at Amherst, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1804, the anniversary of the declaration of American independence, by David Everett. 26 pp. 21 cm.

  • Everett, Edward. An Oration delivered at Cambridge on the fiftieth anniversary of the Declaration of the Independence of the United States of America. Boston, 1826. 54 pp.

  • Everett, Edward. An Oration delivered before the citizens of Charlestown on the fifty-second anniversary of the Declaration of the Independence of the United States of America. Charlestown, 1828. 43 pp. Also here.
    "It remained then to give its last great effect to all that had been done, since the discovery of America, to establish the cause of liberty in the western hemisphere, and by another more deliberate effort, to organize a government, by which, not only the present evils, under which the country was suffering, should be remedied, but the final design of Providence should be fulfilled. Such was the task, which devolved on the council of sages, who assembled at Philadelphia, on the second Monday of May, 1787, of which, General Washington was elected President, and over whose debates your townsman, Mr Gorham, presided, as chairman of the committee of the whole, during the discussion of the plan of the federal constitution."

  • Everett, Edward. Dorchester in 1630, 1776 and 1855: An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1855: also an account of the proceedings in Dorchester at the Celebration of the Day. Boston, 1855. 165 pp. Also here.
    "The free district school was of itself an important institution was one of the pillars of the State. But the most important thing was the spirit with which it was maintained. Into it was infused, at the outset, and ever after, the genius of a Christian civilization, a civilization which was the growth of ages. Greece had developed the human mind with reference to politics, literature and art, but without a knowledge of the divine plan in respect to the end of human existence. Rome had defined the rights of the individual in a wonderful system of law, and by conquest diflfused this legal spirit over the civilized world; and yet Rome never knew the true value of the human soul, nor the ground of its claim to liberty. Education, in these ancient seats of honor and refinement, could not rise above the principle on which it was founded.
    "The Christianity of the early and middle ages furnished the first corrective, but blindly excluded ancient culture as a component part of a complete Christian education. Still an intensity was given to the longings and activity of the human mind by means of its contact with spiritual and eternal things, which prepared it, on its reunion with ancient culture by the revival of learning, to produce what never before existed, a civilization flowing from Christianity as its source, but running in channels opened and prepared by Greece and Rome. [Cheers.]
    "The swelling stream of Christianity, making all former and all contemporary progress tributary to itself, this it was which, by a Providential arrangement, came to our fathers at the very time that the institutions of the old world checked its free course, and the new world was thrown open with its larger and freer channels of communication. All previous history was necessary to prepare the colonists for founding our free States. No other people could be educated in the same spirit. It was because our fathers were true to their high trust, with lofty views and aims, striving to usher in a better period, that succeeding generations have been educated and trained for the service required of them in the cause of humanity. The essential condition of success in our schools now is the keeping up in our minds of this pure ideal of human society. [Cheers.]
    "We must instill into the minds of the young, ideas of a higher and purer life, and make them feel that there is a great work for them and their posterity to achieve, which was impossible in former years; that all the past has been slowly accumulating knowledge and inventing means and instruments for them to employ in advancing to a still higher degree the well-being of society. The mere mechanical drill of the schoolroom, the daily toil of the teacher in giving the elements of knowledge, will not advance society unless the social atmosphere breathed by the young be healthful and invigorating. The family educates; the social circle educates; the political press educates; literature educates; fashion educates; the public assembly educates; we this day educate. Unless all these teachings tend in the right direction, it will be in vain that we trust in our schools for safety. The schools receive their character from the people. You have tenfold more power over teacher and pupil than they have over you, and can more effectually prevent the good they would do, than they the evil you may do. Create, then, a pure moral atmosphere for your schools. Let the town and the neighborhood be free from contamination, and then it will not reach the school. Let the love of freedom, of virtue and of religion everywhere be manifest, and then a new generation will be trained up in our schools, with all the care that is now bestowed upon them, to whom it will be safe, with God's blessing, to commit the sacred interests which we so tenderly cherish in our hearts this day. [Applause.]

  • Everett, Edward. Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston: on the fourth of July, 1860. Boston, 1860. 69 pp. Also here.
    "We have come for this year, 1860, to do our part in fulfilling the remarkable prediction of that noble son of Massachusetts, John Adams, -- who, in the language of Mr. Jefferson, was "the Colossus of Independence, -- the pillar of its support on the floor of Congress." Although the Declaration was not adopted by Congress till the fourth of July, (which has therefore become the day of the Anniversary,) the Resolution, on which it was founded, passed on the second instant. On the following day accordingly, John Adams, in a letter to his wife, says,
    Unable to restrain the fulness of his emotions, in another letter to his wife, but of the same date, naturally assuming that the day on which the resolution was passed would be the day hereafter commemorated, he bursts out in this all but inspired strain:
    ... "Our constitutions, whether of the United States or of the separate States, exclude all public provision for the maintenance of Religion, but in no part of Christendom is it more generously supported. Sacred Science is pursued as diligently and the pulpit commands as high a degree of respect in the United States, as in those countries where the Church is publicly endowed; while the American Missionary operations have won the admiration of the civilized world. Nowhere, I am persuaded, are there more liberal contributions to public-spirited and charitable objects, -- witness the remarkable article on that subject, the second of the kind, by Mr. Eliot, in the last number of the North American Review. Our charitable asylums, houses of industry, institutions for the education of deaf mutes and the blind, for the care of the pauper, and the discipline and reformation of the criminal, are nowhere surpassed."

  • Everett, Edward. The Great Issues now before the country: An Oration. New York, 1861. 50 pp. Also here and here.
    Without counting the population of the seceding states, there are ten millions of the free citizens of the country, between Pittsburg and Fort Union, who claim the course and the mouth of the Mississippi as belonging to the United States. It is theirs by a transfer of truly imperial origin and magnitude; theirs by a sixty years' title; theirs by occupation and settlement; theirs by the law of Nature and of God."

  • Everett, William. An Oration before the city authorities of Boston: on the Fourth of July, 1870. Boston, 1870. 37 pp.
    "The Declaration of Independence which we have heard read,--is it a mere rhetorical flourish? is it a mere manifesto? is it only another way of saying, 'Let us fight this question of Rebellion out'? Not so, every true American answers; it is a state paper of the greatest significance, in which some exceptionable phrasess are overcome by the weight of the matter. Yes; but what kind of a state paper? Was it merely like the letters which a secretary of state writes to a foreign minister, to explain or defend something in the conduct of himself or another official? or has it in some way a binding force beyond the temporary occasion? I believe a document of such a character, creating and moving a nation as it did, brought before the world with every possible formality by the unanimous vote of the representative body of the nation, and accepted by all successive generations as the authoritative exposition of the popular will, can be regarded in no other light than as an exposition, in accordance with that will of the great principles of organic law. And if so, then no organic or statute law that contravenes it can in principle be legal; and none that clearly furthers it can in principle be illegal. No stream can rise higher than its fountain. No articles of confederation, or constitution, or treaties, or acts, or ordinances, can claim to express the sense of the nation more directly than the original charter which set the whole in motion."


    F
  • Fairfax, Ferdinando, 1766-1820. Oration delivered in Charlestown, in Virginia, on the Fourth of July, 1805, by Ferdinando Fairfax with a few alterations and additions, made soon after. [73] ]. 20 cm.

  • Fairfield, Jotham. An Oration pronounced at the meeting-house in the vicinity of Dartmouth College, on the Fourth of July, 1811, by Jotham Fairfield. 15 pp. 21 cm.

  • Fairfield, Jotham. An Oration pronounced at Waterville, July 5, 1813, by Jotham Fairfield. 26 pp.

  • Fales, William A., d. 1824. An Oration pronounced at Lenox, July 4th, 1807, in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence by William A. Fales. 22 pp.

  • Farley, Stephen, 1779-1851. An Oration, pronounced at Hanover, N. H., July 4, 1804, being the anniversary of American independence, by Stephen Farley. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Farrar, Joseph, fl. 1809. An Oration delivered at Danbury, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1809, in commemoration of American independence, by Joseph Farrar. 14 pp. 18 cm.

  • Fay, Richard S. (Richard Sullivan). An Oration delivered before the citizens of Boston: on the fifty-eighth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1834. 29 pp.
    "Whatever bitterness of party may exist however local or sectional interests may divide, all parties and all sections unite in grateful thanks to that Providence, which has made this day to us, the landmark of our liberty and laws."
    ... "Assembled to celebrate this day in a place long consecrated to the holy purposes of divine worship, we should not suffer the occassion to go by, without paying a tribute of thankfulness for the benefits of the religious freedom we enjoy, nor forget that we owe to the mild doctrines of the Christian religion, our greatest temporal, as well as eternal good. Its progress, has been the advancement of all the social virtues, of all intelligence, wisdom and sound morality. It has implanted in man a higher sense of the moral dignity and excellence of which he is capable. But let us remember that the universal toleration upon the subject of religion, may be abused. It may lend its aid to bigotry and intolerance, or it may run rapidly to atheism and infidelity. It is our duty to check its evils and nourish its good tendencies, and under the guidance of strict scrutiny, it will go onward, changing for the better, the face of society. It is to the public what it is to individuals, the guide and regulator of the footsteps of man, and knowing its blessings and advantages, we should endeavour at all times to give it its due weight. Let us remember, that though we accord universal toleration of religious worship and opinions, we are not bound to submit quietly to the practices, nor give countenance to the public professions, of atheism and infidelity. The iufluence and example of every one who values the effects of the religion of Jesus upon mankind, should frown upon the blasphemous endeavors of those, who set the revelations from God at defiance, remembering that they who are unwilling to submit to the laws of divinity, can need but little inducement to disobey aud scoff at the institutions of man.
    "Upon this subject, Washington addressed the nation, in that memorable legacy of wisdom he gave to the country on retiring from the cares of public life, 'of all dispositions and habits,' says this great and good man, 'which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should laber to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, the firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. Tho mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and cherish them, a volume could not trace all their connexions with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked, where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of our religious obligations desert the oaths, which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us, with caution, indulge the supposition, that morality can he maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect, that national morality can prevail, in exclusion of religious principle."

  • Fay, Samuel Philips Prescott. An Oration delivered at Concord on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1801. Cambridge [Mass.]: Printed by William Hilliard, 1801. 20 pp.; 22 cm.

  • Federal Party (N.J.) Proceedings and Address of the second convention of delegates, held at the city of Trenton, on the fourth July, 1814, to the people of New Jersey. 32 pp. 21 cm.

  • Fellowes, Jeremiah. Odes in celebration of independence, July 4th, 1815. [Exeter, N.H.: s.n., 1815] 1 broadside.

  • Felton, Franklin Eliot. The Purification and reconstruction of the American union: an Oration delivered at Vallejo, July IV, 1867. San Francisco, 1867. 22 pp.

  • Fessenden, Samuel, 1784-1869. An Oration delivered before the Federal Republicans of New Gloucester and the adjacent towns, July 4, A.D. 1811, by Samuel Fessenden. 49 pp. 20 cm.

  • Fessenden, Thomas. A sermon, delivered July 4th, 1802, at Walpole, N.H. in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Walpole, N.H.: Printed for Thomas & Thomas, by David Newhall, 1802. 31 pp.

  • Fishback, James, 1776-1845. An Oration delivered in the First Presbyterian Church in the town of Lexington, Ky. on the 4th day of July, 1816, by James Fishback. 34 pp. 23 cm.

  • Fisher, Jacob. An Oration pronounced at Kennebunk on the fourth day of July, 1799: being the anniversary of American Independence. Portland [Me.], 1799. 19 pp.
    "Eternal praise and gratitude to the GOD of HEAVEN, who ordained, that we were born and do exist at a time when HE thus pours a profusion of His blessings on the land we live in.

  • Flagg, Henry C. (Henry Collins), 1792-1863. An Oration delivered before the Harmony Society in New-Haven on the fortieth anniversary of American Independence, by Henry C. Flagg. 14 pp.

  • Fletcher, Isaac, 1784-1842. An Oration pronounced at Holles, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1810 by [Isaa]c Fletcher. 18 pp. 22 cm.

  • Flint, Timothy, 1780-1840. An Oration delivered at Leominster July 4, 1815, before the Washington Benevolent Societies of Lancaster and Sterling and of Leominster and Fitchburg by Timothy Flint. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Ford, Henry, 1783-1848. An Oration, delivered in the Presbyterian Church at Morris-town, July 4, 1806. By Henry Ford, A.B. 23, [1] pp. 18 cm.
    "It depends upon that God, who, in an almost miraculous manner, kept our councils united and firm, when our existence as a nation depended upon union, and when there were so powerful causes of disunion; and who has still preserved us from those convulsions which have shook the powers of the eastern world, and still continue to shake them to their bases, to uphold us ... to transmit our privileges to unborn generations. He who can most feelingly realize his goodness--receives his blessings the most as God meant they shall be received--takes most enjoyment from them, is the most truly wise man; and, through his thanksgiving and prayer, we may hope for a continuance of mercies. He who is wise to observe these things, shall understand the loving kindness of the Lord."

  • Foster, Edmund, 1752-1826. An Oration pronounced at Westford on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1804, by Edmund Foster. 25 pp. 23 cm.

  • Foster, Edmund, 1752-1826. An Oration pronounced at Littleton July 4, 1806, the thirtieth anniversary of American independence by Edmund Foster. 23 pp. 23 cm.

  • Foster, Festus, 1776-1845. An Oration pronounced at Hardwick, July 4th, 1812, being the thirty-sixth anniversary of American independence by Festus Foster. 17 pp. 21 cm.

  • Foster, Festus, 1776-1845. An Oration pronounced before the Washington Benevolent Society of the County of Franklin, in the Town of Northfield, July 5, 1813, in commemoration of the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence by Festus Foster, 22 pp. 24 cm.

  • Foster, John. An Oration, pronounced on the 4th of July, 1808, by John Foster. 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Fowler, Bancroft, 1775-1856. A Discourse delivered at Windsor, Vermont, on the Fourth day of July, 1811, in commemoration of the American independence, by Bancroft Fowler. 22 pp. 22 cm.

    The occasion, my brethren and friends, on which we have assembled, is a joyful and solemn occasion. It is no other than to commemorate the birth-day of our National Independence,--to retrace the steps by which we arrived at that event,--to review the scenes, through which we passed--to recall to mind the labors, and dangers, and sufferings by which it was obtained--and what ought to be our principal concern, to make our devout acknowledgments to that great and good BEING, by whose favor and blessing it was accomplished. And what can be more appropriate, as a theme of discourse, than the words which I have just read? In these words, MOSES, by divine direction, required of the children of Israel, annually to commemorate the day of their deliverance from the Egyptain bondage, which may be considered the day on which their National Independence commenced. They had been a nation perculiarly favored of heaven. From a single family, or rather from a single pair, they had been increased to a numerous and powerful nation. They had passed through a variety of scenes, in all which they experienced, in a peculiar degree, the favor and protection of GOD. These signal mercies demanded of them special acknowledgments. They were required, therefore, to do and observe a number of things, as memorials of particular favors which they had received. But as their deliverance from the bondage of Egypt was an event, in which the divine interposition was remarkably visible, and laid the foundation of their existence, as an independent nation, they were required to observe the day, on which it took place, ass a standing memorial of the divine goodness. And have not we, also, my hearers, experienced, as a nation, signal interpositions of divine Providence, in our favor. And ought not we to observe, as the Jews were required to do, the day on which commenced our national existence, as a memorial of the divine goodness? We have not, indeed, as they had, an express divine command to do this. But when we consider the similarity between the favors, which the Jews, as a nation, received at the hand of GOD, and those which have been conferred on us, does there not appear to be an evident propriety in it?

    What I propose, therefore, on the present occasion, is, in the First place, to endeavor, more at large, to shew the propriety of commemorating the day of our National Independence, from a comparison of the national favors, which we have received, at the hand of GOD, with those which were conferred on the Jews;--and Secondly, to point out some of the ends for which it ought to be observed.

  • Fraser, Charles (1782-1860). An Oration, delivered in St. Michael's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, on the 4th of July, 1808: in commemoration of American independence by appointment of the American Revolution Society, and published at the request of that society. Charleston [S.C.]: Printed by J. Hoff, no. 6, Broad Street, 1808 40 pp.; 20 cm.
    "Where indeed in the annals of the world, do we find such a co-operation of virtuous energies, tending to the accomplishment of so great an event! Where in the progress of human actions, were ever experienced such signal proofs of Divine Interposition! Characters and circumstances seemed destined for each other to ensure the vast designs of providence. In the gloomiest conflict of adversity some friendly beam betrayed a sacred guidance, and cheered the desponding hopes of our countrymen. In the proudest moments of triumph an invisible monitor was present to check its insidious confidence, and keep alive the ardor of perseverance. Under such auspices and in a cause so worthy, they manifested a spirit more than Roman. How or in what terms can we speak of them! If we resort to the splendid ornament of imagery, imagery is not the language of truth. If we endeavour to exalt them by comparison, comparison is inadequate, for no period of history embraces such an assemblage of virtues."

  • Freeman, Frederick. Religious Liberty: A Discourse delivered in the Congregational church at Hanson, on the Fourth of July, 1832. Plymouth, Mass., 1832. 32 pp.

  • Freeman, Peyton R. (Peyton Randolph). An Oration pronounced at Potsmouth [sic], N.H., on the fourth day of July, 1810: being the thirty-fourth anniversary of American Independence. Portsmouth, N.H., [1810]. 21 pp.

  • Freeman, William, 1783-1879. An Oration, delivered at the request of the selectmen of Portland, July 4th, 1808, by William Freeman. 12 pp. 21 cm.

  • Frelinghuysen, Frederick, 1788-1820. An Oration delivered July fourth, 1812, before the New Jersey Washington Benevolent Society, in the city of New Brunswick, by Frederick Frelinghuysen. 16 pp. 21 cm.

  • French, Ebenezer. An Oration pronounced July 4th, 1805 before the Young Democratic Republicans of the Town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of ... 2nd edition. Boston, 1805. 23 pp.

  • Froeligh, Moses, 1763-1817. A Discourse delivered at Montgomery, in commemoration of the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence, July 5th 1813 by Moses Froeligh. 16 pp. 23 cm.

    As nothing is more valuable in this life, and nothing more condusive to our temporal happiness, than liberty, and nothing more destructive to a people, and more inconsistent with their welfare than slavery, so nothing can alarm a free people more than when their liberties are invaded, and nothing afford them more joy, than when lost liberty is restored to them again, or that which is invaded properly secured. All men are born free, and liberty appears as a natural to man, as reason, and unless too far degenerated, a person will equally exert himself to preserve both. With this heavenly jewel, every thing that is near and dear to us is connected, and when this is taken from us, we become truly miserable in every respect. Therefore our fears and joys as a people will rise and fall according as it stands with our liberty.

  • Frost, John, 1776-1847. An Oration delivered at the request of the citizens of Durham, New-Hampshire on the Fourth of July, 1805, by John Frost. 12 pp.

  • Frothingham, Richard. Oration delivered in Newburyport on the Fourth of July, 1851: at the request of the municipal authorities. [Boston], [1851]. 12 pp.

  • Fuller, H. Weld (Henry Weld), 1784-1841. An Oration, pronounced in the meeting-house at Augusta, on the fourth day of July, 1804, being the twenty-eighth anniversary of American freedom, by H. Weld Fuller. 13 pp.

  • Fuller, Timothy. An Oration pronounced at Watertown, July 4, 1809 : at the request of the Republicans of Watertown and the adjacent towns in commemoration of the ... Boston, 1809. 15 pp.

  • Fuller, Timothy. An Oration pronounced at Lexington, Massachusetts, on the fourth of July, A.D. 1814: being the thirty-eighth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1814. 23 pp.

  • Furman, Richard. America's deliverance and duty: A Sermon preached at the Baptist Church in Charleston, South-Carolina, on the fourth day of July, 1802: before the State Society of the Cincinnati, the American Revolution Society, and the congregation which usually attends divine service in the said church / by Richard Furman; published at the joint request of the two Societies. Charleston [S.C.]: Printed by W.P. Young, 1802. 22 pp.; 20 cm.
    ... "Thirdly, consider the apparent interpositions of Providence, in favor of the revolution. Under this head we may notice, with propriety, the time when the contest began; in respect of the numbers, strength, and opulence of the colonies; their general union, notwithstanding a diversity in habits and interests; and their possessing citizens, equal to the arduous services which were requisite for the council and the field. In these we may discover strong evidences of a kind superintending Providence. To which may be added, an apparent contorl over our enemies, manifested in the wrong measures adoped by them, in some instances; and the frustration of their best concerted plans in others,
    "Some of the disasters which befel ourselves may be assigned to the same cause; though as mercifully intended to convince us, when become too confident and secure, where our true strength lay: such were the disasters in Canada, and at the Lakes; the repulse at Savannah; the fall of Charleston; and the defeat of Gates.
    "In our favor we joyfully recount the detection of Arnold's conspiracy; the defence of Sullivan's Island; the victory at Saratoga, at Trenton, at Guilford (as it was in effect,) and the grand triumph at York-Town. Nor should the defeat of Tarleton, and others of a similar nature, which were produced at critical moments, and followed with extraordinary effects, be forgotten. "The friendly aid of the French monarch, and that of the states general, though springing out of national rivalship, and a regard to their own interests; were yet providentially directed in our favor.
    "The preservation of the life of general Washington, in the midst of dangers, and of other compatriots, and heroes of the revolution, merits a place, and our devout acknowledgement in this enumeration of Divine interpositions."


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  • Galusha, Elon, 1790-1856. An Address delivered by request of the Association of the Sons of Liberty in Bennington, Vermont, on the Fourth of July 1814 by Elon Galusha. 15 pp. 24 cm.

  • Gardiner, John. An Oration: delivered July 4, 1785, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston in celebration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, [1785]. 58 pp.
    "The first church of our ancestors with their venerable pastor took refuge in Holland where, finding the manners of the people more licentious than they thought consistent with true piety, after a few years residence, they first formed the resolution of seeking an asylum from royal and prelatick tyranny in the wilds of this new world. Having a firm reliance upon the goodness and mercy of their GOD, they embarked for Hudson's River, committed themselves to the raging element of the sea, and resolutely determined to live or to die FREEMEN. Their manners, formed by letters and a religious education, and exercised in the schools of affliction and oppression, were pious, simple, frugal, decent, patient, resolute. HE who neither slumbers nor sleeps,--HE who directeth all things in the heavens and in the earth, covered them with HIS almighty wings, and in his wisdom decreed that this then dreary wilderness should receive the determined fugitives.--Strong to labour and patient of fatigue, the dark, thick woods of the ancient forest fell before them, and the country around them soon began to blossom like the garden of Eden."

  • Gardiner, John D. (John David), 1781-1849. An Oration, delivered in Roxbury, N.J. on the Fourth of July, 1807, by Jonh D. Gardiner. 29 pp. 20 cm.

  • Gates, Isaac, 1777-1852. An Oration pronounced publicly at Bedford, New-Hampshire, before the Washington Benevolent Society in that place, July 4th, 1814 by Isaac Gates. 20 pp.

  • Geneva. American residents. Celebration of the ninetieth anniversary of American independance [sic] in Geneva (Suisse) July 4th, 1866.[Geneva], [1866]. 41 pp.
    Dr. Merle d'Aubigne:
    "Citizens of the United States, we, citizens of Geneva, of Switzerland, rejoice to see you in our country, to receive you in our city. We are thankful for the opportunity you afford today to the small old republic of greeting the new great one. Citizens of America, the citizens of Switzerland shake hands with you. We rejoice and we thank God that he has raised up your great people. We rejoice and we thank God that he has sent to you that Gospel which makes free, that you have remained faithful to the great cause of independance that began in a day, which we now meet to celebrate. We rejoice and we thank God that you send out to distant nations of the Earth the Bible and the missionaries, who give liberty, true liberty to man. We rejoice and we thank God for the abolition of slavery, for the reestablishment of peace in your country, for the resolutions of Christian men among you to consecreate their strength to the glory of God and the liberty of mankind. Ladies and gentlemen I propose to you a toast which I am sure will be responded to with joy: Civil and religious liberty in the whole world! (Great applause.)

  • Gilbert, Elias, d. 1814. Ebenezer, or, A monumental call to pious acknowledgments to God for national blessings, in a sermon delivered at Greenfie1d, Saratoga County, July 4th, 1807 by Elias Gilbert. 23 pp.

  • Giles, Joel. Practical liberty: an Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston in the Tremont temple, July 4, 1848. Boston, 1848. 23 pp.
    "Jewish faith, Grecian impetuosity, Carthaginian energy, Roman fortitude, Swiss patriotism, Dutch valor, British courage, and our father's invincible prowess, are all our rightful heritage, as sons of the purest Liberty; and we are bound in Christian honor to make them tell, in the glorious fields of peaceful enterprise for the head, the hand, and the heart, which God has opened before us.
    "The duty is great, but the promise is greater; for the Redeemer of our race, whose gospel is the foundation and guaranty of all our liberties, has said, that if ye continue in my word, then shall ye know the truth, and the truth shall make you free."

  • Giles, John, 1755?-1824. An Address, delivered before the Republican citizens of Newburyport, and the neighbouring towns, in the Rev. John Giles' meeting-house, on the Fourth of July, 1809, by John Giles. 16 pp. 24 cm.

  • Gilmer, Francis Walker, 1790-1826. An Oration delivered at the Presbyterian church in Winchester, on the fortieth anniversary of American independence, by Francis W. Gilmer. 14 pp.

  • Gilpin, Henry Dilworth. A Speech delivered at the Democratic celebration by the citizens of the second congressional district of Pennsylvania, of the fifty-eighth Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July 4th, 1834. [Philadelphia], [1834]. 27 pp. Also here.
    "The spirit that animated our forefathers is not dead; the sons of men who risked their fortunes for their freedom, are not to be frightened at the panic of a bank; nor are the descendants of those who braved armies from abroad, to be scared by the noisy intrigues of ambition at home. Our country will go onward, as she has done, in her noble march. We shall smile ere long at the efforts and presumption of these our days. We shall meet together, as we now do, on many a future anniversary of our independence, to rejoice in the unmoved grandeur of our political institutions, and to confess that corruption and ambition, oppression and faction, when exposed to the view and judgment of the people, war against them alike in vain. And God grant! that, when centuries shall have rolled by, and our people are dwelling on every mountain summit, and filling every fertile plain, from the waves of one ocean to another, the stranger who shall chance to be among them, on this returning day, may behold them celebrating the festival of our nation's birth, blessed -- not only with extended empire, and unbounded wealth -- but blessed with that, without which it were better to dwell within narrow limits and a rugged land, a government of equal laws, of equal rights, founded, upheld, examined and controlled by the watchful spirit of the people."

  • Girard College. Account of the proceedings on laying the corner stone of the Girard College for Orphans, on the fourth of July, 1833: together with the Address, pronounced on that occasion at the request of the building committee, by Nicholas Biddle. Philadelphia, 1833. 26 pp.
    "But it is manifest that all the means of education, thorough, perfect education, are to be provided; that every facility for the acquisition of knowledge should be at hand; nor is thee any reason why the Girard College--liberally endowed beyond all example--should not be superior to any existing establishment, in the talents of its professors, or the abundance of its means of instruction; and with the blessing of God, so it shall be."

  • Gilbert, Elias, d. 1814. Civil and religious liberty precious and worth preserving, a sermon delivered at Greenfield, July 4th, 1810 by Elias Gilbert. 18 pp. 23 cm.

  • Gleason, Benjamin. An Oration on the anniversary of American Independence: pronounced before the senior class of Rhode-Island college, in College Chapel, on the Evening of the 5th of July, 1802. Boston, 1802. 16 pp.
  • Gleason, Benjamin, 1777-1847. An Oration, pronounced at the request of the "Charlestown light infantry", before the Republican citizens of Charlestown, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1805 by Benjamin Gleason. 2nd ed. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Gleason, Benjamin. An Oration, pronounced before the Bristol Lodge, in Norton ... on St. John's anniversary : June 24th, A.L. 5806 / by Benjamin Gleason. 2nd ed. Boston: Printed by Belcher and Armstrong, 1806. 22 pp.; 22 cm.
    "They preferred a barren wilderness, and the friendship of the uncivilized Indians, to all the magnificence, and splendor of Monarchy; they preferred to worship GOD, in their own manner, in a wilderness, rather than be compelled to worship with those, with whose creed, they could not conscientiously coincide. Such was the situation of the first settlers of New-England, they explored the tempestuous ocean, in an unfavorable season of the year, and after combating the many billows of adversity, which had often threatened their destruction, they landed, on forefather's rock, Plymouth. 1620.

  • Gleason, Benjamin, 1777-1847. An Oration, pronounced before the Republican citizens of the town of Hingham, in commemoration of American independence, July 4th, 1807 by Benjamin Gleason. 22 pp. 23 cm.

  • Gleason, Benjamin, 1777-1847. An Oration, pronounced before the republican citizens of Charlestown, on the thirty-seventh anniversary of our national independence Monday, July 5, 1813 by Benjamin Gleason. 16 pp. 25 cm.

  • Gleason, Benjamin. Anniversary Oration in commemoration of American Independence: pronounced before the republican citizens of Charlestown, July 5, 1819. Charlestown [Mass.], 1819. 15 pp.
    "Be it gratefully remembered, that when the little band of heroes first adventured for religious freedom, from their home to the Netherlands, and thence over the mighty deep to this new world, now distinguished as 'the asylum of all nations,' they were led, were protected, were preserved, by a gracious Providence, which cherished the inspiring ardor of liberty."

  • Gleason, Joseph. An Oration, pronounced on the thirtieth anniversary of American independence, before the Young Democratic Republicans of the town of Boston ..., July 4, 1806 by Joseph Gleason, Jun. 24 pp. 24 cm.

  • Glezen, Levi. An Oration delivered before the citizens of Lenox on the anniversary of American Independence, 1802.
    "Another source of joy, which affects our breasts on this day, is the effects, which have flowed from the American Revolution. It has impressed a benign aspect on Religion. Various, indeed, are the forms, under which the God of Heaven is worshiped. The people appeal to their own good sense in the choice of their religious creeds and the fising generation, far from having their minds shackled with false opinion and wild theories, as soon as they commence their existence, which it is lawful for them neither to examine nor contradict are early invited to the exercise of their reason on religious subjects, and to ground the principles of their moral conduct on truth, derived from the contemplation of nature, of society and the Scriptures.--Americans voluntarily support their religion."

  • Glover, Elias. An Oration, delivered at the court-house in Cincinnati, on the Fourth of July, 1806, by Elias Glover. 24 pp. 19 cm.

  • Goddard, Josiah. An Oration, delivered on the anniversary of independence, at Conway, on the Fourth of July, 1804, by elder Josiah Goddard. 24 pp.

  • Goddard, Josiah. An Oration, delivered on the anniversary of Independence, at Goshen, on the Fourth of July, 1805, by Elder Josiah Goddard. 24 pp.

  • Gordon, William. The separation of the Jewish tribes, after the death of Solomon, accounted for, and applied to the present day, in a Sermon preached before the General Court, on Friday, July the 4th, 1777. Being the Anniversary of the Declaration of Independency. Boston, M,DCC,LXXVII. 36 pp.
    "I might enlarge, but must forbear. Tis expedient and opportune however to mention that would we have our independency perpetuated, let us repent of our sins, attend to religion, and live the doctrines of christianity; then may we reasonably expect, that future generations will joyfully commemorate this anniversary, and that the names of those who boldly stood forth in the cause of liberty, and acted a consistent and uniform part will be blessed."

  • Granger, Gideon. An Oration, spoken on Tuesday, the fourth of July, 1797, at the East Meeting-House in Suffield: being the anniversary of American Independence. Suffield [Conn.], M,DCC,XCVII. [1797]. 22 pp.
    "Honesty is the best policy, as well with respect to nations as to individuals. Experience shows, that if by fraud, intrigue, and cunning, in their intercourses, commerce, and dealings; one nation gains any considerable advantage over another, it immediately becomes the source of uneasiness and discontent--never fits well; seldom lasts long; and sometimes issues in bloody and destructive wars."
    ... "THE madness of crusades and all religious dessentions, which have kindled such implacable wars, and produced such dreadful massacres, as are scarcely to be read by a good natured man without amazement, horror, and tears, are now no more. Mankind may now worship the Author of the existence according to the dictates of their own consciences, and there be none to make them afraid."

  • Gray, Edward. An Oration, delivered July 5, 1790: at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in celebration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1790. 15 pp.
    "'Civil liberty (says a great Judge) consists, not in a right to every man, to do just what he pleases; but it consists in equal right, to all the citizens, to, have, enjoy, and to do, in peace, security, and without molestation, whatever the equal and constitutional laws of the country admit to be consistent with the public good.' This is the liberty for which Americans fought; and it is a prize worthy of the contest, and of them. They have proved how much they regard it, by adopting a Constitution, which must be its firm protection and support: A government, not forced upon, but voluntarily adopted by them; not framed by others, but by themselves"...

  • Gray, Francis Calley, 1790-1856. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1818, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, by Francis C. Gray. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Gray, John Chipman. An Oration, pronounced on the fourth of July, 1822 at the request of the inhabitants of the city of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of national independence. Boston: C. Callender, 1822. 20 pp.; 22 cm. Also here.
    "But it was the glory of our ancestors, in this as in many other respects, to reduce theory to practice; to execute those rules which had often been urged by the wisest political philosophers, as vitally important, and universally disregarded by governments, as visionary, erroneous, or injurious. The beneficial effects produced on the character of our ancestors by their militia system are so obvious, that very few words will be necessary to display them. A high spirit of independence can scarcely exist in any community, unless accompanied by the consciousness, that they hold their rights by a firmer tenure, than any which can result merely from written instruments; that their liberty is secured not merely by laws, but by the possession of physical force. Time would fail me to dwell on the religious or judicial institutions of our forefathers, or even to mention many others of scarcely less importance. I shall therefore detain you no longer on this part of my subject, than merely to point out the combined influence of the political, literary, and military institutions which existed among us, before the revolution, in bringing that all important struggle to a successful issue. It was because the minds of our citizens were expanded by early instruction at our public schools; because, in administering their internal concerns by their own representatives, they acquired a thorough knowledge of their great political rights; and because their skill in the use of arms, and in the rudiments of discipline, inspired them with a confidence not only in the justice but the strength of their cause, that the war of 1775 was truly and emphatically a war of the whole nation; that the people, instead of being the blind followers of a few illustrious leaders, were separately and individually actuated by a spirit as enlightened as it was enthusiastic, a spirit which carried them through seven years of defeat, to final victory, and which nothing could have quelled but utter extermination."

  • Grayson, Alfred W. An Oration, delivered in the Episcopal Church, on the Fourth of July, 1802 by Alfred W. Grayson. 24 pp.

  • Greene, Benjamin. (1674-1837) An Oration pronounced at Kittery, the Fourth of July, 1808. Portsmouth, Sevall, 1808. 16 pp.
    "Let us persevere in habits of peace and honest industry, influenced and governed at all times by the sacred obligations of religion and morality. We may rest assured, that no system of politics can be long as pror-- which -- -- public and private -- for its basis--we should therefore always be influenced by the integrity and moral worth, as well as by the intellectual powers and exterior accomplishments of the man(whatever may be his pretensions) is not to be ---- with the important concerns of others, and more especially with any thing that relates to their public interests, who does not feel himself in the first place accountable to his God, and his own conscience--for the faithful discharge of his duty. By looking well to the disposition of his own heart, and setting all right within himself, a single individual may render more essential service to his Country, than he can well imagine."

  • Greene, Benjamin. An Oration, pronounced at Lexington, July 4th, 1809, being the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1809. 24 pp.
    "Thanks to indulgent heaven; and thanks to the prudent care, unremitted attention, and unshaken perseverance of those whom has been committed the management of our national concerns, who have faced undauntedly the united exertions of foreign intrigues and domestick factions; the evils we so lagtely felt, and the dangers we so greatly feared, it may be presumed are passsed away, and we may this day joyfully hail the regeneration of American liberty. May we duly appreciate the blessings we enjoy; and by past experience taught, may we in future yield a cheefrul obedience to the laws, and due respect to those by whom they shall be faithfully administered. May we never be too hasty in the choice of our rulers, nor too jealous of them when chosen. We should spurn from our presence the ambitious disorganizer, who would tempt us to revolt against the constituted authorities of our country, or persuade us to a compliance with any unjust requisitions of a foreign government. To admit such to our society is dangerous; to our friendship, death. They are the apostles of fraud, the ministers of deceit. they will allure us with all the fascinating charms of virgin innocence; but no sooner shall they have decoyed us to their purposes, than they will pierce us to the heart with the fangs of a monster; and let it never be forgotten, that 'the tyger always crouches before he bounds upon his prey.'
    "In this cradle of our freedom, upon this hallowed spot, where the genius of America first erected her standard, the true principles of American liberty ever have been, and I trust ever will be cherished. Many in this place, who witnessed the horrors of the ever memorable morning of the 19th of April, 1775, and who saw the blood of their brethren and townsmen first shed in defence of those principles, are still living, and have a perfect recollection of the solemn and awful transactions of that eventful day; and some of those ancient men, whose lives were then in jeopardy, kind Heaven has mercifully preserved to this time; and by their presence they sanction these publick expressions of our joy. Ye venerable patriots! permit me from the heart, and in the name of our children, to tender you, upon this joyful occasion, our most sincere contratulations. to you, the return of this anniversary must be peculiarly grateful. When you risked your lives upon this ensangujined field, when you exposed your uncovered bosoms to the pointed steel of your adversaries, as a shield for your posterity, we, your children, who this day have the honour and the happiness to address you, had scarely entered upon the threshold of life. But by your precepts taught, and influenced by your examples, we always cultivated that love of country, which must inspire us with fortitude sufficient for its defence. You must experience, upon this occasion, that heartfelt satisfaction, which results from the belief that your patriotism survives in your children, and that what your valour has won, they with equal valour will maintain. With them you may safely deposit, what you have ever so highly prized. May you live many years to enjoy the happy fruits of your toils and dangers, and to rejoice in the peace and increasing prosperity of your country. But, alas! immortality lies not on this side the grave; many of your companions, both in danger and in triumph, already are no more. That holy man of God, whose place I now occupy, who so often wept over the graves of his slaughtered parishioners, who so often and so pathetically sympathized with the bereaved relatives of those who had been so suddenly snatched from their fond endearments; affectionately administering the balm of divine consolation to their wounded eharts; sedulously endeavouring, both by exhortation and example, to animate and support the drooping spirits of his countrymen in the darkest hours of their trial,; with many of his heroick compatriots, now rests in the silence of the tomb. Equally correct, sincere, and devout in his political and in his religious creed, manhy of you have witnessed his zeal for his country and his God. You, who were his parishioners, I know will pardon me this short apostrophe. For well I know how dearly you loved him while he lived, and how sincerely you respect his memory, now he is removed from your sight.
    "My friends, and countrymen, we are now before the altar of our God, who knows the secret motives which govern our conduct, the sincerity of our attachment to his glory, and to the glory of our country. By the blood of those victims, who have here been slain; by the sacred memory of all those heroes and patriots, who have fought, bled, and died in the same righteous cause; by our own rights, as freemen, and the solemn obligations we are under to transmit those rights unviolated and undiminished to our posterity; by the truth and integrity of the virtuous citizen, and by the unsillied honour of the American soldier, we will here, in the presence of the All-seeing Eye, offer our solemn asseverations, that the shades of our illustrious ancestors shall never be insulted, nor the glory of their fame be tarnished by the degeneracy of their sons."

  • Greene, Christopher Rhodes. An Oration, delivered in St. Michael's church, Charleston, South-Carolina: on Tuesday, the Fourth of July, 1815: in commemoration of American Independence. Charleston, 1815. 25 pp. Also here.
    "Hear our rejoicings, and receive our thanksgivings, O thou Omnipotent Ruler of Nations, and while other countries groan under thy wrathful indignation, grant us eternal UNION, LIBERTY and PEACE!"

  • Greene, Henry, 1762?-1849. [An] Oration delivered at Shoreham to a numerous collection of citizens of Addison County on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1812 by Henry Greene. 15 cm.

  • Greenough, William Whitwell. The Conquering Republic: An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1849. Also here. Boston, 1849. 38 pp.
    "The direct effects of the American and of the first French revolutions were not confined to France. England has reaped more substantial benefits from the progress of just ideas than any country of the old world. Since the revolution of 1688, sufficient civil, political, and religious freedom had existed to secure to the great majority of the population a large proportion of their natural rights. Many improvements in the political system had been made without any intervention of arms. It was not incumbent upon other colonies of Great Britain to attempt resistance to her laws, as her whole colonial policy had been altered, from experience of the errors through which she had lost the most valuable of her possessions beyond the seas. No further extension of freedom was purchased by the effusion of blood. But through public discussion, by the will of the people, expressed through their representatives in Parliament, and by the wise moderation of the House of Lords, constitutional changes have been effected, which have materially increased the privileges of Englishmen. To their civil liberties, little or no addition could be made. But the repeal of the Test and Corporation acts, Catholic emancipation, and the passage of the Reform Bill, have largely extended political and religious liberty. What other changes may be necessary will be unfolded by time. From what the world knows of her character and resources, it seems probable that further improvements will not depend upon violent catastrophes."

  • Grennell, George. An Oration pronounced at Northampton on the anniversary of American Independence, 1811. Northampton [Mass.], 1811. 24 pp.
    "If a particular providence is ascribed to the Deity over the affairs of men, we cannot resist the conviction, that this constellation of patriots was planted in our hemisphere to enlighten, to direct and to save our country."

  • Grimké, John Fauchereaud, 1752-1819. An Oration delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on Saturday, the Fourth of July, 1807, in commemoration of American independence by John Fauchereaud Grimke. 20 pp.

  • Grimké, Thomas Smith, 1786-1834. An Oration delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, on the Fourth of July, 1809, by the appointment of the South-Carolina State Society of Cincinnati, and published at the request of that society, and of the American Revolution Society by Thomas S. Grimké. 53 pp. 21 cm.
    "And shall the advocate of patriotism, the eulogist of departed worth, the orator of Independence, complain that his subject is barren and uninteresting? Do the blessings of Heaven descend on a country, more favoured than ours? Or does the world contain a nation, more strikingly distinguished? Does the wide circle of human knowledge embrace a theme more fertile than Liberty? Or the annalls of history an era, more glorious and eventful, than American Independence?"

  • Grimké, Thomas Smith. Oration on the principal duties of Americans: delivered before the Washington Society, and other citizens of Charleston: in the Second Presbyterian Church, on Thursday the 4th of July. Charleston [S.C.], 1833. 37 pp.
    "The FIRST duty of Americans is to acknowledge, with mingled fear and gratitude, that 'God presides in the Councils of Nations.'* and that these have ever acted a conspicuous part in the administration of his moral government. However mysterious may be the designs of Providence, and his ways are not as our ways, nor his thoughts as our thoughts; yet, all history, as well as scripture attests the truth of this remark."
    * Washington's Inaugural Address, 5 Marsh. 168.

  • Griswold, Stanley. The Good land we live in: a Sermon, delivered at Suffield (Connecticut) on the celebration of the anniversary of American Independence, July 7th, 1802. Suffield [Conn.], 1802. 29 pp.
    "But as the occasion on which we are assembled is American, the object we shall contemplate is AMERICA. As we are eating and are full of its fruits, and are met to bless the Lord our God for the good land he hath given us, let us consider the land in some of its essential beauties and circumstantial blessings, that our gratitude may be the more ardent and our rejoicings sincere."

  • Griswold, Stanley, 1763-1815. The exploits of our fathers, or, A concise history of the military events of our Revolutionary War, An Oration delivered at Cincinnati, Ohio, July 3d, 1813 ... by Stanley Griswold. 27 pp.

  • Grosvenor, Thomas Peabody. An Oration, delivered at the town of Claverack, on the Fourth of July, 1801. Hudson [N.Y.]: Printed at the Office of the Balance, 1801. 20 pp.; 17 cm.
    "Yes--we are indebted to the smiles of a kind Providence, for every blessing. And that smile, which framed our constitution, which placed it under the guardianship of a WASHINGTON and an ADAMS, was the salvation of our country. Yes--we are contented--nay! proud to acknowledge, that the same God, who led our fathers to fertilize a wilderness; who reared up a WASHINGTON to guide our armies, has also showered floods of prosperity upon the policy of the federal administration."

  • Grosvenor, Thomas Peabody. An Oration delivered in Christ-Church, Hudson, on the fourth of July, 1808: with explanatory notes, &c. [Hudson, N.Y.]: Balance Press, [1808]. 30 pp.
    "Whether, then, our republic is destined to a long period of prosperity and happiness; or whether her days are numbered and her end approaches, let us, in either event, never shrink from the great contest of principle. In one firm phalanx, let us plant ourselves around the citadel of our freedom, resolved to defend it from invasion, or to be buried in its ruins. thus, we shall have performed our duty to ourselves, our country and our God; and then if our republic perish, we are guiltless."

  • Grout, Jonathan, 1763-1835. An Oration delivered in Heath on the anniversary of American independence, July the 4th, 1803, by Jonathan Grout published by request. 17 pp. 25 cm.

  • Gurley, Ralph Randolph. A Discourse, delivered on the fourth of July, 1825, in the city of Washington. Washington, 1825. 20 pp.
    "We profess to be Christians. We look for instruction in moral principles and practice, not to the maxims and examples of the world, but to the doctrines and precepts of the word of God. And does it not corroborate the other evidences of our Faith, to know that conscience, properly styled 'the God within the man,' when not rendered insensible by the lethargic influences of sin, when not darkened in it perceptions of things moral and spiritual, by the delusive glare of thigns temporal, is ever accordant in its judgments concerning human character and actions, with the decisions of Christianity? The man whose life is in entire opposition to the system of Christian ethics, has frequently been compelled, by the sincerest conviction, to acknowledge that this is the only pure, consistent, and perfect system: that it, alone, developes and inculcates the principole by which the highest order and felicity can be produced among men, and throughout the universe of intelligent minds."


    H
  • Haig, James. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1820, in commemoration of American independence. Charleston: W. P. Young And Son, Printers, 1820.
    "Could freedom then have despaired of success, under the guidance of these principles, and of men whose ambition was the glory of their country and the defence of her rights. Could the hirelings of slavery seriously have anticipated the conquest of a people whose hearts were alive to these lofty considerations, whose sufferings impressed them more deeply with the dignity of their cause, and whose every advantage was regarded as the evidence of its justice, and felt as the incentive to higher exertions? 'We are, and of right ought to be, free and independent,' was the inspired sentiment of according millions, and for the support of this declaration, 'with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, they mutually pledged to each other their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honours.' Once proclaimed, neither misfortune could shake, nor danger appal that fortitude, the consciousness of its truth infused. It was this which supported them under all the horrors of war, and invigorated them under all its vicissitudes. To all classes of the citizens it imparted an untiring ardor, an invincible confidence."

  • Haines, Charles G. (Charles Glidden), 1792-1825. An Oration delivered before the young Republican gentlemen of Concord and its vicinity, on the Fourth of July, 1809, being the thirty-fourth anniversary of American independence by Charles G. Haines. 13 pp.

  • Haines, Charles G. (Charles Glidden), 1792-1825. An Oration pronounced at the request of the Republican citizens of Concord and the neighboring towns, on the Fourth of July, 1811, by Charles G. Haines. 16 pp. 24 cm.

  • Haines, Charles G. (Charles Glidden), 1792-1825. An Oration delivered before the Republican citizens of Gilmanton and the adjacent towns on the Fourth of July, 1812, by Charles G. Haines. 21 pp.

  • Haines, Samuel, 1780-1825. An Oration, composed and pronounced at Sandbornton, New-Hampshire, July 4th, 1808, by Samuel Haines. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Hall, Joseph. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1800, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, on commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, [1800]. 23 pp.
    "Fortunately for ourselves and for our posterity, we were unlettered in the mazy lore of modern philosophy. The belief of a Supreme Being, the practice of religious and moral duties, we never viewed as uncongenial with the nature of our civil and political institutions. Nor were we such fanatics in philosophy to court hostility with a nation for a difference of creed in religion or politics."

  • Hall, M. (Moses) An Oration pronounced at Saugus, July fourth, 1815, the anniversary of American independence, by M. Hall. 32 pp. 24 cm.

  • Hallock, Robert T. The child and the man, or, Anniversary suggestions. New York, 1856. 38 pp.

  • Hamilton, James. An Oration, delivered on the Fourth of July, 1821, before the Cincinnati and Revolution societies. Charleston, 1821. 29 pp.

  • Hammond, Wells Stoddard. Oration, delivered at Cherry Valley, on the fourth day of July, 1839. Albany, 1839. 17 pp.

  • Harper, Robert Goodloe, 1765-1825. Oration delivered before the Washington Society of Maryland, on the Fourth of July, 1810, by Robert G. Harper. 12 pp.

  • Harrison, Ammi. An Oration delivered before the Harmony Society, in New-Haven, on the forty-first anniversary of American independence, by Ammi Harrison. 16 pp. 24 cm.
  • Harrison, Richard Almgill. Oration of the Hon. Richard A. Harrison: delivered at Pleasant Valley, Madison County, Ohio, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1863. London, O[hio], 1863. 21 pp.
    "During these eighty four years the American People wre united, prosperous, contented, happy, and free. Their happiness, and prosperity, and freedom were greater than any other nation had ever been favored with, by the Giver of all Good. And our entire population met, on this Anniversary, in every town and hamlet of our vast country, to manifest and express their admiration and reverence for their Heroic Ancestry, and to do homage to their memories--to recount the illustrious deeds, the severe trials, the hard-fought conflicts, and the glorious and enduring triumphs of these Heroes--to felicitate each other upon the peaaceful and complete enjoyment of the priceless blessings of civil and religious liberty--and to thank the God of our Fathers for having vouchsafed to us, as a people, unnumbered inestimable blessings. Our whole People rejoiced that their lots had been cast in a great country, and under a glorious Government, and the cup of their happiness was full. Their ways were ways of pleasantness, and all their paths were paths of peace."

  • Harvey, Matthew, 1781-1866. An Oration pronounced at Henniker, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1811, being the thirty-fifth anniversary of American independence, by Matthew Harvey. 14 pp.

  • Haskell, Abraham. Oration pronounced at Fitchburg before the Washington Benevolent Society of Leominster and Fitchburg: at their anniversary celebration of our ... . Worcester [Mass.], 1814. 36 pp.

  • Haswell, Anthony, 1756-1816. A slight view of the world. Taken July 4th, 1807. Tune "Black Sloven." 1 sheet ([1] p.) 45 x 30 cm.

  • Haswell, Anthony. The matter recited, and the cause advocated, in a series of airs, composed for the performance of the band of music and a choir of singers in Bennington, in celebrating the thirty second anniversary of American Independence. [Bennington, Vt.]: Printed by Halwell & Smead, 1808. 1 broadside.

  • Hay, George, 1765-1830. An Oration delivered on the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence, at the request of the "Society of Friends of the Revolution", in the capitol in Richmond, and published also at their request by George Hay. 23, 12 pp. 17 cm.

  • Hay, George, 1765-1830. Oration delivered on the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence, at the request of the "Society of Friends of the Revolution", in the capitol in Richmond, Virginia by George Hay, Esq. 13 pp. 22 cm.

  • Hayne, Robert Young, 1791-1839. An Oration delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on Monday the 4th of July, 1814, in commemoration of American independence, by appointment of the '76 Association and Published at the request of that society by Robert Y. Hayne. 2nd ed. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Haynes, Lemuel. The nature and importance of true republicanism, with a few suggestions favorable to independence : a Discourse delivered at Rutland (Vermont) the Fourth of July 1801, it being the 25th anniversary of American independence / by Lemuel Haynes; made public at the request of the audience. [Rutland, Vt.]: William Fay, printer, [1801] 24 pp.; 18 cm.

  • Hazen, Nathan W. (Nathan Wood). An Oration delivered in Haverhill, Mass.: on the fifty-first anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1827. Haverhill: Printed by A. W. Thayer, 1827. 28 pp.; 22 cm.

  • Hegeman, Adrian. An Oration, delivered on the Fourth of July, 1801, in the township of Oyster-Bay, in Queen's County : before a number of Republican citizens assembled to celebrate the anniversary of our national independence / by Adrian Hegeman. New-York: Printed by Dennison & Cheetham, at the office of the American Citizen, 1801. 15 pp.; 21 cm.

  • Hemstead, Benjamin. An Oration, delivered at Groton, on the twenty-ninth anniversary of American independence, July fourth, 1805, by Benjamin Hemstead. 14 pp. 22 cm.

  • Henderson, Josiah. An Oration delivered before the citizens of Stephen-Town, Westchester County, state of New York, July 4th, 1803, in commemoration of the American independence by Josiah Henderson published by the request of the committee of arrangement. 22 pp.

  • Henderson, Thomas. An Oration, delivered in the court-house, Cincinnati, before the citizens and volunteer companies of that place, on the 4th of July, 1807, being the thirty-first anniversary of American independence ... by Thomas Henderson. 12 pp. 18 cm.

  • Henry, Symmes C. (Symmes Cleves). An Oration delivered by appointment before the Cincinnatti [sic] Society of New-Jersey: in the Presbyterian Church, Trenton, July 5th, 1824. Trenton [N.J.], 1824. 22 pp.

  • Henshaw, David. An Address, delivered before an assembly of citizens from all parts of the commonwealth, at Faneuil hall, Boston, July 4, 1836. Boston, 1836. 39 pp.

  • Hersey, Thomas. Oration delivered at Cincinnati before the Tammany Society or Columbian Order, July 4th, 1814, by Thos. Hersey. 11 pp.

  • Herrick, Claudius. An Oration, delivered at Deerfield, on the Fourth of July, 1800. By Claudius Herrick. Printed at the request of the hearers. Greenfield, Massachusetts, 1800.

  • Heywood, Levi. An Oration delivered at Worcester, Mass. on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1810, by Levi Heywood. 15 pp.

  • Hildreth, Israel, 1791-1829. An Oration pronounced at Dracut, 1st Parish, on the 4th of July, 1818, in commemoration of American independence by Israel Hildreth. 18 pp.

  • Hill, Ira, ca. 1783-1838. An Oration, delivered at Albans, July 4, 1809, in commemoration of American independence, by Ira Hill. 23 pp.

  • Hilliard, Timothy, 1776-1842. An Oration, pronounced before the inhabitants of Portland, July 4th, 1803, being the twenty-seventh anniversary of American independence, by Timothy Hilliard.

  • Hillier, Richard. Liberty and equality: an Oration, wherein the principles of the Declaration of Independence, are illustrated and supported, and some of the ... Mount-Pleasant [N.Y.], 1800. 10 pp.

  • Hitchcock, Enos, 1745-1803. A Discourse on the causes of national prosperity, illustrated by ancient and modern history, exemplified in the late American revolution: Addressed to the Society of the Cincinnati, in the state of Rhode-Island, at their annual meeting at East-Greenwich, July 4, 1786. / By Enos Hitchcock, A.M. of Providence; [One line in Latin from Virgil]. Providence, Printed by Bennett Wheeler, [1786]. 25 pp. Also here.
    May we all live and act in character, as men, formed in the image of God, and capable of being happy only in his favour;--as republicans, whose political existence depends on knowledge and virtue;--as the disciples of Jesus Christ, whose name we bear! let us study and practise all those virtues which nature inspires, religion enjoins, or society makes necessary."

  • Hitchcock, Enos. An Oration delivered July 4, 1788, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Providence: in celebration of the anniversary of American independence, and of the accession of nine states to the Federal Constitution. / By Enos Hitchcock, A.M. Providence,Printed by Bennett Wheeler, [1788]. 23 pp.
    "But the liberties of America are the object of divine patronage--a guardian God protects them--This intervening cloud, which spread darkness and distress over our land, was a prelude to a brighter day. INDEPENDENCE was but a part of the revolution--and as we experienced many difficulties in laying the foundation, it was but natural to look for some in erecting the superstructure. "The blessings of a free government, which many nations have been unable to procure, even after ages of efforts and misery, are granted by divine providence, to the confederating States after a few years struggle."

  • Hitchcock, Enos. An Oration, in commemoration of the Independence of the United States of America: delivered in the Baptist meeting-house in Providence, July 4th, 1793. / By Enos Hitchcock, D.D. [Providence]: Printed by J. Carter, [1793] 19 pp.
    By the constitution of the United States, no man is abridged of the liberty of enquiry--no religious test is required--no bait is thrown out by government to encourage hypocrisy, or exclude the honest and deserving. In this respect it possesses a liberality unknown to any people before. It must give pleasure to every generous mind, to hear--the children of the stock of Abraham-- thus addressing our beloved president: "Deprived as we have heretofore been of the invaluable rights of citizens, we now (with a deep sense of gratitude to the Almighty Disposer of all events) behold a government erected on the majesty of the people--a government which to bigotry gives no sanction, to persecution no assistance, but generously affording to all liberty of conscience, and immunities of citizenship--deeming every one, of whatever nation, tongue or language, equal parts of the governmental machine. This so ample and extensive federal union, whose basis is philanthropy, mutual confidence, and public virtue, we cannot but acknowledge to be the work of the great God, who ruleth in the armies of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth."*

    *Extract from an address presented President Washington by the Jews at Newport, when on his tour through the eastern states, August 1790.

    May we ever show ourselves worthy of the blessings we enjoy, and never tarnish the bright lustre of this day, by any unbecoming excesses. Americans! think of the many privileges which distinguish your condition. Be grateful for your lot; and let your virtue secure what your valour, under God, hath obtained; and transmit to latest posterity the glorious inheritance. May the political edifice erected on the theatre of this new world, afford a practical lesson of liberty to mankind, and become in an eminent degree the model of that glorious temple of universal liberty which is about to be established over the civilized world.

  • Hoadly, Loammi Ives, 1790-d. An Address, delivered at the union celebration of Independence, at Sutton, Mass. July 5, 1824. Worcester [Mass.], [1824]. 19 pp.

  • Hobart, Benjamin, 1781-1877. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1805, at Abington, on the anniversary of American independence, by Benjamin Hobart. 20 pp.

  • Hobart, Elihu, 1785-1842. An Oration, pronounced at Abington, July 4, 1807, in commemoration of American independence,bat the request of a committee of young Democratic Republicans, from the towns of Abington and Bridgewater by Elihu Hobart. 24 pp. 24 cm.

  • Hobby, William J., d. 1841. An Oration delivered in St. Paul's Church, Augusta, on the Fourth of July, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight, being the twenty-second anniversary of American independence. By William J. Hobby, Esq. Augusta [Ga.], MDCCXCVIII. [1798].

  • Hobby, William J., d. 1841. An Oration delivered in St. Paul's Church, Augusta, on the Fourth of July, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine, being the twenty-third anniversary of American independence. By William J. Hobby, Esq. Augusta [Ga.], 1799.

  • Hodgdon, Moses, 1774-1840. An Oration, pronounced at Dover, New Hampshire, in commemoration of American independence, on the Fourth of July, 1808, by Moses Hodgdon. 18 pp.

  • Holman, Nathan, 1769-1844. An Oration, delivered at Attleborough East Parish, on Monday, July 5, 1802, at the anniversary celebration of American independence by Nathan Holman. 22 pp.

  • Holmes, Abiel, 1763-1837. An Address, delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society at Cambridge, 5 July, 1813. By Abiel Holmes, D.D. 28 pp. 24 cm.

  • Holmes, Abraham, 1754-1839. An Oration, pronounced at the meeting house in the first precinct in Rochester, on the Fourth of July, 1801 / by Abraham Holmes. New-Bedford [Mass.]: Printed by Abraham Shearman, 1801. 16 pp.

  • Holmes, John, 1773-1843. An Oration delivered at Alfred, in the county of York on the Fourth of July, 1809, in commemoration of the birthday of American independence, by John Holmes. 16 pp.

  • Holmes, John. An Oration, pronounced at Alfred, on the 4th of July, 1815, being the thirty ninth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1815. 23 pp.

  • Holmes, John Summers, 1823-1892. An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the City of Boston, July 5, 1858. Boston, 1858. 101 pp.

  • Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 1809-1894. Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston, on the Fourth of July, 1863. Boston, 1863. 59 pp.

  • Hopkins, James D. (James Dean), 1773-1840. An Oration pronounced before the inhabitants of Portland, July 4th, 1805, in commemoration of American independence, by James D. Hopkins. 25 pp. 22 cm.

  • Hopkinson, Francis. Account of the grand federal procession, Philadelphia, July 4, 1788 : to which is added, a letter on the same subject. [Philadelphia], [1788]. 23 pp.

  • Howe, Estes, 1780-1825. An Oration delivered in Worcester, Massachusetts, on the Fourth of July, 1808, in commemoration of American Independence [microform] / by Estes Howe. Worcester [Mass.]: Printed by Henry Rogers, 1808. 16 pp.

  • Howe, Nathaniel, 1775-1829. An Oration pronounced at Paris, Oxford County, Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1805: in commemoration of American Independence. Portland, 1805. 14 pp.

  • Hubbard, John W. (John Williams), 1793-1825. An Oration pronounced at Worcester, Ms. on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1811, by John W. Hubbard. 9 pp. 22 cm.

  • Hubbard, Thomas, Jr. An Oration, pronounced on the twenty-sixth anniversary of American independence, before the Franklin Literary Association by Thomas Hubbard, Jr. 22 pp.

  • Hubbell, Levi. Oration delivered before the Young Men's Association of the city of Albany at the First Presbyterian Church, July 4, 1835. Albany, 1835. 18 pp.

  • Hunt, Benjamin Faneuil. An Oration, delivered by their appointment, before the Washington society, in Charleston, South-Carolina, on the 4th of July, 1839.. Charleston, 1839. 45 pp.

  • Hunter, William. An Oration, delivered in Trinity Church, in Newport on the Fourth of July, 1801. Newport, R.I, 1801. 31 pp.

  • Hunter, William. Oration pronounced before the citizens of Providence, on the Fourth of July, 1826, being the fiftieth anniversary of American Independence. 2d ed. Providence, 1826. 48 pp.

  • Hutchinson, Titus, 1771-1857. An Oration delivered at the South Parish in Woodstock, Vermont, on the fourth day of July, A.D. 1806, by Titus Hutchinson. 19 pp.

  • Hutchinson, Titus, 1771-1857. An Oration, delivered at Woodstock, July 4, 1809, by Titus Hutchinson. 8 pp.


    I
  • Ingersoll, Charles Jared, 1782-1862. An Oration, delivered at Mr. Harvey's, Spring Garden, before a very numerous meeting of democratic citizens, July 4, 1812, by Charles J. Ingersoll. 8 pp.

  • Irving, John T. (John Treat), 1778-1838. Orations delivered on the 4th of July, 1809, before the Tammany Society, or Columbian Order, Tailors' Society, Coopers' Society, Hatters' Society, Hibernian Prov. Society, Masons' Society, Shipwrights' Society, House-carpenters' Society, and Columbian Society, by John T. Irving. 23 pp.


    J
  • Jackson, John George, 1777-1825. An Oration pronounced in Clarksburg, on the Fourth Day of July, 1812 ..., by John G. Jackson. 8 pp.

  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872. An Oration, delivered at the county court-house, Philadelphia, on the forty-second anniversary of American independence, by Dr. Samuel Jackson published by particular request of the meeting. 12 pp. 23 cm.

  • Jackson, William. An Oration, to commemorate the Independence of the United States of North-America, delivered at the Reformed Calvinist church, in Philadelphia, ... Philadelphia, M,DCC,LXXXVI. 33 pp.

  • Jackson, William Ayrault. An Oration, delivered at Windham Centre, Greene county, N.Y., July 4, 1859. Albany, 1863. 24 pp.

  • James, Edwin. Oration delivered before the Young men's association of Brooklyn, N.Y., on the fourth of July, 1863. New York, 1863. 22 pp.

  • James, Henry. The social significance of our institutions: an Oration delivered by request of the citizens at Newport, R.I., July 4th, 1861. Boston, 1861. 47 pp.

  • Jarvis, William C. (William Charles). An Oration, delivered at Pittsfield, before the Washington benevolent society of the county of Berkshire, on the 4th July, 1812. Pittsfield [Mass.], 1812. 22 pp.
    "The laws of society are founded upon the principles which she inculcates; and the sons of men are made willing to obey the voice of the law from the doctrines which she reveals. It should, therefore, be the peculiar care of our rulers, to guard and protect a rational and true religion from the assaults of the licentious, and the attacks of fanaticism. And let those who administer our governments be careful how they tamper with the sacred ~institutions of our churches, lest they distroy the morality of their country, and do offence unto their God.
    "Upon this subject, too; the immortal Washington has not been silent: For you have read in the Legacy he has bequeathed, 'that of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports.'"

  • Johnson, John B. (John Barent). The Dealings of God with Israel and America: A Discourse delivered on the Fourth of July, 1798. Albany, 1798. 20 pp.
    "WHATEVER institutions may be instrumental to perpetuate the knowledge and cultivate the principle of those events which are intimately connected with the happiness of a nation; they cannot but receive greater dignity, and a more impressive solemnization from an union with religious observance. What can be more consonant to reason, than, on such occasions, to repair to the Temple of DEITY, and recognize him as the great and liberal benefactor, from whom all the comforts, relative both to this life and a future, descend? What more becoming, while we rejoice in the gift, than to acknowledge and adore the bountiful Giver?"
    ... "Let us therefore, my Countrymen, not only evince our gratitude to GOD for blessings past, but exercise in him an unshaken hope for the future. Let us aim at the true dignity of becoming a righteous, that so we may be an exalted people; and, taught by the song of inspiration, let us with rapture look forward to those halcyon days, when the tumults and horrors of war shall be known no more; when liberty and peace shall bless the nations; WHEN THE KINGDOMS OF THIS WORLD SHALL BECOME THE KINGDOMS OUR OUR LORD AND OF HIS CHRIST, AND HIS REIGN BE ESTABLISHED FOR EVER AND EVER. AMEN."

  • Johnson, William, 1771-1834. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on Saturday the Fourth of July, 1812, in commemoration of American independence by Wm. Johnson, Jun. 22 pp.

  • Jones, John F., of New York. Jones's New-York mercantile and general directory for the 30th year of American independence and of Our Lord, 1805-6, containing a variety of useful and interesting mercantile information and a complete register of the inhabitants of the city of New-York, with their occupations and places of residence ... by John F. Jones. xi, [19], [33]-429 pp. 19 cm.

  • Jones, Seth. An Oration pronounced at Augusta, Maine, before the young republicans of Augusta and Hallowell, on July fourth, 1806, in commemoration of American independence, by Seth Jones, Junior. 14 pp.

  • Jones, William. An Oration, pronounced at Concord, the fourth of July, 1794. Being the anniversary of the American independence. Printed at Concord, Massachusetts, MDCCXCIV. [1794].

  • Jordan, Ambrose Latting, 1789-1865. An Oration, pronounced at New-Lebanon, on the 4th of July, 1810 ..., by A.L. Jordan. 16 pp.


    K
  • Kean, Peter, 1787 or 8-1828. An Oration, delivered in the First Presbyterian Church at Elizabeth-town, N.J. on Saturday, July 4, 1812, by Peter Kean published by request. 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Kean, Peter, 1787 or 8-1828. An Oration pronounced in the Presbyterian Church at Connecticut Farms, N.J., before the citizens of the township of Union on the Fourth of July, 1818 by Peter Kean. 14 pp.

  • Kelley, William D. (William Darrah). An Address delivered at the Democratic town meeting, in the State house yard, July fourth, 1841.[Philadelphia], 1841. 16 pp.

  • Kellogg, Elijah. An Oration, pronounced at Portland, July 4, 1795 : being the birthday of Columbian freedom. Printed at Newburyport [Mass.], [1795]. 27 pp.

  • Kellogg, Giles B. (Giles Bacon). An Oration delivered July 4, 1829, before the Anti-Slavery Society of Williams College. Williamstown [Mass.], 1829. 22 pp.

  • Kendrick, Clark, 1775-1824. A sermon, delivered in the Baptist meeting-house, at Poultney, Vt., on the thirty-fourth anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1810 by Clark Kendrick published by special request. 12 pp.

  • Kennedy, James. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on the Fourth of July, 1801: in ... . Charleston, (South-Carolina), [1801]. 38 pp.

  • Kennedy, John H. (John Herron). Sympathy, its foundation and legitimate exercise considered, in special relation to Africa: a Discourse delivered on the fourth of July 1828, in ... Philadelphia, [1828]. 11 pp.

  • Ketchum, Hiram. An Oration, delivered on the public square at New Haven, at the request of its citizens, July 4, 1851. New Haven, 1851. 29 pp.

  • Keyes, Francis. An Oration delivered at Rumford, Oxford County, Maine, on the anniversary of American independence, July the fourth, 1807, by Francis Keyes. 8 pp.

  • Kidder, David. An Oration, pronounced at Bloomfield, Me., July 4th, 1814, by David Kidder. 15 pp.

  • Kimball, Jerome B. An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Providence, Friday, July 4, 1856. Providence, 1856. 49 pp.

  • King, A. Oration, delivered at Chatham, N.J., on the celebration of the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1805, by A. King. 8 pp.

  • King, Cyrus. An Oration, pronounced at Biddeford, on the fourth of July, 1798; the anniversary of American independence. At the request of the gentlemen of that and the adjoining town of Pepperellboro'; by whose desire this hasty production is submittted to the public. Cyrus King. [Portland, Me.], [1798].
  • King, Thomas Knight. An Oration delivered before the Kentish artillery and citizens of Apponaug, R.I., on the seventy-eighth anniversary of American Independence, ... Providence, 1854. 28 pp.

  • Kinney, Thomas T. An Oration, delivered in the First Presbyterian Church, Newark, New Jersey, on the Fourth of July, 1804, being the 28th anniversary of American independence by Thomas T. Kinney. 12 pp.

  • Kinsman, Henry Willis. An Oration, pronounced before the inhabitants of Boston, July the fourth, 1836, in commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of American ... Boston, 1836. 26 pp.

  • Kirk, Edward Norris. Oration of the Rev. Edward N. Kirk, delivered July 4, 1836, at the request of the committees of the Common council, civic societies, military ... Albany, 1836. 31 pp.

  • Knapp, Samuel L. (Samuel Lorenzo). An Oration, delivered at Newburyport, on the fourth day of July 1810. Newburyport [Mass.], [1810]. 16 pp.

  • Knight, Daniel. An Oration, pronounced at Charlton, Mass. on the forty-third anniversary of American independence, by Daniel Knight published by request. 20 pp. 22 cm.

  • Knight, Franklin. An Oration before the Democratic Republicans of Marblehead: delivered at their request, on the Fourth of July, 1834. Boston [Mass.], 1834. 23 pp.

  • Knowles, James D. (James Davis). Oration delivered at the Columbian College, in the District of Columbia, July 4, 1823. Washington City, 1823. 18 pp.

  • Knowles, James Davis. Perils and safeguards of American liberty: Address, pronounced July 4, 1828, in the Second Baptist meeting-house in Boston, at the religious ... Boston, [1828]. 28 pp.


    L
  • Ladd, William, 1778-1841. An Oration, pronounced at Minot, Maine, on the fourth day of July, 1814, by William Ladd. 32 pp. 23 cm.

  • Lance, William, 1791-1840. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1816, in St. Michael's Church, S.C., by appointment of the '76 Association, by William Lance. 21 pp.

  • Lance, William. An Oration: delivered in St. Andrew's church, on the Fourth of July, 1820, before the company of the parish, and at their request ... Charleston, 1820. 25 pp.

  • Langdon, Chauncy, 1763-1830. An Oration, delivered in the town of Poultney, on the Fourth of July, 1804, by Chauncey Langdon. 30 pp.

  • Langdon, Chauncy, 1763-1830. An Oration, delivered at Pawlet, for the Fourth of July, 1807, by Chauncey Langdon published at the request of the Committee of Arrangement. 26 pp. 22 cm.

  • Langdon, Chauncy. An Oration, pronounced at Poultney, July 4, 1808: being the thitry-third [!] anniversary of American Independence. Rutland, Vt., 1808. 32 pp.

  • Langdon, Chauncy. An Oration, delivered in Castleton at the celebration of the Fourth of July, A.D. 1812 . Middlebury [Vt.]: Printed by T.C. Strong, 1812. 35 pp. ; 22 x 13 cm.

  • Lathrop, John. An Oration, pronounced on the 4th day of July, 1798 : at the request of a number of the inhabitants of Dedham and its vicinity, in commemoration ... Dedham [Mass.], 1798. 17 pp.

  • Lathrop, Joseph. The happiness of a free government, and the means of preserving it: illustrated in a Sermon, delivered in West-Springfield, on July 4, 1794, in ... Springfield, Mass, 1794. 21 pp.

  • Lathrop, Joseph, 1731-1820. The happiness of a free government, and the means of preserving it, illustrated in a sermon, delivered in West-Springfield, on July 4, 1794, in commemoration of American independence by Joseph Lathrop published at the desire of the hearers. 23 pp.

  • Lee, Elisha. An Oration delivered at Lenox, the 4th July, 1793, the anniversary of American Independence. Stockbridge [Mass.], 1793. 14 pp.

  • Lee, Richard Bland, 1761-1827. An Oration delivered July 5, 1819, in the Chamber of the House of Representatives, by Richard Bland Lee. 15 pp. 19 cm.

  • Lee, Silas. An Oration, delivered at Wiscasset, at the request of the inhabitants, on the Fourth of July, 1799. By Silas Lee. [Two lines from Mallet du Pan]. Wiscasset [Me.], 1799.

  • Leightenberger, Yost. The Dutchman's oration, the substance of An Oration delivered at a public dinner, July 4th, 1815 by Yost Leightenberger. 10 pp.

  • Leland, John, 1754-1841. An Oration delivered at Cheshire, Massachusetts, July 5, 1802, on the celebration of American independence containing seventeen sketches and seventeen wishes by John Leland. 2nd ed. 16 pp.

  • Leland, John. An Elective judiciary: with other things, recommended in a speech, pronounced at Cheshire, July 4, 1805. Pittsfield, 1805. 21 pp.

  • Leland, John, 1754-1841. Politics sermonized, exhibited in Ashfield on July 4th, 1806 by John Leland. 22 pp. 20 cm.

  • Leland, John, 1754-1841. An Address to the young men of Cheshire, delivered July 4, 1808, by John Leland. 15 pp.

  • Leland, Sherman, 1783-1853. An Oration pronounced at Dorchester July 4, 1815, in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America, by Sherman Leland. 16 pp.

  • Leonard, David A. (David Augustus), 1771-1818. Oration, pronounced at Raynham, Monday, July 5, 1802 in commemoration of the Declaration of the independence of the United States of America by David A. Leonard. 30 pp.

  • Leonard, David A. (David Augustus), 1771-1818. An Oration, pronounced at Dighton, July 4, 1803, in commemoration of American independence, by David A. Leonard. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Leonard, George. A Sermon delivered at Windsor on Sunday, July 4, 1819. Windsor [Vt.], 1819. 20 pp.

  • Leonard, Samuel. The Substance of a Discourse delivered at Poultney, Vermont, in the new meeting house, on the Fourth of July, 1804, being the twenty-eighth anniversary of American independence by Samuel Leonard. 33 pp.

  • Leonard, Zenas L. (Zenas Lockwood), 1773-1841. An Oration pronounced at Southbridge, Massachusetts, July 4th, 1816, in commemoration of American independence, by Zenas L. Leonard. 20 pp.

  • Lester, C. Edwards (Charles Edwards). The Social life and national spirit of America: an Oration, delivered at Great Barrington, July 4, 1849. Great Barrington, Mass, 1849. 19 pp.

  • Lewis, Zechariah. An Oration, on the apparent, and the real political situation of the United States, pronounced before the Connecticut Society of Cincinnati, ... . New-Haven, 1799. 27 pp.

  • Lewis, Zechariah. An Oration, on the apparent, and the real political situation of the United States: pronounced before the Connecticut Society of Cincinnati, ... New-Haven, 1799. 27 pp.

  • Lincoln, Daniel Waldo. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, on the anniversary of American Independence, July 4th, 1805. Worcester [Mass.], 1805. 12 pp.

  • Lincoln, Daniel Waldo. An Oration, pronounced at Boston, on the fourth day of July, 1810: before the Bunker-Hill Association, and in presence of the supreme executive ... Boston, 1810. 21 pp.

  • Lincoln, Enoch. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, in commemoration of American Independence, July 4th, 1812. Worcester, Mass, 1812. 15 pp.

  • Lincoln, Levi. An Oration, pronounced at Brookfield (Mass.) upon the anniversary of American Independence, on the Fourth of July, 1807: before a numerous ... Worcester [Mass.], [1807]. 15 pp.

  • Lincoln, Solomon. An Oration delivered before the citizens of Hingham, on the Fourth of July, 1826. Hingham; (Hingham), 1826. 23 pp.

  • Lincoln, William, 1801-1843. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, Massachusetts, July 4th, 1816, in commemoration of American independence, before an assembly of youth by William Lincoln. 10 pp.

  • Linn, William. The Blessings of America. A Sermon, preached in the Middle Dutch Church, on the fourth July, 1791, being the anniversary of the Independence of ... .--New-York, M,DCC,XC,I. [1791]. 37 pp.

  • Livermore, Edward St. Loe. An Oration delivered July the fourth, 1813: at the request of the selectmen of Boston: in commemoration of American Independence. Boston, 1813. 40 pp.

  • Livermore, Jonathan. An Address pronounced at Wilton before the friends of the national administration: at the celebration of American Independence, July 4, 1828. Dunstable, N.H., 1828. 16 pp.

  • Livermore, Solomon Kidder, 1779-1859. An Oration pronounced at Temple (N.H.) in commemoration of American Independence, before the inhabitant of Temple ... July 4, 1809 by Solomon Kidder Livermore. 16 pp.

  • Livingston, Robert R. An Oration delivered before the Society of the Cincinnati of the state of New-York: in commemoration of the fourth day of July. New-York, 1787. 23 pp.

  • Locke, Joseph, 1772-1853. An Oration, pronounced at Billerica, July 5, 1802, in commemoration of the Declaration of American Independence by Joseph Locke. 20 pp.

  • Longfellow, Stephen. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1804, at the request of the selectmen of Portland: in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence.[Portland, Me.], [1804]. 15 pp.

  • Loring, George Bailey. Celebration at North Bridge, Salem, July 4th, 1862: Oration. Boston, 1862. 28 pp.

  • Loring, Jerome. An Oration, pronounced at Hingham, July 4, 1815, in commemoration of American Independence. Boston, 1815. 15 pp.

  • Loring, Nathaniel Hall. An Address, delivered at the request of the Republican committee of arrangements, on the anniversary of Independence, Fourth July, A.D. 1822: ... Boston, 1822. 24 pp.

  • Lothrop, Samuel Kirkland. Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston: on the Fourth of July, 1886. Boston, 1866. 69 pp. Also here.
    "We have a glorious past, a grand though troubled present, and a future rich in such hopes and promises as never before invited the energies, or met the honest, pure, noble ambition of any people. Nay, our patriotism should find its foundation and nourishment in religious faith, faith in God, faith in humanity, and faith in those great principles of liberty and love, with which Christianity, for eighteen centuries, has been striving to impregnate the heart of the world, and which, under the providence of God, have here a grander opportunity for development, expansion and application than was ever offered them before.
    "History is the unfolding of God's thought, the development of his purpose. Its epochs are the footprints of the Almighty on the sands of time. In our land, and in all that relates to it, these footprints are so distinct and impressive that we must be infidel indeed, if we do not mark and study them with reverence and gratitude.
    "The hand of God in our country, the tokens of his benignant purpose to protect and advance in it the interests of liberty and humanity, is a theme for whose details volumes would be required; the few paragraphs of an oration can only sketch the outline."

  • Lowell, John. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1799, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, 1799. 25 pp.

  • Lunt, George. An Oration delivered before the Newburyport Artillery Company upon their fifty-eighth anniversary, July 4th, 1836.[Newburyport, Mass.], 1836. 24 pp.

  • Lyman, Jonathan H. (Jonathan Huntington), 1783-1825. An Oration, delivered at Northampton, July 6, 1807, on the anniversary celebration of American independence, at the request of the Committee of Arrangements by Jonathan H. Lyman. 23 pp. 22 cm.

  • Lyman, Theodore. An Oration delivered at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston: on the anniversary of American Independence, in the year 1820. Boston, [1820]. 20 pp.

  • Lyon, Asa, 1763-1841. An Oration delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society of the County of Grand-Isle, at South-Hero, on the sixth day of July 1812 by Asa Lyon. 20 pp.

  • Lyon, Charles H. (Charles Harrison). Oration delivered in a grove, near the ground on which Major Andre was taken, at Tarrytown, on the Fourth of July, 1839. New York, 1839. 15 pp.


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  • Mack, Ebenezer. An Oration, delivered before the New-York Typographical Society, on the fifth of July, 1813, in celebration of the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence, and fourth of the Society by Ebenezer Mack. 16 pp. 24 cm.

  • Mackie, John, 1780-1833. An Oration, delivered in the meeting house in Wareham, at the request of the inhabitants in celebration of the anniversary of American independence, on the Fourth day of July, 1804 by John Mackie. 23 pp.

  • Maclay, William B. (William Brown). An Address delivered before the Peithologian Society, on Saturday, the Fourth of July, 1835. New-York, 1835. 16 pp.

  • Maclay, William B. (William Brown). An Oration delivered before the Literary Association, on Monday, the Fourth of July, 1836. New-York, 1836. 19 pp.

  • MacLeod, Alexander. Na [sic] oration delivered at Georgetown, S.C., on the 4th day of July, 1816, by Alexander MacLeod. 17 pp.

  • Macomber, Job, 1737-1821. A poem, delivered in Bowdoinham, to a respectable audience, on the Fourth of July, 1806, it being the anniversary of American independence, by Job Macomber. 10 pp. 18 cm.

  • MacMaster, E. D. (Erasmus Darwin). The true life of a nation: an Address, delivered at the invitation of the Erodelphian and Eccritean societies of Miami university, the evening ... New Albany [Ind.?], 1856. 46 pp.

  • Maffitt, John Newland. A Plea for Africa: a Sermon delivered at Bennet Street Church, in behalf of the American Colonization Society, July 4, 1830. Boston, 1830. 13 pp.

  • Magaw, Samuel. A Sermon delivered in St. Paul's church, on the 4th of July, 1786 ... Philadelphia, M.DCC.LXXX.VI. 30 pp.

  • Magoon, Elias Lyman. Oration delivered July 4th, 1848, at the laying of the corner stone of the Ohio Mechanics' Institute, Cincinnati. Cincinnati, 1848. 23 pp.

  • Magruder, William. An Oration pronounced on the 5th of July, at the New Theatre, before the Washington Society of Maryland, and published at their request, by William Magruder. 16 pp. 21 cm.

  • Mallary, Rollin C. (Rollin Carolas), 1784-1831. An Oration, pronounced at the Republican celebration of our national independence, at Poultney (Vt.) July 4, 1810, by Rollin C. Mallary published by request of the committee. 20 pp.

  • Mallary, Rollin C. (Rollin Carolas), 1784-1831. An Oration, addressed to Republicans, assembled at Poultney, Vermont, July 4, 1814, by R.C. Mallary published by request of the auditors. 19 pp. 21 cm.

  • Mallary, Rollin C. (Rollin Carolas), 1784-1831. An Oration addressed to an assembly of citizens at Whitehall, N.Y., July 4, 1817, by Rollin C. Mallary. 16 pp.

  • Mallary, Rollin Carolus. An Oration pronounced at Rutland, Fourth July, 1826: being the fiftieth anniversary of American Independence, and the year of jubilee. Rutland [Vt.], [1826]. 24 pp.

  • Man, George Flagg. An Oration, delivered before the citizens of the county of Kent, at Apponang, Warwick, July 4, 1838. Providence, 1838. 24 pp.

  • Mann, Horace. An Oration delivered before the authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1842. Boston, 1842. 85 pp.

  • Mann, James, 1759-1832. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1801 at the request of a number of the inhabitants of Wrentham in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by James Mann. 20 pp.

  • Manning, Jacob M. (Jacob Merrill). Peace under liberty: Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston on the Fourth of July, 1865: together with an account of the ... Boston, 1865. 104 pp.

  • Mansfield, Jacob. An Oration, pronounced at Western, in commemoration of American independence, July 4th, 1812, by Jacob Mansfield published by request. 12 pp. 20 cm.

  • Manwaring, Christopher. Republicanism & aristocracy contrasted, or, The steady habits of Connecticut inconsistent with and opposed to the principles of the American ... Norwich, Conn., [1804]. 14 pp.

  • Mansfield, Jacob. An Oration, pronounced at Belchertown on the 4th of July 1811, by J. Mansfield. 16 pp.

  • Manwaring, Christopher, 1774-1832. Individual and national dependance [sic] and independence considered, together with observations on the present state of the times, exhibited in an Address, delivered at New-London, Conn., July 4, 1808 by Christopher Manwaring. 29 pp. 21 cm.

  • Marchant, William. An Oration, pronounced at Newport, in the state of Rhode-Island, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1797. By William Marchant. [Two lines of quotation]. . Newport [R.I.], 1797. 18 pp.

  • Markley, Benjamin A. An Oration, delivered on the 4th July, 1809, in commemoration of American independence, before the Independent Greens and German Fusileers of Charleston, S.C. by B. A. Markley. 27 pp.

  • Markley, Benjamin A. An Oration, delivered on 4th July, 1811, in commemoration of American independence, before the '76 Association, Charleston, South Carolina by Benjamin A. Markley published by request. 24 pp.

  • Marshall, James. An Oration commemorative of the anniversary of American independence, delivered at the Filature, in Savannah, on the Fourth of July by Captain James Marshall. 15 pp.

  • Mason, Moses, 1757-1837. An Oration, pronounced before a respectable audience at Bethel, Maine, in commemoration of our national independence, July 4th, 1809, by Moses Mason, Junior. 12 pp.

  • Mason, William Powell. An Oration delivered Wednesday, July 4, 1827, in commemoration of American Independence, before the supreme executive of the commonwealth, and ... Boston, 1827. 30 pp.

  • Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Supreme Executive of the State, in compliance with a Resolve of the Legislature, of June, 1786, will assemble on the Fourth Day of July next, to celebrate the Anniversary of the Declaration of the Independence of the United States of America. June 24, 1816. Broadside.

  • Mathews, Philip. An Oration, delivered on the 5th July, 1813, in the Episcopal church of St. Helen, by Philip Mathews published at the unanimous request of the congregation, as expressive of their sentiments. 31 pp. 20 cm.

  • Matthews, John, 1772-1848. Memorial of independence, a Discourse delivered in the Presbyterian church, in Shepherds-Town, Va., on Tuesday, the Fourth of July, 1815 by John Matthews. 23 pp. 20 cm.

  • Mauger, John Jersey. An Oration, delivered in the French Calvinistic church, on the fifth of July, 1819 ... in commemoration of American independence, by John Jersey Mauger. 19 pp. 20 cm.

  • Maxcy, Jonathan. An Oration, delivered in the Baptist meeting-house in Providence, July 4, A.D. 1795, at the celebration of the nineteenth anniversary of American ... Providence, 1795. 18 pp.

  • Maxcy, Jonathan. An Oration, delivered in the First Congregational Meeting-House, in Providence, on the fourth of July, 1799. By Jonathan Maxcy, A.M. ... . Providence, 1799. 15 pp.

  • Maxcy, Jonathan, 1768-1820. A Discourse, delivered in the chapel of the South-Carolina College, July 4th, A.D. 1819 by Jonathan Maxcy. 2nd ed. 18 pp.

  • Maxcy, Milton. An Oration, delivered in the Dutch church in Schenectady, at the request of the Philomathean Society, on the 4th of July, 1803. Albany, [N.Y.], 1803. 23 pp.

  • Maynadier, William. An Oration prepared for delivery before the Corps of Cadets, at West-Point: on the fiftieth anniversary of American Independence. Newburgh, N.Y, 1826. 14 pp.

  • McCall, Hext. An Oration, delivered in St. Michael's church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on the Fourth of July, 1810: in ... Charleston, 1810. 27 pp.

  • M'Donald, John, d. 1821. Ebenezer, or, Jehovah the helper of America, a sermon, delivered in the capitol, July 4, 1814 being the anniversary of the independence of America by the desire of the corporation of the city of Albany, and published at their request by John M'Donald. 38 pp.

  • McKay, Samuel M. An Address, delivered at the request of the Republican Committee of Arrangements, at Pittsfield, on the anniversary of American Independence, ... . Pittsfield [Mass.?], 1822. 20 pp.

  • M'Knight, John, 1754-1823. God the author of promotion, a sermon preached in the New Presbyterian Church, New-York, on the 4th July, 1794, at the request of the Democratic Society and the military officers. New-York: From the Press of William Durell, no. 208, Pearl-Street., 1794. 24 pp.; 20 cm. (8vo)

  • McLane, Louis, 1786-1857. Oration delivered before the Artillery Company of Wilmington, commanded by Captain Rodney, on the 5th of July, A.D. 1813, by Louis M'Lane. 23 pp. 20 cm.

  • McNiece, John. An Oration, delivered on the fifth of July, 1802, at Stephentown, New-York by John McNiece. 15 pp.

  • Mead, Samuel. An Oration delivered in Amesbury, July 4, 1817, commemorative of American independence, by Samuel Barlow Mead. 16 pp.

  • Meech, Asa, 1775-1849. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1805, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Bridgewater, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, by Asa Meech. 16 pp.

  • Member. Ode for the Fourth of July, 1817, by a member. 1 broadside.

  • Merrick, Pliny. An Oration, delivered at Worcester, July 4, 1817: the forty-first anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. Worcester, 1817. 14 pp.

  • Merrill, O. C. (Orsamus Cook), 1775-1865. The happiness of America, An Oration, delivered at Shaftsbury on the Fourth of July, 1804 being the twenty-ninth [i.e. twenty-eighth] anniversary of American independence by O.C. Merrill published by particular request. 27 pp. 22 cm.

  • Merrill, O. C. (Orsamus Cook). An Oration: delivered at the meeting-house in Bennington, on the 4th of July, 1806. Bennington [Vt.] : Printed by Benjamin Smead, [1806] 56 pp.; 17 cm.

  • Messer, Asa. An Oration, delivered at Providence, in the Baptist meeting-house, on the Fourth of July, 1803. Providence, [1803]. 14 pp.

  • Metcalf, Theron. An Oration, pronounced at Dedham, July 4th, 1810: the thirty fourth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1810. 19 pp.

  • Miller, Samuel. A Sermon, preached in New-York, July 4th, 1793: being the anniversary of the Independence of America: at the request of the Tammany society, or Columbian Order. New-York, [1793]. 37 pp.

  • Miller, Samuel. A Sermon, delivered in the New Presbyterian Church, New-York, July fourth, 1795: being the nineteenth anniversary of the Independence of America: at the request of, and before, the Mechanic, Tammany, and Democratic Societies, and the military officers. By Samuel Miller, A.M. One of the Ministers of the United Presbyterian Churches, in the city of New-York. New-York: Printed by Thomas Greenleaf, 1795. 32 pp.

  • Mills, Edmund, 1753?-1825. An Oration, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, pronounced at the First Congregational meeting-house, in Sutton, in the audience of the inhabitants ... July 4th, 1809 by Edmund Mills. 16 pp.

  • Mills, Oliver. An Oration delivered at Barkhamstead at the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1815, by Oliver Mills. 16 pp.

  • Miltimore, James. An Oration in commemoration of the Independence of federate America: delivered in Stratham, July 4th, 1806. Exeter [N.H.], 1806. 16 pp.

  • Miltimore, James, 1755-1836. An Address in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America, delivered in the new meeting-house, in High Street, Newbury, at the request of a respectable company of American citizens, united for celebrating the anniversary festival of July 4th, 1808 by James Miltimore. 15 pp. 22 cm.

  • Miner, Charles. The Olive branch, or, The evil and the remedy. Philadelphia, 1856. 33 pp.

  • Mitchell, Nelson. Oration delivered before the Fourth of July Association, on the fourth of July, 1848. Charleston, 1849. 28 pp.

  • Mitchill, Samuel L. (Samuel Latham), 1764-1831. An Address to the citizens of New-York: who assembled in the Brick Presbyterian church, to celebrate the twenty-third anniversary of American ... New York, 1800. 27 pp.

  • Mitchill, Samuel L. (Samuel Latham). Address to the Fredes, (the modern and appropriate name of the people of the United States, is Fredes or Fredonians, as the geographical name of their country is Fredon or Fredonia, and their relations are expressed by the terms fredonian or fredism), or people of the United States, on the 28th anniversary of their independence. 8 pp.

  • M'Knight, John. God the author of promotion: A Sermon preached in the new Presbyterian church, New-York, on the 4th July, 1794, at the request of the Democratic ... New-York, M,DCC,XCIV. 23 pp.
    "TO-DAY, my brethren, we recognise this truth as verified in our own happy experience. On this the birth-day of AMERICAN LIBERTY and INDEPENDENCE, whilst, with gratitude and joy, we commemorate the great deliverance which has been wrought out for us, and survey the inumerable and inestimable blessings which we possesss, or have in prospect; we acknoledge the Great Sovereign of the Universe as they Author of them all; renouncing their imputation to the influence of any second causes farther than as instruments in his hand for the accomplishment of his purposes."

  • Moore, Humphrey. An Address delivered before the temperance society in Pembroke, July 4, 1836. Concord [N.H.], 1836. 15 pp.
    ... "Our fathers were moved at the same time by one and the same principle, --a sense of injuries, a sense of rights, a sense of civil liberty; a principle, which could no more be expunged from their bosoms by a tyrant's arms than the laws of nature could be controled by the laws of the State. This principle not only united them in sentiment and in feeling, but it united them in their counsels, in their decisions; collected them into one body, and brought all their powers to bear against one common object, the oppression of their country; and He, who governs the world by righteous laws, gave success to their combined and well- directed efforts; and by his power and grace we are this day what we are.

  • Moore, Zephaniah Swift. An Oration on the anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America: pronounced at Worcester, Monday, July 5, 1802. Worcester, Mass, 1802. 23 pp.
    "CITIZENS of a country, the freest and happiest the world has hitherto seen, a country which has been the peculiar favorite of Heaven, and in whose history are recorded many signal interpofitions of Divine Providence, we have motives innumerable to gratitude and obedience to the Supreme Ruler. Let us maintain a deep and habitual reverence for his government in which it is a fixed maxim, 'That righteousness exalteth a nation; but sin is a reproach to any people.' Let us revere the Christian Religion, as being above everything else adapted to the Preservation of our freedom and systems of policy; as affording the only ground, on which to hope for an amelioration of the condition of man; and as enabling us to look forward with confolation and transport, to rising periods of order, peace, and safety, in which truth shall triumph, justice preside over the concerns of men, and benevolence reign in every heart."

  • Morell, George, 1786-1845. An Oration delivered at Lenox, July 4th, 1808, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by George Morel. 20 pp.

  • Morris, Gouverneur. An Oration, delivered July 5th, 1813, before the Washington Benevolent Society, of the City of New-York, in commemoration of American Independence. New-York; ([New York]), 1813. 25 pp.
    "And, even if the rest of the world should suppose that the eye of Omniscience could be closed in sleep, we, at least, should remember that we owed our deliverance to an Almighty arm. This day should admonish us that we, more than all others, should endeavour, by a conduct scrupulously just, to secure the Divine assistance."

  • Morse, Asahel. An Oration, delivered at Winsted, July 5th, A.D. 1802: in commemoration of the declaration of our national independence, on the memorable fourth of July, A.D. 1776 / by Asahel Morse. Hartford [Conn.]: John Babcock, printer, 1802. 15 pp.

  • Morse, Ebenezer Belknap, 1783-1824. An Oration, pronounced at Westborough, (Mass.) on July 4th, 1804, in commemoration of American independence, by Ebenezer Belknap Morse. 12 pp.

  • Morton, Andrew, 1772-1805. An Oration, pronounced at Hampden, on the Fourth of July--1803 by Andrew Morton. 16 pp.

  • Morton, Ellis W. (Ellis Wesley). An Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston: on the fifth of July, 1869, in celebration of the ninety-third anniversary of ... Boston, 1869. 30 pp.

  • Morton, Marcus. An Oration on American Independence: delivered before the Republican citizens of Bristol County, Mass., at Taunton, July fourth, 1809. New-Bedford [Mass.], 1809. 20 pp.

  • Moseley, Ebenezer. An Oration, pronounced at Newburyport July 4, 1808, on the anniversary celebration of American Independence: at the request of the Federal Republicans. Newburyport [Mass.], 1808. 20 pp.

  • Mudge, Enoch, 1776-1850. An Oration, pronounced at Orrington, July 4th, 1808, in celebration of the thirty-second anniversary of American independence by Enoch Mudge. 14 pp. 21 cm.

  • Mumford, Paul. An Oration, spoken in the second Baptist meeting house, at Newport, on the Fourth of July, 1801: Pursuant to a vote of the town / by Paul Mumford. Newport [R.I.]: Printed by Oliver Farnsworth, 1801. 23, [1] pp.

  • Mussey, R. D. (Reuben Dimond), 1780-1866. An Oration, together with an Address to the Ipswich Light Infantry, pronounced in the second parish at Ipswich, Mass., on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1807 by Reuben D. Mussey. 24 pp. 24 cm.


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  • National Lincoln Monument Association. Celebration by the Colored People's Educational Monument Association in memory of Abraham Lincoln: on the Fourth of July, 1865, in the ... Washington, D.C, 1865. 33 pp.

  • Newburyport, Mass. The Addresses of other proceedings at the laying of the corner stone of the new town hall in Newburyport, July 4th, 1850. Newburyport [Mass.], 1850. 24 pp.

  • New Orleans. City celebration of the anniversary of the national Independence, Lafayette Square, New Orleans, La., July 4th, 1864.

  • Newport, R.I. American Independence. Order of performance at the Second Baptist Meeting-House in Newport. On the Fourth of July, 1809. Newport [R.I. : s.n.], 1809. 1 broadside.

  • Newton, Rejoice. An Oration, delivered at Worcester, Mass. on the fourth of July, 1814. Worcester [Mass.], 1814. 24 pp.

  • Newman, S. C. (Sylvanus Chace). An Address delivered at the formation of the Blackstone Monument Association: together with the preliminaries, and proceedings at Study Hill. Pawtucket, R.I.; (Pawtucket, R.I.), 1855. 41 pp.

  • Newman, S. C. (Sylvanus Chace). Rehoboth in the past: an Historical Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1860, completing two hundred and sixteen years of its history. Pawtucket [R.I.], 1860. 105 pp.

  • Nichols, Benjamin Ropes, 1786-1848. An Oration delivered on the fifth of July, 1813, in the North Church in Salem, in commemoration of American independence, by Benjamin R. Nichols. 24 pp.

  • Nichols, I. (Ichabod), 1784-1859. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1805, at the North meeting house, in Salem, Massachusetts, by Ichabod Nichols. 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Nichols, William, Jr. An Oration delivered at West-Cambridge, July 4, 1808, in commemoration of the annivrsary of American independence by William Nichols, Jun. 21 pp.

  • Nichols, William, Jr. An Oration pronounced at Dracutt, Mass., July 4th, 1810, by William Nichols, Jun. 12 pp.

  • Noah, M. M. (Mordecai Manuel), 1785-1851. Oration delivered by appointment before Tammany Society of Columbian Order, Hibernian Provident Society, ... and Mason's benevolent societies, united to celebrate the forty first anniversary of American independence by M.M. Noah. 24 pp. 20 cm.

  • North, Selah. An Oration delivered at Goshen, July 4th, 1817, in commemoration of the declaration of American independence by Selah North. 14 pp.

  • Nott, Eliphalet, 1773-1866. A Discourse delivered in the Presbyterian church, in Albany, the Fourth of July, A.D. 1801 at the celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of American independence by Eliphalet Nott. 26 pp. 20 cm.

  • Nourse, Gabriel. The Glorious spirit of '76, being a collection of patriotic and philanthropic addresses on the anniversary of American independence to which is added a funeral oration on ... Gen. George Washington with an Address on the present state of America, the whole ... designed for schools by Gabriel Nourse. 32 pp. ill.
  • Noyes, John, 1764-1846. An Oration delivered in Brattleborough, July 4th--1811, by John Noyes. 13 pp. 24 cm.


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  • Ogden, Lewis Morris, 1783-1810. An Oration, delivered in the Presbyterian Church at Newark, July 4th, 1803 by Lewis Morris Ogden. 12 pp.

  • Ormsbee, Joseph. An Oration in commemoration of the American independence, delivered in Counth, on the 4th of July, 1808 by Joseph Ormsbee. 12 pp.

  • Orr, Hector, 1770-1855. An Oration, pronounced at Bridgewater, July 4, 1804, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Hector Orr. 19 pp. 21 cm.

  • Osborn, Selleck, 1783-1826. An Oration commemorative of American independence, delivered to a Republican audience at New-Bedford, Mass., July fourth, 1810, by Selleck Osborn. 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Osborn, Selleck, 1783-1826. An Oration, in commemoration of American independence, pronounced at Windsor, Vt. July 4, 1816, by Selleck Osborn. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Osgood, Joseph Otis, d. 1845. An Oration commemorative of American independence, pronounced at Salisbury, July fourth, 1810, by Joseph Otis Osgood. 16 pp. 20 cm.

  • Osgood, Nathan. An Oration, delivered at Rutland; in the state of Vermont, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1799. Rutland [Vt.]: Printed [by John Walker, Jun.] for S. Williams., 1799. 16, [2] p. 21 cm.

  • Osgood, Samuel. An Oration, delivered on the fourth day of July, 1839, before the citizens of Nashua, without distinction of party. Nashua [N.H.], 1839. 39 pp.

  • Otis, William F. (William Foster). An Oration delivered before the "Young Men of Boston," on the Fourth of July, MDCCCXXXI. Boston, 1831. 36 pp.

  • Otis, William F. (William Foster). The Reviewer reviewed: a defence of An Oration delivered before the "Young Men of Boston," on the fourth of July, 1831. Boston, 1831. 30 pp.


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  • Packard, Asa, 1758-1843. An Oration, on the means of perpetuating independence, delivered at East-Sudbury, July 4th, 1815 by Asa Packard. 15 pp. 25 cm.

  • Page, John, 1744-1808. An Oration, delivered at Gloucester Courthouse, on July the Fourth, 1794. 30 pp.

  • Page, Timothy, d. 1810. Conciliation an Oration, pronounced on the anniversary of American independence, before a large audience convened at Shoreham, July 5, 1802. 20 pp.

  • Paige, Reed, 1764-1816. An Oration, pronounced in Hancock, July 4th, 1803, in commemoration of the declaration of the independence of the United States of America by Reed Paige. 20 pp. ? cm.

  • Paine, Charles. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1801, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, [1801]. 22 pp.

  • Paine, Charles. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1801, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence. Boston: Manning & Loring, [1801]. 24 pp.; 21 cm.

  • Paine, Emerson. An Oration, pronounced before the students of Brown University: at the First Congregational Meeting-House in Providence, July 5, 1813 : in ... Providence [R.I.], 1813. 30 pp.

  • Paine, Robert Treat, 1773-1811. Ode for the Fourth of July, 1811. By Robert Treat Paine, Esq. Tune--"Battle of the Nile." 1 sheet ([1] p.) 47 x 15 cm.

  • Palfrey, John Gorham. An Oration pronounced before the citizens of Boston, on the anniversary of the declaration of American Independence, July 4th, 1831. Boston, 1831. 43 pp.

  • Palmer, Eluhu. An Enquiry relative to the moral & political improvement of the human species: an Oration, delivered in the city of New-York on the fourth of ... New-York, 1797. 35 pp.

  • Palmer, Stephen, 1766-1821. A sermon delivered at Mansfield, July 31, 1808, being the fourth Lord's Day, after the internment of the Rev. Roland Green ... who died July 4, 1808, in the 71st year of his age by Stephen Palmer. 32 pp.

  • Parburt, George R. Oration, delivered on board the ship Sylph in the Pacific Ocean, July 4, 1849: together with a brief account of her voyage from Panama to San ... Geneva, N.Y, 1849. 29 pp.

  • Pardee, Benjamin D. Two orations, and poetry on different subjects, by Benjamin D. Pardee. 77 pp. 16 cm.

  • Parke, Jason. An Oration delivered at Woodstock, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1803, before the Society of Columbian Brothers, and the citizens of the First Society in Woodstock, in commemoration of American independence by Jason Parke. 12 pp. 22 cm.

  • Parker, Daniel, 1782-1846. An Oration, pronounced at Charlestown, on the thirtieth anniversary, of American independence, by Daniel Parker. 20 pp. 21 cm.

  • Parish, Elijah. An Oration delivered at Byfield July 4, 1799. Newburyport [Mass.], [1799]. 17 pp.

  • Parish, Elijah, 1762-1825. An Oration, delivered at the request of the officers, before the First regiment in the Second brigade of the Second division of militia in the commonwealth, at Bayfield, July 4, 1805 by Elijah Parish. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Park, Samuel. American antiquities: read before a joint meeting of the pioneer associations of the counties of Franklin, Muskingum and Licking, at their ... Terre-Haute, 1870. 22 pp.

  • Parker, Edward G. (Edward Griffin). The lesson of '76 to the men of '56 : an Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston at the celebration of the ... Boston, 1856. 33 pp.

  • Parker, Leonard M. (Lenoard Moody). An Oration, pronounced at Charlestown, Massachusetts, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1816 : by request of the Republican citizens of Middlesex. Boston, 1816. 15 pp.

  • Parmelee, David L. (David Lewis), 1795-1865. An Address, delivered at Goshen ... 4th of July, 1814, at the desire of the young men of the town by David L. Parmelee. 23 pp.

  • Paterson, William B. An Oration, delivered February 22d, 1815, before the New-Jersey Washington Benevolent Society, in the city of New-Brunswick. by William B. Paterson. New-Brunswick [N.J.]: Printed by L. Deare & G. L. Austin, and sold at their respective offices, 1815. 19 pp.

  • Peabody, William Bourn Oliver. An Address delivered at Springfield before the Hampden Colonization Society, July 4th, 1828. Springfield [Mass.], 1828. 15 pp. Also here.
    "The condition and present success of our parent society may be learned from the public prints; I have therefore thought it more important to try to excite an interest in the subject generally, than to give you a history of their exertions. My subject is, the reason of the imperfect influence of Christianity on the public relations of men."

  • Peale, Charles Willson, 1741-1827. Address delivered by Charles W. Peale, to the corporation and citizens of Philadelphia, on the 18th day of July, 1816, in Academy Hall, Fourth Street,. 23 pp. 22 cm.

  • Peirce, Benjamin. An Oration, delivered at Salem, on the fourth of July, 1812 / by Benjamin Peirce. Salem [Mass.]: Printed by Thomas C. Cushing, 1812. 23 pp.; 21 cm. Also here.

  • Peirce, I. B. An Oration delivered before the Newport Morale and Literary Association ... on the Fourth of July, 1808, by I.B. Peirce. 20 pp.

  • Pendleton, Nathaniel Greene. Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1831, before the citizens of Cincinnati: in the Methodist Church, on Sixth Street. Cincinnati, 1831. 27 pp.

  • Pepper, Calvin. An Oration, pronounced at Wilbraham on the 4th of July, 1810. Palmer [Mass.], [1810?]. 11 pp.

  • Perkins, Charles. An Oration, pronounced at the request of the citizens of Norwich, Conn.: on the anniversary of American Independence, July 4th, 1822. Norwich [Conn.], 1822. 24 pp.

  • Perkins, Matthew, 1788-1826. An Oration, delivered at the meeting-house in Sandbornton, New-Hampshire, to the Washington Benevolent Society, on the fifth day of July 1813, by Matthew Perkins. 10 pp.

  • Perkins, Simeon, 1795-1842. An Oration on Columbian Independence, delivered in Minot, Me., on the anniversary of that memorable day, the Fourth of July, 1818, being the forty-second of the independence of the U.S.A. by Simeon Perkins. 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Perley, Jeremiah, 1784-1834. An Anniversary oration delivered before the Federal Republicans of Hallowell ... July Fourth, 1807, by Jeremiah Perley. 24 pp.

  • Pettibone, Augustus. An Oration, pronounced at Norfolk, on the anniversary of American independence, Fourth of July, 1798. . / By Augustus Pettibone; Published by request. Printed at Litchfield [Conn.]: by T. Collier, 1798. 16 pp.; (8vo)

  • Pettibone, Sereno, 1778?-1826. An Oration, delivered at Norfolk, at the celebration of American independence, 6th July, 1801 by Sereno Pettibone. 20 pp.

  • Phelps, John, 1777-1849. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1811, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Guilford, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by John Phelps, Esq. 16 pp.

  • Phillips, John. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1794, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, 1794. 18 pp.

  • Phillips, Stephen C. (Stephen Clarendon). An Oration, delivered at the request of the young men of Salem: July 4, 1831. Salem [Mass.], 1831. 40 pp.

  • Pickering, John. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1804 : at St. Peter's Church in Salem, Massachusetts: in commemoration of the Independence of the ... Salem, 1804. 22 pp.

  • Pickering, Timothy. Col. Pickering's Observations introductory to reading the Declaration of Independence: at Salem, July 4, 1823. Salem, 1823. 12 pp.

  • Pidgin, William, 1772-1848. A Discourse, delivered in Minot, July 4, 1811, in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America by William Pidgin. 19 pp.

  • Pierce, William Leigh, 1789 or 90-1814. Oration on American Independence delivered in the Presbyterian Church, Savannah, Geo.: on the Fourth of July, 1812, by appointment of the Savannah Volunteer Guards, and published at their request. Savannah: Printed by John J. Evans, on the Bay, 1812. 20 pp.; 21 cm.

  • Pilmore, Joseph. The blessings of peace: a sermon, preached in Christ's Church, New-York, on the Fourth of July, 1794. At the joint request of the Tammany Society or, Columbian Order, and the Society of Mechanics. By the Rev. Joseph Pilmore. New-York, MDCCXCIV. [1794].

  • Pinckney, Henry Laurens, 1794-1863. An Oration, delivered in St. Michael's Church, before an assemblage of the inhabitants of Charleston, South Carolina, on the Fourth of July, 1818, in commemoration of American independence, by appointment of the '76 Association, and published at the request of that Society by Henry Laurens Pinckney. 29 pp.

  • Pinckney, Henry Laurens. An Oration, delivered in the Independent, or Congregational Church, Charleston: before the State Rights & Free Trade Party, the State Society of ... Charleston, 1833. 56 pp.

  • Pitman, John. An Oration pronounced July 4th, 1812, at the request of the Republicans of the town of Salem by John Pitman, Jun. Salem [Mass.]: Warwick Palfray, 1812. 23 pp.

  • Plumer, William. An Address delivered at Portsmouth, N.H. on the Fourth of July, 1828. Portsmouth [N.H.], 1828. 24 pp.

  • Plummer, Jonathan, 1761-1819. The Portsmouth Harbour tragedy, by Jonathan Plummer, a travelling preacher, physician, & poet. An elegiac ode & funeral sermon, on the deaths of eight persons, killed, or mortally wounded, at Fort Constitution, in Portsmouth Harbour, on the Fourth of July, 1809 . 1 sheet ([1] p.) ill.

  • Polk, Robert. Oration delivered in George Town, Columbia, on the Fourth of July, 1807, by Robert Polk. 17 pp.

  • Pope, Elnathan. An Oration delivered in the First Congregational Meeting-House in Rochester on the fourth day of July, 1809, by Elnathan Pope. 12 pp.

  • Pope, Joseph, 1778-1852. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1804, before the citizens of the town of Windham, Maine in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Joseph Pope. 24 pp.

  • Porter, John Ewing. An Oration, in commemoration of the American independence, delivered agreeably to an appointment on the Lysian Society, on Wednesday, July the Fourth, 1804 by John Ewing Porter. 16 pp.

  • Porter, Nathaniel, 1745-1836. A Discourse delivered at Conway, N.H. on the Fourth of July, 1811, by Nathaniel Porter. 17 pp. 23 cm.

  • Porter, Robert. An Oration, to commemorate the independence of the United States of North-America; delivered at Zion Church, in Fourth-Street, Philadelphia, July 4th, 1791; and now published at the request of the Pennsylvania Society of the Cincinnati. By Robert Porter, A.M. Philadelphia, M,DCC,XCI. [1791]. 23 pp.

  • Post, Martin. An Oration delivered at Cornwall, on the 5th day of July, A.D. 1802, for the anniversary of American Independence. Middlebury [Vt.], 1802. 17 pp.

  • Post, Martin, 1778-1811. An Oration delivered at Jerico, on the anniversary of American independence, July fourth, eighteen hundred and four, by Martin Post. 24 pp.

  • Power, Thomas. An Oration, delivered at Warwick, Mass., July 4th, A.D. 1815 : before the Washington Benevolent Societies and a large number of citizens.[Boston?], [1815]. 22 pp.

  • Power, Thomas. An Oration delivered by request of the city authorities, before the citizens of Boston, on the sixty fourth anniversary of American Independence, ... Boston, 1840. 30 pp.

  • Powers, Grant, 1784-1841. An Oration pronounced in the meeting house at Thetford, Vt., upon the thirty sixth anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1812 by Grant Powars. 16 pp.

  • Pratt, John Horace. An authentic account of all the proceedings on the Fourth of July, 1815, with regard to laying the corner stone of the Washington monument, now erecting in the city of Baltimore, accompanied by an engraving of the monument ... and a biographical sketch of General Washington. 44 p., 1 folded leaf of plates 21 cm.

  • Pratt, Spencer. An Oration pronounced at Norridgwock, on the Fourth of July, 1805, being the anniversary of American independence by Spencer Pratt. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Prentiss, Samuel. An Oration, pronounced at Plainfield, July 4, 1812, before the Washington Benevolent Societies of Montpelier, Calais, Plainfield, and Barre: ... Montpelier, Vt, 1812. 38 pp.

  • Prentiss, Thomas. A Discourse, delivered at Medfield, in commemoration of American Independence, July 4, 1799. Dedham [Mass.], 1799. 21 pp.

  • Prescott, Edward G. (Edward Goldsborough). An Oration, delivered before the officers of the militia, and members of the volunteer companies of Boston and the vicinity, on the Fourth of ... Boston, 1832. 30 pp.

  • Prescott, Edward G. (Edward Goldsborough). An Oration, delivered before the Citizens of Boston, on the Fifty Eighth Anniversary of American Independence. Boston, John H. Eastburn, City Printer, 1833. 20 pp.
    "It indeed well becomes us to gather yearly around the monuments of past times, and deepen and freshen the inscriptions traced there--to come up to the altar of the Most High God, and place upon it our tribute of gratitude for the care which carried our fathers through times in which human foresight and human strength might not have availed; but we have performed but half of our duty if we stop there; a great object in commemorating the past, is to incite the present and the future; and by rendering ourselves familiar with the circumstances under which the peculiar character of our people and of our institutions was formed, we give the surest pledge, that in our day the high dignity to which they have attained shall not be tarnished.
    ... "During this period a religious persecution was going on in England under King James, such as has rarely disgraced the history of any country. A small band of Puritans as they were termed, in the hope of enjoying freedom of conscience, had already removed from their homes to Holland; but not being satisfied with that place, they determined to come to America. Having obtained a grant of lands from the Virginia Company, they prepared themselves for the voyage, but it was not until after many hardships, and the loss of one of their vessels, that having at last placed every thing on board the May Flower, the little band of pilgrims, numbering in all, including their females and children, but one hundred and one, on the sixth day of September, 1620, sailed from their native land, which so many of them were destined never more to revisit."

  • Prescott, George Washington. An Oration delivered the Fourth of July, 1808 in the North Meeting-House in Portsmouth, N.H. [Portsmouth, N.H.], [1808]. 17 pp.

  • Prime, Nathaniel S. (Nathaniel Scudder). The year of jubilee, but not to Africans: a Discourse, delivered July 4th, 1825, being the 49th anniversary of American Independence. Salem, N.Y, 1825. 24 pp.

  • Pringle, John Julius. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on the fourth of July, 1800. In commemoration of American independence. By appointment of the American Revolution Society, and published at the request of that society, an also of the South-Carolina State Society of Cincinnati. [Three lines in Latin from Cicero] By John J. Pringle, a member of the Revolution Society, and attorney general of South-Carolina. Charleston [S.C.], M.DCCC. [1800].
    "Cultivate good morals as highly essential to free governments; and religion, without which morals can have no solid support. be ever mindful, that civil societies, especially those under republican government, cannot subsist without due obedience to the laws. Never confound licentiousness with liberty, and guard against anarchy, as much as against tyranny."

  • Puffer, Reuben. A Discourse, delivered at Berlin, July 4, 1810, on the anniversary of American Independence. Leominster, Mass., 1810. 15 pp.
    "LET me also name to you religion. This is one of the main pillars on which rest the order, peace, and stability of republics. As well might we hope that our bodies should continue healthful and vigorous after the animating spirit was fled, as expect that a people should remain free and happy without the aid of religion. Let atheistic and infidel principles be generally adopted and assume a practical character, and all that is lovely, desirable, or useful in a social state will speedily wither and die. Like the chilling blasts of winter, which spread desolation through the vegetable kingdoms, such to the morals and happiness of society will be the disbelief of religious truths. This good day cannot fail to remind us, how greatly we are indebted to the moral influence of divine institutions for the distinguishing blessings of our land."

  • Putnam, Aaron Hall. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1805, at the request of the Federal Republicans of the town of Charlestown, at the anniversary commemoration of ... Charlestown [Mass.], 1805. 18 pp.


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  • Quincy, Josiah, 1772-1864. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1798, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American ... Boston, 1798. 27 pp.

  • Quincy, Josiah, 1772-1864. An Oration, delivered on Tuesday, the fourth of July, 1826, it being the fiftieth anniversary of American Independence: before the Supreme ... Boston, 1826. 30 pp.

  • Quint, Alonzo Hall. One hundredth anniversary of the national Independence, July 4, 1876: its celebration by the city of Dover, N.H., the public proceedings, and ... Dover, N.H, 1876. 52 pp.


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  • Ramsay, David, 1749-1815. An oration on the advantages of American independence: spoken before a publick assembly of the inhabitants of Charlestown in South-Carolina, on the second anniversary of that glorious aera. / By David Ramsay, M.B.; [Five lines in Latin from Virgil] [6], 21, [1] pp.; 22 cm. 1800 edition.
  • Ramsay, David, 1749-1815. An Oration, delivered on the anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1794; in Saint Michael's Church, to the inhabitants of Charleston, South Carolina. London: printed and sold by Citizen Daniel Isaac Eaton, 1795. 23 pp.
    "Having delivered the first oration that was spoken in the United States, to celebrate this great event, I feel myself doubly honored in being again called upon, after a lapse of sixteen years, to perform the same duty."
    ... "I will not wound your ears, on this festive day, by a repetition of the many injuries received by this country from Great Britain, which forced us to cut the gordian knot which before had joined us together. Suffice it to observe, that for the twelve years preceding the 4th of July, 1776, claim rose on claim, injury followed injury, and oppression trod on the heels of oppression, till we had no alternative left, but that of abject slavery or complete independence. The spirit of freedom decided in favour of the latter: Heaven smiled on our exertions."
    ... "Among the privileges enjoyed by the citizens of these States, we may reckon AN EXEMPTION FROM ECCLESIASTICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. These promote hypocrisy, and uniformly have been engines of oppression. They have transmitted error from one generation to another, and restrained that free spirit of enquiry which leads to improvement. In this country no priests can decimate the fruits of our industry, nor is any preference, whatever, given to one sect above another."
    ... "Upon an average, five of our CITIZENS do not pay as much to the support of government as one European SUBJECT. the whole sum expended in administering the public affairs of the United States, is not equal to the fourth part of what is annually spent in supporting one crowned head in Europe."

  • Rantoul, Robert, 1805-1852. An Oration, delivered before the inhabitants of the town of South Reading and its vicinity, on the Fourth of July, 1832. Salem [Mass.], 1832. 35 pp.

  • Rantoul, Robert, 1805-1852. An Oration, delivered before the Gloucester Mechanic Association, on the Fourth of July, 1833. Salem [Mass.]: Printed by Foote & Chisholm,, 1833. 50 pp.

  • Rantoul, Robert, 1805-1852. An Oration delivered before the democrats and antimasons, of the county of Plymouth: at Scituate, on the Fourth of July, 1836. Boston, 1836. 57 pp.

  • Rantoul, Robert, 1805-1852. An Oration delivered before the democratic citizens of the County of Worcester...July 4, 1837. Worcester, 1837. 71 pp.

  • Reagan, Ronald, President, U.S. Message on the Observance of Independence Day, 1981. July 3, 1981.
    "Back in 1776, John Adams wrote his wife Abigail that the anniversary of our independence should be observed with great fanfare: '. . . with pomp and parades . . . shows and games . . . and sports and guns and bells . . . with bonfires and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, and from this time forevermore.'
    "Well, Mr. Adams, rest assured that what you wanted is being done. Your traditions are now ours, and we guard them like national treasures. And you know why. When we unfurl our flags, strike up the bands, and light up the skies each July 4th, we celebrate the most exciting, ongoing adventure in human freedom the world has ever known."

  • Reagan, Ronald, President, U.S. Radio Address to the Nation on the Observance of Independence Day. July 3, 1982.
    "The Scriptures tell us that 'Where the spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.' And for more than two centuries now our blessed land has grown and prospered, guided by a deep faith in the Almighty and an unquenchable thirst for freedom. As George Washington once wrote to another of the Founding Fathers, James Madison, 'Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.'
    ... "So, on this special day, the birthday of our nation, in the midst of all the joyous celebrations let us take a moment to remember the debt of thanks we owe to those who came before us, to the same God who guides us all, and to the spirit of faith and patriotism which still makes America 'the land of the free and the home of the brave.'
    "Thank you, God bless you, and God bless America."

  • Reagan, Ronald, President, U.S. Message on the Observance of Independence Day, 1985. July 3, 1985.
    "To this day, this eloquent document detailing the rights of man and the concept of individual liberty is as moving as it is timely. It continues to hold profound meaning for us. We should remember the words of John Adams when he wrote of its signing to his wife Abigail as, 'the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.'"
    "This Independence Day, 1985, let us be guided by the wisdom of that great American statesman and of all our Founding Fathers. As we commemorate 209 years of liberty today, let us pray for God's blessing and His help in safeguarding the precious legacy of the Declaration of Independence."

  • Reagan, Ronald, President, U.S.Message on the Observance of Independence Day, 1986. July 3, 1986.
    "Quite simply, it was the courage and the vision of our Founding Fathers. They seized the unique historical moment Providence had placed within their grasp. Determined to protect and guarantee fundamental human rights, they felt called upon to bring our nation into being.
    "In order to give that new nation shape and direction they drew freely on the riches of the Judeo-Christian tradition with its central affirmation that God, not chance, rules in the affairs of men, and that each of us has an inviolable dignity because we have been fashioned in the image and likeness of our Creator. The Founding Fathers established a nation under God, ruled not by arbitrary decrees of kings or the whims of entrenched elites but by the consent of the governed. Theirs was the vision of a striving, God-fearing, self-reliant people living in the sunlight of justice and breathing the bracing air of liberty."

  • Reagan, Ronald, President, U.S. Message on the Observance of Independence Day, 1987. June 29, 1987.
    "That conception of freedom is expressed with eloquence and wisdom in the Declaration of Independence and in the Constitution whose bicentennial we observe this year. The Declaration affirms our belief that government exists to secure our God-given rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The Constitution provides for a system of limited government which secures these blessings of liberty, ensuring that We the People remain truly in charge."

  • Reed, Caleb. Address delivered before the Boston Society of the New Jerusalem, July 4, 1837. Boston, 1837. 10 pp.
    "Both with individuals and societies, the external, literal law, filled indeed, and seen to be filled with the Divine spirit and life, while it is equally obligatory upon all, is at the same time the broad foundation on which all must stand. Here is the great original and pattern, from which alone every thing truly human is derived, and to which all must be ultimately referred."

  • Reed, Isaac Gardner, 1783-1847. An Oration delivered at Warren, on the fourth day of July, A.D. 1809, in commemoration of the declaration of American independence, at the request of the Library Society in Warren by Isaac G. Reed. 21 pp. 19 cm.

  • Reeve, Jeremiah, fl. early 19th century. Oration, delivered at Canterbury, on the Fourth of July, 1802 by Jeremiah Reeve. Windham [Conn.]: Printed by John Byrne, 1802. 10 pp.

  • Republican Young Men (Boston, Mass.) Boston, June 12, 1809. [blank] Sir, you are earnestly requested to attend a meeting of the Republican Young Men of this town, at Green Dragon Hall, this evening at 8 o'clock, for the purpose of making arrangements for celebrating the anniversary of our national independence. 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Republican Young Men (Boston, Mass.) Independence! Mr. [blank] Sir, In compliance with the recommendation of the committee of arrangements, a meeting of the Republican Young Men will be holden on Monday evening next, (June 24) at the Exchange Coffee House, at 8 o'clock, for the purpose of making the necessary arrangements for the celebration, by a public dinner, of the approaching anniversary of American independence ... 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Republicans. Republican celebration. Performances at the meeting house. 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Republicans of Salem. American independence. The thirth-sixth [sic] anniversary of American independence will be celebrated by the Republicans of Salem.--A procession will be formed, and An Oration delivered on the occasion. 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Richardson, Israel Putnam, fl. early 19th century. An Oration, pronounced at the meeting-house in Bennington on the Fourth of July, 1807, Israel Putnam Richardson. 24 pp.

  • Richardson, James, 1771-1858. An Oration on the principles of liberty and independence, pronounced July 4, 1808, at the request of a number of the inhabitants of the town of Dedham and its vicinity, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by James Richardson. 16 pp.
    Let us then, trusting under God in our Spirit and resources, defend our independence and our rights against every assailant, and knowing that it is better to die with glory, than to live in disgrace; determine rather to fall in defence of our liberties, than to witness the subjugation of our beloved country!

  • Richardson, John G. Obedience to human law considered in the light of divine truth: a Discourse delivered in the First Baptist meeting house, Lawrence, Mass. July 4, ... Lawrence, 1852. 18 pp.

  • Richardson, J. S. (John Smythe), 1777-1850. An Oration delivered in St. Michael's Church before the inhabitants of Charleston, South Carolina, on Monday the fifth of July 1813, the fourth being Sunday, in commemoration of American independence by J.S. Richardson. 34 pp.

  • Richardson, Joseph, 1778-1871. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1812, before the citizens of the county of Plymouth on the anniversary of American independence. 23 pp. 21 cm.

  • Richardson, Joseph, 1778-1871. An Oration, delivered in the South Parish, in Weymouth, July 4, 1828: being the fifty-second anniversary of American Independence. Hingham [Mass.], 1828. 23 pp.

  • Richardson, Luther, 1774-1811. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1800: at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Roxbury, in commemoration of American Independence. Boston, [1800]. 17 pp.
    "Assembled before the altar of our independence, we all swear to defend those rights purchased by your toils; to obey the last precepts of our great political father; and to unite with zeal in the cause of God and our country."

  • Richardson, William, 1774-1838. An Oration pronounced at Groton, July 4, 1801, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, by William Merchant Richardson. Amherst, N.H.: From the press of Samuel Preston, 1801. 16 pp.

  • Ringwood, Thomas, fl. early 19th century. An Address, delivered before the Franklin Typographical Association of New-York, and a select company; on the fifth of July, 1802: in commemoration of the twenty-seventh anniversary of American independence, and of the third of the Association. By Thomas Ringwood. Published by request of the Association. 22, [2] pp. 23 cm.

  • Ripley, Eleazer Wheelock, 1782-1839. An Oration pronounced at Hallowell on the Fourth of July, 1805, in commemoration of American Independence by E.W. Ripley. 12 pp.

  • Ritchie, Andrew, 1782-1862. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1808 at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by Andrew Ritchie. 2nd ed. 19 pp. 21 cm.

  • Ritner, Joseph. An Address delivered before the Corps of Cadets of the United States Military Academy, at West-Point, on the fifty-third anniversary of American ... Newburgh, 1829. 13 pp.

  • Robbins, Asher. Oration, delivered on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1827, at Newport, R.I. Providence, 1827. 27 pp.

  • Robertson, George. Address on behalf of the Deinologian Society of Centre College: delivered at Danville, Kentucky, on the 4th of July, 1834. Lexington, Ky, 1834. 24 pp.

  • Robinson, Frederick. An Oration delivered before the Trades Union of Boston and Vicinity...on the fifty-eighth anniversary of American Independence. . Boston, 1834. 33 pp.

  • Rockwell, Samuel. An Oration, delivered at the celebration of American independence, at Salisbury, Fourth July, ninety-seven. By Dr. Samuel Rockwell. Published at the request of the committee. Litchfield [Conn.], [1797].

  • Rocky Mountain News, (Denver, CO). Churches Commemorate the Nation's Natal Day Monday, July 05, 1897; pg. 8; Issue 186; col A.

  • Rodman, John. An Oration, delivered before the Tammany society, or Columbian order, Tailor's, Hibernian provident, Columbian, Cordwainers, and George Clinton. New York, John Low, 1813. 26 pp.

  • Rogers, John, ca. 1740-1814. An Oration, pronounced at Campton, New Hampshire, on the Fourth of July, 1803, by John Rogers. 20 pp. ? cm.

  • Rogers, John. An Address delivered at the meeting house in Plymouth, New Hampshire, to the Washington Benevolent Society of that and the adjacent towns, on the ... Concord [N.H.], 1812. 14 pp.

  • Rogers, William. An Oration, in commemoration of the independence of the United States of North-America delivered July 4, 1787, at the Reformed Calvinist Church in Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Printed and sold by Prichard and Hall, in Market Street, between Front and Second Streets, 1787. 24 pp. Responsibility: by James Campbell, Esquire; To which is prefixed, an introductory prayer, delivered on the same occasion, by the Rev. William Rogers, A.M.; Published at the request of the Pennsylvania Society of the Cincinnati.
    "As this is a period, O Lord, big with events impenetrable by any human scrutiny, we fervently recommend to thy fatherly notice that august body, assembled in this city, who compose our federal convention. Will it please thee, O thou Eternal I Am! to favor them, from day to day, with thy inspiring presence; be their wisdom and strength; enable them to devise such measures as may prove happy instruments in healing all divisions and prove the good of the great whole; incline the hearts of all the people to receive with pleasure, combined with a determination to carry into execution, whatever these thy servants may wisely recommend; that the United States of America may form one example of a free and virtuous government, which shall be the result of human mutual deliberation, and which shall not, like other governments, whether ancient or modern, spring out of mere chance or be established by force. May we trust in the cheering prospect of being a country delivered from anarchy, and continue, under the influence of republican virtue, to partake of all the blessings of cultivated and Christian society."

  • Rogers, William. An Oration, delivered July 4, 1789, at the Presbyterian church, in Arch Street, Philadelphia. Philadelphia, 1789. 31 pp.

  • Romaine, Samuel B. An Oration, delivered before the Tammany Society, or Columbian Order, Tailor's, Hibernian Provident, Shipwright's, Columbian, Manhattan, and Cordwainer's Societies in the city of New-York, on the fourth day of July, 1812 by Samuel B. Romaine published by request of the general committee of arrangements. 16 pp. 20 cm.

  • Ruggles, Benjamin, 1783-1857. An Oration delivered at the new meeting house in Marietta ... on the Fourth of July, 1809, by Benjamin Ruggles. 16 pp.

  • Rush, Richard. An Oration: delivered in the hall of the House of Representatives, at the Capital, Washington, July 4, 1812. [Washington, D.C.], 1812. 47 pp.

  • Russell, Charles Theodore. An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the City of Boston, July 4, 1851. Boston, 1851. 31 pp.

  • Russell, Jonathan, 1771-1832. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1800, in the Baptist Meeting-House, in Providence: it being the anniversary of American Independence. [Warren, R.I.] : Rhode-Island, Providence; Warren, 1800. 37 pp.

  • Russell, Jonathan. An Oration, pronounced in the Baptist meeting-house, in Providence, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1800, by Jonathan Russell. 3rd edition. 27 pp. 22 cm.

  • Russell, Jonathan, 1771-1832. An Oration, pronounced in the Baptist meeting house in Providence on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1800, by Jonathan Russell. 28 pp.

  • Russell, Jonathan, 1771-1832. An Oration, pronounced in the Baptist meeting-house in Providence, it being the anniversary of American independence, by Jonathan Russell. 14th ed. 26 pp.

  • Russell, Thomas. Oration delivered before the city authorities of Boston: on the Fourth of July, 1864. Boston, 1864. 35 pp.

  • Ruter, Martin, 1785-1838. An Oration delivered at Canterbury, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1810, by Martin Ruter. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Rutledge, Edward. An Address, delivered before the inhabitants of Stratford, July 4, 1827. New-Haven; (New-Haven), 1827. 15 pp.

  • Rutledge, Henry M. (Henry Middleton), 1775-1844. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's Church ... Fourth of July, 1804, in commemoration of American Independence, by Henry M. Rutledge. 21 pp.


    S
  • Salem Gazette. Salem, Massachusetts. July 7, 1826. Coverage of the 50th anniversary of American Independence.

  • Salem Gazette. Salem, Massachusetts. July 18, 1826. Coverage of the 50th anniversary of American Independence.

  • Sampson, J. P. C., fl. early 19th century. An Oration delivered before the members of the law institution at Litchfield, on the Fourth of July, 1818. New-York, 1818. 14 pp.
    Forty years of freedom, happiness and prosperity; these are the blessings which this day has given us to celebrate. Had it never shone; we should never have known freedom or tasted prosperity. Who then dare withhold his joy from this occasion, and afterwards call himself an American? A celebration, my fellow citizens! the day should have an eternal triumph through which all our days arc glorious. Your first thought at your awaking, on this day, should be one that would rise to heaven to thank it for the virtues of your fathers, and at your lying down, you should still think with gratitude of those who bad rendered all your days prosperous, and all your nights secure. If you doubt it, take your children with you to their graves, and ask your hearts the question there. If you remain still unconvinced, compare the condition of other nations with your own, and determine for yourselves the difference between slavery and freedom.

  • Sampson, Zabdiel, 1781-1828. American independence, An Oration pronounced at New-Bedford, July 4, 1806 by Zabdiel Sampson. 15 pp.
    "In pleasing ecstacy we with a just pride exclaim, Happy, thrice happy is America, whose God is the Lord. to be an honest citizen of our country is more joy, more true honour, than to wear crowns of kinds, or sit in splendid palaces of tyranny."

  • Sampson, Zabdiel. Republican celebration of American Independence: an Oration pronounced in the new meeting house at Plymouth, July 4, 1808. Boston, 1808. 14 pp.
    Need I, on this festive day, call to your mind the worst of traitors, the blackest of satan's empire, the tories of our revolution? See them cutting asunder the dearest ties of nature, and brandishing their swords already moist with the blood of their brethren. You, my aged fathers, were spectators of their cruelty. You have not forgotten the savage deeds of Hutchinson and his party. You recollect the horn-book gentry, who mingled among the sons of freedom with the religion of God in their mouths and the malice of Satan in their hearts. You see them meditating the slavery and death of millions, while you were making efforts for liberty. You see them mounting that the proscribed Adams and Hancock were not victims of their sanguinary vengeance. A mercenary hand of outcasts, from the filthy dungeons of Britain, join this miscreant host. In union they trample on the rights of man and exult in the ruins of innocence. They commit every crime that traits the character of a brutal ministry.
    History relates the tragical scenes of those trying times. It tells us of every successive struggle between slavery and freedom. Registered in history, the cruelties of Gage, Howe, Pigot, Arnold, Burgoyne, and Cornwallis will be remembered with irreconcileable hatred; while the achievements of American worthies will swell the lists of patriotism and virtue to the latest period.
    The cause Americans vindicated, in the revolution, did not embrace the rights of a tyrant or despot. It embraced the rights of their country and their God. Not the spirit of slavery, but the spirit of freedom led them on to brave the dangers of the day.

  • Sanders, Daniel Clarke, 1768-1850. An Address, delivered in Medfield, 4th July, 1816. Dedham [Mass.], 1816. 19 pp.
    "The ancient Greeks and Romans, in certain periods of their Republicks, entertained retined and exalted sentiments respecting free governments. But licentiousness, rather than liberty, was the practical effect. They vibrated from one extreme to another. Their assemblies were inclined to riots, rather than to just restraints. They began with an absurdity, that a whole empire could meet to legislate, to judge and to execute tbe laws. If they ever thought of It representative government, they never had virtue enough to adopt it. This principle is worthy of a patient experiment. It is possible it may be extended to a territory however large and to citizens however numerous. The framers of our constitution adopted other principles, valuable as they were new. The powers of sovereignty were divided into departments, these were to serve as checks upon abuses of power, rendered unanimity in villainy necessary to the assumption of unlawful authority, while it was intended to make justice superiour to dependance on rulers themselves, and gave security against powerful oppressors in trials by jury.

    ..."When tempted to 'speak evil of dignities and of the powers that be which are ordained of God,' pause long enough to reflect that our government will be perfect, when our citizens shall be so."

  • Savage, James, 1784-1873. An Oration delivered July 4, 1811, at the request of the selectmen of Boston, in commemoration of American Independence. Boston, 1811. 21 pp.

  • Sears, Freeman, 1779-1811. An Oration on the nature and perpetuity of American independence, pronounced at Natick, July 4, A.D. 1809, before the Fifth Regiment of the First Brigade, and Third Division of the militia by Freeman Sears. 18 pp. 21 cm.

  • Sedgwick, Robert, 1787-1841. An Oration delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society, at Washington Hall, in the city of New-York, on the fourth of July, 1811. New York, 1811. 15 pp.

  • Seeger, C. L. (Charles Lewis), 1763-1848. An Oration pronounced at Northampton, July 4, 1810, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by C.L. Seeger. 2nd ed. 19 pp. 22 cm.

  • Sewall, Jonathan Mitchell, 1748-1808. An Oration, delivered at Portsmouth, New-Hampshire, on the Fourth of July, 1788 : being the anniversary of American Independence. . Portsmouth [N.H.], 1788. 20 pp.

  • Seymour, John F., fl. 19th century. Centennial Address delivered at Trenton, N.Y., July 4, 1876. Utica, N.Y, 1877. 146 pp.

  • Shannon, Isaac N., 1821-1858. Divine providence in American history and politics: a Discourse delivered in the Second Presbyterian Church, New-Brunswick, N.J., July 4, 1852. New-Brunswick, 1852. 24 pp.

  • Shaw, Lemuel, 1781-1861. An Oration delivered at Boston, July 4, 1815, before the supreme executive of the commonwealth, and the municipal authority and citizens of the town, in commemoration of American independence by Lemuel Shaw. 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Sheffield, William P., fl. 19th century. Historical Address, of the city of Newport, delivered July 4th, 1876: with an appendix. Newport, 1876. 79 pp. Also here.
    The Puritans and the Cavaliers, the Independents and the Episcopalians, agreed that God was to be worshiped; they differed only as to the form of worship, and this difference was the primary cause of the settling of the New England colonies by British subjects. True the spirit of adventure, and the advantages of trade, contributed to this end, but the controlling influence operating upon most of the Puritan emigrants, was the desire to worship God in accordance with their convictions of duty.
    ... To-day our nation begins a new era in its history, with ampler means at its control to surpass in the future all of the achievements of the past, for we have vast fields of our country yet unsubdued and uncultivated. The commerce of the world is open to our enterprises, and we are at full liberty to gather the harvest from our industry in every land; free education is within the reach of all, and there is a pulpit in every neighborhood from which all are instructed in their duties to man and to God.
    True, there are immoralities and corruptions practiced over the land. But so it has been since our first parents parted in sorrow from the Eden of their rest; virtue has since then been warring with vice, and men have been gathering and consuming that for which they have not toiled. But in no age of the world has the popular conscience been quicker to detect or resent crime or wrong than in that age in which a benevolent Providence has cast our fortunes.

  • Shepherd, Charles, 1780-1821. An Oration delivered at Greenfield, July 4, 1809, the thirty fourth anniversary of American independence, by Charles Shepherd. 20 pp.

  • Shepard, Isaac F. (Isaac Fitzgerald), 1816-1889. Liberty and its mission: an Oration delivered before the citizens of West Killingley, Conn., July 4, 1856. Boston, 1856. 24 pp.

  • Sheys, James B., fl. 19th century. An Oration delivered at Paterson, New-Jersey, on the fourth of July, 1825. Newark, 1826. 17 pp.

  • Shipherd, Zebulon R. (Zebulon Rudd), d. 1841. An Oration delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society at Poultney, on the 4th of July, 1814 by Zebulon R. Shipherd, Esq. With An Address, upon the reading of the Declaration of independence by Chauncey Langdon,. 27 pp. 22 cm.

  • Silliman, Benjamin. An Oration delivered at Hartford on the 6th of July, A.D. 1802 : before the Society of the Cincinnati for the state of Connecticut, assembled to celebrate the anniversary of American independence. Hartford [Conn.]: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, 1802. 34 pp.

  • Simkins, Eldred, 1779-1831. An Oration in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, delivered at Edgefield Court-house on the Fourth of July, 1807 by Eldred Simkins. 32 pp.

  • Simpkins, John, 1768-1843. An Oration in commemoration of American independence delivered at Brewster, July 4, 1811, at the request of the inhabitants, by John Simpkins. 19 pp.

  • Simons, Keating Lewis, 1775-1819. An Oration, delivered in the Independent circular church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on Friday, the Fourth of July, 1806, in commemoration of American independence ... by Keating Lewis Simons. Charleston [S.C.]: Printed by W.P. Young, [1806]. 24 pp. 19 cm.

  • Skinner, A. N. (Aaron Nichols), 1845-1918. An Oration delivered at the Whig celebration, New Haven, July 4, 1834. New Haven, 1834. 23 pp.

  • Slack, John H. (John Hancock), 1789-1857. An Oration pronounced before the associated disciples of Washington, members of the Hopkinton, Concord, and Dunbarton societies, at Hopkinton, New-Hampshire, July 5, 1813, being the thirty-seventh anniversary of American independence by John H. Slack. 19 pp.

  • Slade, William, 1786-1859. An Oration pronounced at Middlebury (Vt.) on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1814, by William Slade, Jun., Esq. 40 pp. 24 cm.

  • Slemons, Thomas, fl. early 19th century. An Oration pronounced at Mr. Thaddeus Broad's, on the fourth day of July, 1810, before the Republicans of Falmouth, by Thomas Slemons. Portland [Me.]: Printed by Francis Douglas, 1810. 16 pp. 18 cm.

  • Smith, Edward Darrell, 1778-1819. An Oration delivered on the fourth day of July, 1812, to the citizens of Pendleton district, and published at their request by Edward Darrell Smith. 22 pp. 22 cm.

  • Smith, Elias, 1769-1846. The loving kindness of God displayed in the triumph of republicanism in America: being a Discourse delivered at Taunton (Mass.), July fourth. [Massachusetts?], 1809. 23 pp.

  • Smith, Elias, 1769-1846. A Discourse on government and religion, delivered at Gray, Maine, July fourth, 1810, at the celebration of American independence by Elias Smith. 54 pp. 16 cm.

  • Smith, Isaac William, 1825-1898. Address delivered July 4th, 1849 at the centennial celebration of the incorpOration of the town of Hampstead, N.H. Manchester, N.H, 1849. 82 pp.

  • Smith, Isaac William, 1825-1898. History of the town of Hampstead, N.H., for one hundred years. Haverhill, Mass., 1884. 45 pp.

  • Smith, James H., fl. 19th century. An Oration delivered by appointment before the Union & State Rights Party, on the 4th of July, at the Second Presbyterian Church. Charleston, 1832. 26 pp.

  • Smith, Jerome Van Crowinshield, 1800-1879. An Oration, delivered before the inhabitants of South Boston, on Saturday, July 4, 1835, the fifty-ninth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1835. 56 pp.

  • Smith, Junius, 1780-1853 An Oration, pronounced at Hartford before the Society of the Cincinnati for the State of Cincinnati: convened to celebrate the anniversary of American Independence, July 4th, 1804 / by Junius Smith. Hartford [Conn.]Printed by Hudson & Goodwin, 1804. 27 pp.

  • Smith, N. Ruggles (Nathaniel Ruggles), 1782-1859. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1808, before the citizens of the town of Roxbury, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by N. Ruggles Smith. 19 pp.

  • Smith, Robert Dickson, 1838-1888. Oration delivered before the City Council and Citizens of Boston: on the one hundred and fourth anniversary of the Declaration of American Independence, July 5, 1880. Boston, 1880. 53 pp. Also here.
    In Board of Aldermen, July 6, 1880.
    Ordered, That the thanks of the City Council be tendered to Robert Dickson Smith, Esq., for the very appropriate and eloquent Oration upon the life and services of Samuel Adams, which was delivered before the municipal authorities of this city, July 5, 1880, upon the occasion of the dedication of the statue of that Revolutionary Patriot in this city ; and that a copy of said oration be requested for publication.

  • Smith, Rogers, 1776-1845. An Oration delivered at Mount Vernon, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1808, being the thirty-second anniversary of American independence by Rogers Smith. 20 pp.

  • Smith, Samuel Harrison, 1772-1845. Oration pronounced by Samuel H. Smith, Esquire, in the city of Washington, on Monday, the fifth of July, 1813. Washington City [i.e., Washington, D.C.], 1813. 23 pp.

  • Smith, Stephen C., fl. early 19th century. An Oration delivered at the request of the Committee of Associated Mechanics, at the new meeting house in Marietta ... on the Fourth of July, 1808 by Stephen C. Smith. 16 pp.

  • Smith, Thomas Laurens, 1797-1882. A Historical Address, delivered on the fourth of July, 1839: at the centennial anniversary of the settlement of Windham. Portland [Me.], 1840. 32 pp.

  • Smith, Thomas Rhett, fl. early 19th century. An Oration, delivered in St. Michael's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on Monday, the fifth of July, 1802 in commemoration of American independence by appointment of the American Revolution Society and published at the request of that Society, and also of the South-Carolina State Society of Cincinnati by Thomas Rhett Smith. 20 pp. 19 cm.

  • Smith, William Loughton, 1758-1812. An Oration, delivered in St. Philip's Church, before the inhabitants of Charleston, South-Carolina, on the Fourth of July, 1796, in commemoration of American independence. By appointment of the American Revolution Society, and published at the request of that society, and also of the South-Carolina State Society of Cincinnati. [Charleston, S.C.], [1796]. 42 pp.

  • Smucker, Isaac, 1807-1894. An Account of the celebration of American Independence at Clay Lick by the Licking County Pioneers: together with an Address on early times in ... Newark, Ohio, 1869. 37 pp.

  • Smucker, Isaac, 1807-1894. Centennial history of Licking County, Ohio: read at the centennial celebration of the Licking Co. Agricultural Society, at the "Old Fort," July ... Newark, Ohio, 1876. 82 pp.

  • Snell, Thomas, 1774-1862. An Oration: pronounced at Brookfield, July 5, 1813, at the celebration of the Independence of the United States of America. Brookfield [Mass.], 1813. 29 pp.
    "This anniversary presents to our minds a group of interesting subjects for contemplation. Our national independence, with its attendant privileges, furnishes a theme of praise to that kind Providence, which shielded us in the day of battle and gave us a distinguished triumph over our foes."

  • Snowden, Edgar, 1810-1875. An Address delivered before the Enosinian Society of the Columbian College, D.C., July 4, 1837. Washington [D.C.], 1837. 21 pp.

  • Song. Song, for the anniversary of American independence, 1819. Tune--"Ye mariners of England." 1 sheet ([1] p.) 24 x 20 cm.

  • Southard, Samuel L. (Samuel Lewis), 1787-1842. An Oration delivered at Flemington, Hunterdon County, state of New-Jersey, on the Fourth of July, 1811, by Samuel L. Southard. 21 pp. 23 cm.

  • Southard, Samuel L. (Samuel Lewis), 1787-1842. Address delivered before the Newark Mechanics' Association, July 5, 1830. Newark [N.J.], 1830. 25 pp.

  • Southwick, Solomon, 1773-1839. An Oration: delivered, by appointment, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1828, in presence of the Convention of Seceding Free Masons, and a vast ... Albany, 1828. 84 pp.

  • Southwick, Solomon, 1773-1839. An Oration: delivered by invitation before the Albany County Temperance Society, at the Reformed Dutch Church in Bethlehem, July 4th, 1838. Albany [N.Y.], 1838. 44 pp.

  • Southwick, Solomon, 1773-1839. An Oration: delivered by appointment of the committees of the corporation, and the several civic and military societies, of the city of Albany, at the Methodist Episcopal church in North Pearl street: in commemoration of American independence: July fourth, 1839. Albany, Printed by A. Southwick, 1839. 34 pp.

  • Spooner, William Jones, 1794-1824. Review of the Address delivered by Hon. John Q. Adams, at Washington, on 4th of July, 1821. Boston, 1821. 26 pp.

  • Sprague, Charles, 1791-1875. An Oration, delivered on Monday, Fourth of July, 1825, in commemoration of American Independence: before the Supreme Executive of the Commonwealth, and the City Council and Inhabitants of the City of Boston. Boston, 1825. 30 pp. Also here.
    "The achievement of American Independence was not merely the separation of a few obscure colonies from their parent realm; it was the practical annunciation to created man, that he was created free! and it will stand in history, the epoch from which to compute the real duration of political liberty. Intolerance and tyranny had for ages leagued to keep their victim down. While the former could remain the pious guardian of his conscience, the latter knew it had nothing to fear from his courage. He was theirs, soul and body. His intellectual energies were paralyzed, that he might not behold the corruptions of the church; and his physical powers were fettered, that he could not rise up against the abuses of the state. Thus centuries of darkness rolled away. Light broke, from time to time, but it only served to show the surrounding clouds; bright stars, here and there, looked out, but they were the stars of a gloomy night. At length, the morning dawned, when one generation of your ancestors willed that none but their Maker should guide them in their duty as Christians; and the perfect day shone forth, when another declared that from none but their Maker would they derive their immunities as men. The world had seen the former secure a privilege, whose original denial would have left their faith asleep in its founder's sepulchre; and they now beheld the latter in the enjoyment of rights, without which, their freedom would have been palsied at the footstool of a monarch's throne."

  • Sprague, Charles, 1791-1875. Oration of Charles Sprague, Esq.: delivered at Boston, Massachusetts on July 4th, 1825. Cincinnati [Ohio], 1826. 18 pp.

  • Sprague, Charles, 1791-1875. An Oration: pronounced before the inhabitants of Boston, July the Fourth, 1825, in commemoration of American Independence. 6th ed. Boston, 1831. 29 pp.

  • Sprague, Joseph E., 1782-1852. An Oration delivered at Salem, on the fourth of July, 1810. [Salem, Mass.], 1810. 24 pp.

  • Sprague, Joseph E., 1782-1852. An Oration, delivered in Salem, on the fifth of July, 1813: in commemoration of is, and national Independence. Salem [Mass.], 1813. 17 pp.

  • Sprague, Joseph E., 1782-1852. An Address delivered before the Salem Charitable Mechanic Association: on their fourth anniversary, July 4, 1821, in the North Meeting House ... N.p., 1821. 21 pp.

  • Sprague, Peleg, 1793-1880. An Oration pronounced at Worcester, July 4, 1815, the thirty-ninth anniversary of American independence by Peleg Sprague. 20 pp. 19 cm.

  • Stacy, Nathaniel, 1778 or 1779-1868. A Discourse delivered at Hamilton Centre, July 4, 1828. Hamilton [N.Y.], 1828. 21 pp.

  • Staples, Nahor Augustus, 1830-1864. A Sermon for the Fourth of July, 1862: on the chastisement of war. New-York, 1862. 15 pp.

  • Starr, Gideon, 1781?-1801. An Oration, delivered in the Dutch church, in the city of Schenectady, on the Fourth of July, 1801.: before a crowded audience / by Gideon Starr. Albany [N.Y.]: Printed by C.R. and G. Webster, [1801] 14 pp.; 21 cm.

  • Stebbins, Rufus P. (Rufus Phineas), 1810-1885. An Address delivered before the Peace Society of Amherst College, July 4, 1838. Amherst [Mass.], 1838. 29 pp.

  • Stebbins, Horatio, 1821-1902. Oration delivered by Horatio Stebbins at San Francisco, Cal., July 4, 1876. [San Francisco, Calif.?], [1876?]. 13 pp.

  • Steere, Thomas, fl. 19th century. Address at the citizens' celebration: Woonsocket, July 4, 1848. Woonsocket [R.I.], 1848. 15 pp.

  • Sterry, Consider, 1761-1817. An Address to the Republican citizens, delivered at Norwich (Con.) on the 4th July 1806 ... by Consider Sterry. 16 pp.

  • Steward, Henry, 1730-1806. Equality, the first principle of government in the United States, traced to its source, and some of its consequences delineated in a Discourse delivered at Owego Village ... July, 1804 by Henry Steward. Owego, N.Y.: Printed and sold by Stephen Mack, 32 pp.

    "The first object that claims our particular attention, is the principle of EQUALITY contained in the declaration of Independence. It says, 'We hold this truth to be self evident THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL'--The same act that announced the existence of our Republic, proclaimed also the principle on which it is erected a principle essential to every rule of Justice, but never before made the basis of any government.
    "In vain do we look for this principle in the structure of ancient Republics, where the citizens were divided into classes with unequal privileges--where the PRIESTHOOD, ---nised without any control--or where the peace and rights of all other Nations were continually violated; and in vain do we look for it in Monarchies or Aristocracies whose constituent principles are precisely the reverse of Equality, of Nature and of Justice. Though indeed the Equality of all Men in respect to their social rights, is self evident to the unbiased judgment of the man of nature; it is not so to him whose understanding has been from infancy misled by art, and habituated in error. To infuse wrong sentiments has been the constant tendency and design of the former system. Teach a man from childhood that he is BORN to obey and labor for another, without receiving an equivalent ... and he is then fitted for every imposition and every degradation of which human nature is capable: the idea of justice is banished; and the fear of present or future punishment alone prevents his commission of crimes, Whereas the principle of EQUAL RIGHTS to the unprejudiced mind, is evident as the light of day; and it naturaly suggests the idea,and prompts to the practice of Equal Justice. The stronger and more universal the sense of this EQUALITY is impressed on the minds of any people--the more will social intercourse conform to equity--the rights of individuals will be respected--and the necessity of coercive government will proportionably diminish.
    "The old system of government built on principles of injustice--corrupting mankind by its own example, ORGINATED and continues the crimes it pretends to correct; and is itself the greatest of all crimes ever committed against God or Man.
    "As Equality of Rights is the order of Nature, confirmed by the decision of Reason; so, it is recognised as the ROOT of ALL MORALITY, and the ESSENCE of that Religion we profess to believe. Hear what the AUTHOR of Christianity answered to the interogating Lawyer. "Thou shalt LOVE the Lord thy God with all thy Heat, Soul, and Mind: this is the first and great command; and the second is like unto it--THOU SHALT LOVE THY NEIGHBOUR AS THYSELF. On thse two hang all the law and the prophets." The love of our fellow men without distinction of rank; or exception of privilege EQUALY with ourselves, is here enjoined as a duty of the next importance to the love of our Creator.
    "AGAIN, the same divine ILLUMINATOR directed all human intercouse to be regulated by this unerring Rule--'Whatsover ye would that others should do unto you, do ye even so unto them.' The universal practice of this precept, would annihilate the old system of Inequality, Vassalage, Slavery and Subjection of Man to Man.
    "PERFECTLY correspondent to this, he gave his followers another Republican precept. 'Ye know that the PRINCES of the gentiles exercise dominion over them; and they that are GREAT exercise authority upon them: BUT IT SHALL NOT BE SO AMONG YOU; but whosoever will be great among you let him be your minister, and whosover will be chief let him be your servant.'
    "Services rendered was to be the only rule of distinction.
    "HERE then is seen the source from whence was derived the ELEMENTS of our system of Republic government ... from the order of nature--from the dictates of reason--and from the express precepts of holy writ! they are surely of divine origin ... eternal as truth ... perfect as light ... and permanent as the principles of justice.
    "The adoption of this principle of EQUALITY as the foundation and chief corner Stone of the new republic, is what distinguishes the American Revolution, and dignifies it above all revolutions of the world; and the DAY when this was declared as the will of the nation, has consequently become the most important ERA in the history of Man. It is this we admire--this we venerate. It has already received the honorable execration of Tyrants, the plaudits of MAN, and the approbating smiles of Heaven; and it will descend to a grateful posterity through every future age with increasing evidence of is [sic] divine excellence."

  • Stillman, Samuel, 1738-1807. An Oration: delivered July 4th, 1789, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in celebration of the anniversary of American independence. Boston: Printed by B. Edes & Son, no. 7. State-Street, 1789. 28 pp.

  • Stockton, Lucius Horatio. An Address delivered before the convention of the Friends of Peace of the state of New-Jersey, July 4, 1814. . [Trenton, N.J.?], [1814?]. 30 pp.

  • Stoddard, Amos. An Oration, delivered before the citizens of Portland, and the Supreme Judicial Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, on the fourth day of ... Portland [Me.], 1799. 29 pp.

  • Stone, A. L. (Andrew Leete). Oration delivered before the Sons of Temperance: at Charlestown, N.H., July 4, 1850. Boston, 1850. 23 pp.

  • Stone, A. L. (Andrew Leete). An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston: at the celebration of the seventy-eighth anniversary of American ... . Boston, 1854. 41 pp.

  • Stone, William Leete. Uncas and Miantonomoh: a Historical Discourse, delivered at Norwich, (Conn.), on the fourth day of July, 1842, on the occasion of the erection .... New York; (New York), 1842. 206 pp.

  • Storrs, Henry Randolph. Substance of Mr. Storrs' remarks, at the meeting of the friends of the administration: held at Whitesboro', July Fourth, 1828, for the purpose ... . Utica [N.Y.], 1828. 22 pp.

  • Story, Isaac. Liberty: a poem, delivered on the Fourth of July. Newburyport [Mass.], 1795. 8 pp.

  • Story, Isaac. An Oration on the anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America: pronounced at Worcester, July 4, 1801. Worcester, Mass, 1801. 31 pp.
    "We have been accustomed, on this joyous festival--on this birthday of Freedom and Empire--to awaken gratitude toDeity, and warm our national devotion, by retracing some of these great and perilous scenes, through which the divine hand conducted infant America, to her splendid rank among the nations of the earth."
    ... "Without morality, and a conscious belief in the doctrine of future rewards and punishment, the iron arm of tyranny cannot check the depravity of passion--preserve the rights of individuals, or the laws of neutrality. Seeing such is the savage temperature of atheism--such the harmonizing power of religion; let it be the first pursuit of our minds, the dearest object of our lives, to cultivate the pure principles of christianity; to act up to those immutable commands, which were instituted for our felicity in this world, and our eternal happiness in that which lies beyond the grave. A good christian was never an enemy to his country, a partizan in politics, or a friend to disorder."

  • Story, Joseph. An Oration pronounced at Salem on the fourth day of July, 1804: in commemoration of our national Independence. Salem [Mass.], 1804. 34 pp.
    "Our ancestors were truly the sones of enterprize. having fled from the tyranny of religious intolerance,, they fought in the uncultured wilds of America an asylum from oppression, and a heritage for their children. Nursed in an adversity the most trying, at a time when the rights of conscience wre established by inquisitorial edicts; when religious apostacy was decided by trials more absurd than Gothic ordeals; when heretical convictions were enforced at the stake and the scaffold, with cruelties which might appal the ehart of a Caligula, and arrest the purpose of a Suwarrow ... nursed in such an adversity, they knew the full value of liberty, and liberally paid for the purchase. They esteemed conscience more than life; and unfettered poverty more than luxurious dependence. ... The land which they explored was indeed no Canaan flowing with milk and honey, to sweeten the repose of wearied pilgrimage. The yell of the savage swept frightful on the blasts of night; and the day star sickened at the desolation of the pestilence. Whom the tomahawk saved from its fury, the famine smote with disease; whom the merciless winter spared from destruction, sunk under the hectic of summer. But a courage, which like the principles which inspired it, knew no rule but heaven, added perseverance to zeal, and success to perseverance. The intrepid exiles gloried in their toils and secured the transporting triumph of liberty. The established rights, not on the presceiption of antient usage; they established authorities, not merely on the chartered bounty of royal munificence; they established a nation, not by the gradual usurpation of aspriing vassals on feudal feignories ... but they established the whole on the legitimate basis of popular consent."

  • Stow, Baron. Oration, delivered at the Columbian College, in the District of Columbia, July 4, 1825. Washington City, 1825. 18 pp.

  • Streeter, Sebastian, 1783-1867. An Oration pronounced at Hampstead, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1814, by Sebastian Streeter. 12 pp.

  • Streeter, Squire. An Oration delivered on Mount Independence in Goffstown, New-Hampshire, on the thirty-sixth anniversary of American independence, July Fourth, 1812 by Squire Streeter. 16 pp.

  • Strong, Jonathan, 1764-1814. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1810, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Randolph, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, by Jonathan Strong. 25 pp. 24 cm.

  • Sullivan, George. An Oration, pronounced at Exeter on the fourth day of July 1800: in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Exeter, N.H, 1800. 16 pp.

  • Sullivan, George. An Oration, pronounced on the Fourth July [sic], 1816, before the inhabitants of the town of Boston: at the request of the selectmen. [Boston], 1816. 24 pp.

  • Sullivan, William, 1774-1839. An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1803, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence by William Sullivan. 2nd ed. 21 pp. ? cm.

  • Sumner, Bradford. An Oration delivered Friday, July 4, 1828, in commemoration of American Independence, before the supreme executive of the Commonwealth, and the ... . Boston, 1828. 28 pp.

  • Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874. The True grandeur of nations: an Oration delivered before the authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1845. Boston, 1845. 108 pp. Also here.

  • Sumner, George. An Oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1859: together with the speeches at the dinner in Faneuil Hall, and Other Ceremonies at the Celebration of the Eighty-Third Anniversary Of American Independence. Boston, 1859. 116 pp. Also here.
    "In the spirit in which John Adams prophesied that this day would be remembered, the people of Boston have ever held it in honor. 'With solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty, with pomp and parade, with guns and bells, and bonfires and illuminations,' they have through these many years, without a single exception, testified by the arrangements of their municipal authorities their appreciation of the great event, and their gratitude to the fathers for those blessings which they secured to us."
    ... "Montesquieu had shown in his great work that the separation of powers, judicial, executive and legislative, was the basis of all free government; and, acting upon this, much had been done, even before '89, to improve the administration of justice. The Constitution of '89 gave to France self-government, and recognized the sovereignty of the people. No honest man had anything to fear from this Constitution, but all who lived by oppression and wrong were filled with dismay. The Christian doctrines of Turgot and Montesquieu, and the principle that governments were made for men, and not men for governments, shook the despotic thrones to their base. Their trembling occupants conspired at Mantua and Pilnitz, and formed a league to crush the constitutional government of France.
    "In August, 1792, the armies of despotism arrived on the frontier, threatening to overturn that government, and, if opposed, to reduce Paris to ashes. Then, in the fear and frenzy which ensued, began those acts of violence which have left a stain upon the French Revolution."

  • Sutherland, David, 1777-1855. Christian benevolence, a sermon delivered at Newbury, Vt. before the Washington Benevolent Society, at the celebration of the anniversary of the national independence, July 4, 1812 by David Sutherland. 15 pp. 24 cm.
    "The excellency of the Christian religion.--The precept we have been considering, is a Christian precept. The discourses of Christ that are left on record, and the epistles of his apostles, about with exhortations similar to the words of our text. Indeed, the gospel, like its divine author, is altogether love. No system of fabulous theology can compare with that religion that comes from above. to return love for love for love, is a maxim even among pagans; but to practise benevolence on the principles we have stated, and that to enemies, is a characteristic peculiar to Christianity. It is freely admitted that infidels may appear to do good to others, but it must proceed from some other motive than love to God. In order to this, it is necessary to know God and Jesus Christ, whom he hath sent."

  • Sweetman, Joseph. Religion the foundation of national prosperity, a sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church of Charlton, on the 4th of July, 1810 by Joseph Sweetman. 24 pp. 21 cm.
    "The occasion on which we have assembled should remind us of the obligations we are under to God. To him we are indebted for all our national prosperities, and to him the tribute of our thanksgiving ought always to be paid.
    "A review of the circumstances under which this country was first settled, and the interpositions of providence by whichits interests have been promoted, cannot fail to shew us that no other people have more cause for grateful acknowledgment to the over-ruler of all things than ourselves."
    ... "Nothing but the religion which God has taught us in the scriptures, received in its purity, and accompanied by its power, will support and enforce that morality which is effential to the preservation of our government and the prosperity of our country.
    "The morality of the scriptures is pure, and if practiced, would eradicate tbe evils which embitter the lives of individuals and destroy nations--It would correct abuses, redress grievances, and lead each one to cherish a benevolent heart, and maintain an upright and pious life."

  • Swett, Samuel, 1782-1866. An Address delivered at Salem, July 4, 1806, on a military celebration of the day by the brigade & regimental officers, late commissioned officers, & three independent companies at the request of their officers by Samuel Swett. 20 pp.

  • Swift, Samuel, 1782-1875. An Oration, delivered in Middlebury, at the celebration of the Fourth of July, A.D. 1809, by Samuel Swift. 20 pp. 22 cm.


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  • Taggart, Samuel, 1754-1825. An Oration spoken at Colrain, July 4, 1803, being the anniversary of American independence. 1803. 38 pp.
    "LET us cultivate the public and private virtues, those especially which have religion for their basis. Let us venerate religious institutions, but in a special manner, let us practice the duties which Christianity enjoins, and cultivate the temper it is calculated to inspire, i.e. piety towards GOD, and benevolence to men. We are called a christian nation, let us be christians. We cannot be too much upon our guard against the influence of irreligious and demoralizing principles. They will destroy our social and political happiness in this world, and cast an awful gloom over the prospect of an hereafter. They will sap the foundations of mutual confidence, loosen the bonds of society, and fit people to be ruled only with a rod of iron. In vain shall we look for either political integrity in rulers, or a due sense of the importance of good order and regular subordination among a people without religion and morals."
    ... "Our national independence has been eminently the work of GOD, let us not forget our dependence upon him; he has frequently been our salvation heretofore, and, if we trust in him, we will yet find that he will not desert the work of his hands."

  • Taggart, Samuel, 1754-1825. An Oration delivered at Conway, July 4, 1804: being the anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. Northampton, 1804. 29 pp.
    "The greatest part of our revolutionary heroes and patriots have already gone to the land of silence. In paying a tribute to their memory tho' we cannot, at present, be particular, no one in this assembly will, I trust, forget the name of WASHINGTON who shone in his orbit as a star of the first magnitude. But, whoever was the instrument, the hand that raifed it up was the Lord's; and his hand is not shortened that it cannot save. He can now as easily raise up Washington, or future deliverers, by whatever name they may be distinguished, as he did him whose name will be held in grateful remembrance as long as we shall exist a free and independent nation. But when, as a people, we shall forget that our liberties are the gift of God, and lightly esteem the rock of our political salvation, we shall be in danger of losing them.

    "LET us cultivate the principles of piety and virtue, not that unnatural alliance between church and state, so much talked of and professedly so much dreaded at the present day, but which, in our country, is probably rather an imagination than a reality; but the genuine principles of piety towards God and benevolence to men, which tend to the promotion of every civil and social virtue. A people habitually irreligious cannot be long free. Those who are endeavouring to eradicate the principles of religion and virtue, by discarding christianity, and tapping the foundation of natural religion, however extensive the benevolence may be which they profess, are our worst enemies. Tho' their song may be bewitching as a Syren, to listen to it is equally fatal. The poison of asps is under their tongues. The notion of cultivating morality without religion is nothing but the raving of a distempered fancy, if not rather the fruit of a depraved heart. This is abundantly verified by the bitter experience of all ages. Reduced to general practice it will banish benevolence out of the world, set aside the obligations of an oath, and rend asunder every other tie which, either binds man to man, or connects men in society. Such an event would be sufficient to people a continent with thieves, pick-pockets, robbers, adulterers, and midnight assassins. It would render every man every man's foe.

    "--Such are the conseqences to be expected in this life, from the banishment of religion out of society, but futurity opens a prospect infinitely more awful. The notion that death is an eternal sleep, can last no longer than until the soul's separation from the body. No sooner does the unembodied spirit launch into the invisible world, than it awakes, either to the prospect of inconceivable happiness; or of unutterable and never ending woe. When we reflect upon the height to which depravity of manners, and irreligious principles are arrived in our country, we have reason to tremble for the consequences. But we would fondly hope that the disease is not yet altogether without a remedy. For faith the Lord by the prophet Jeremiah, 'At what instant I shall speak concerning a nation, and concerning a kingdom, to pluck up, and to pull down, and to destroy it. If that nation against whom I have pronounced, turn from their evil, I will repent of the evil that I thought to do unto them.'"

  • Tammany Society. Tammany Society, or Columbian Order, no. I. Order of exercises at the Townhouse in Providence, on the Fourth of July, 1810. 1 sheet ([1] p.) 29 x 24 cm.

  • Taylor, Joshua, 1768-1861. An Oration pronounced before the Republican citizens of Portland, on the Fourth of July, 1805, being the twenty-ninth anniversary of American independence, by Joshua Taylor. 12 pp.

  • Taylor, Oliver S. An Oration, pronounced before the Warren and Knox branches of the Washington Benevolent Society, at Belchertown, on the anniversary of the independence of the United States, July 4, 1815 by Oliver S. Taylor. 20 pp.

  • Telfair, Alexander. An Oration commemorative of American independence, delivered at the Presbyterian church in Savannah, by Alexander Telfair, on the fourth of July, 1813, at the request of a committee of citizens. 29 pp.

  • Test, John, 1771-1849. An Oration delivered ... 4th of July, A.D. 1816, in Brookville, Indiana,. 30 pp. ? cm.

  • Thacher, Moses. Masonic oaths neither morally nor legally binding: an Address, delivered at Weymouth, South Parish, June 21: at Worcester, July 5, on the Fifty-Fourth Anniversary of American Independence; and at Reading, July 12, 1850. Boston, [1830]. 30 pp.
    "FELLOW CITIZENS,
    "The science of Moral and Political Philosophy, is of incalculable importance to mankind, To learn our duty to God, to our country, to ourselves, and to our connexions and relatives in life, is one of the first things, which should be urged upon the understanding and conscience of every rational and moral being. Although theories, in the abstract, are useless, and no system, either of morality or of religion, can be of any avail, unless it is reduced to practice; yet, no person can be reasonably expected to perform his duty, unless he understands it. Ignorance is neithcr the mother of devotion, nor the mother of benevolent exertion. Although it is an old maxim, that 'ignorance of the law excuses no man;' still we must take it for granted, that every man has it in his power to know what the law is, or he would not be a subject of either praise or blame, reward or punishment.
    "I advert, therefore, to the science of Moral and Political Philosophy, hecause it involves those first principles of civil and religious right, without a knowledge of which, we can be neither useful citizens, nor devoted Christians."

  • Thacher, Peter Oxenbridge. An Oration delivered before the inhabitants of the town of Boston, on the thirty-first anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America. 2nd ed. Boston, 1807. 18 pp.
    "Can we, at this moment, view the condition of France, can we reflect on the history of her revolution, without devoutly wishing, that there were between the two countries an impassable gulph. There is no sympathy between us. The genius of the citizens, the principles of the government, and the interest of each, are totally dissimilar. The example of that country has proved, that the excesses of liberty are as terrible as the excesses of despotism. In the destruction of the ancient system, and in pursuit of a flaming meteor, which they called liberty, Frenchmen became so voracious for blood, that from want of other victims, they were devouring one another."

  • Thacher, Samuel. An Oration, pronounced July 4, 1796: at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Concord, in commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1796. 22 pp.
    "We cordially supplicate the SUPREME DIRECTOR OF EVENTS, to enlarge the empire of enlightened reason and pure religion, until virtue, knowledge, liberty and happiness shall become extensive as the globe, permanent as time. But, whatever issue awaits the present European contest, whatever may be the fate of other nations, continue, GREAT AUTHOR OF GOOD, the prosperity of AMERICA, perpetuate our peace, happiness, INDEPENDENCE!"

  • Thacher, Stephen, 1774-1859. An Oration pronounced at Kennebunk, district of Maine, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1803 by Stephen Thachar. 24 pp. 20 cm.

  • Thomas, Daniel, 1778-1847. An Oration, pronounced in the new meeting house at Abington, July 4th, 1810, by Daniel Thomas. 16 pp. 20 cm.

  • Thomas, Elijah, Esq. An Oration delivered in the Presbyterian Meeting-House, in the city of Albany, on the anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1807 at the request of the Albany Military Association by Elijah Thomas, Esquire. 24 pp.

  • Thomas, John Hanson. An Oration delivered in the Presbytarian Meeting House, on Saturday the Fourth of July, 1807, at the request of the Washington Society of Alexandria by John Hanson Thomas, Esq. to which is added an appendix, giving a short account of the Society. 28 pp.

  • Thompson, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Franklin), 1784-1849. An Oration, delivered before the Tammany Society, or, Columbian Order, of Brookhaven, (L.I.) and a numerous assemblage of citizens, on the 36th anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1811 by Benjamin F. Thompson. 16 pp. 16 cm.

  • Thompson, John Champlin, 1790-1831. An Oration, pronounced at Windsor, before a numerous collection of Republicans, on their celebration of the thirty eighth anniversary of American independence. By John Champlin Thompson, Esq. 24 pp. 19 cm.

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  • Thompson, Thomas W. An Oration, pronounced the 4th day of July, 1799, at Salisbury, in the state of New-Hampshire. Concord [N.H.], 1799. 16 pp.
    "The gratitude of a free people, is an oblation that the ministering Angels of Heaven will with pleasure bear to the throne of Him who sways the sceptre of the universe!"

  • Todd, Timothy. An Oration delivered at East Guilford, in Connecticut the Fourth of July, 1801: On the anniversary of American independence / by Timothy Todd. Rutland [Vt.]: Printed by William Fay, [1801] 8 pp.
    "The dangers we have to guard against, are irreligion, impiety, immorality, faction jealousy, discord, envy, malice,hatred, revenge, detraction, defamation, and ingratitude, to which we ought in a special manuer to add, FOREIGN INFLUENCE. These are the Rocks which have shipwrecked every Nation on Earth, and these are the rocks which the United States, ought to shun."

  • Thomson, Ignatius, 1774-1848. An Oration, delivered at Pomfret, July 4th, 1809, commemorating the day that gave our nation birth by Ignatius Thomson. 22 [i.e. 23] pp. ? cm.

  • Tillinghast, Joseph L. (Joseph Leonard), 1791-1844. An Oration pronounced before the citizens of Pawtuxet, on the Fourth of July, 1814, being the thirty-eighth anniversary of American independence by Joseph L. Tillinghast. 23 pp. 23 cm.

  • Toomer, Joshua W. An Oration, delivered in St. Michaels Church, Charleston, South Carolina, on Monday, the Fourth of July, 1814, in commemoration of American independence ... by Joshua W. Toomer. 26 pp. 18 cm.

  • Townsend, Alexander. Oration, delivered July the fourth, 1810, at the request of the selectmen of Boston: on the feelings, manners, and principles that produced American Independence. Boston, 1810. 27 pp.
    "These feelings, manners, and principles were the central fires, that animated the political system of America from the first moment the God of nature cal1ed it into being. It was their combined influence first prompted the resolution in minds, with whom to resolve was to execute, of exploring another world. It was their energy made the primitive pilgrim dare the horrours of the ocean and the howl of the wilderness; that nerved the arm of the woodman in his attempt to make that 'wilderness blossom like the rose.'"

  • Townsend, Walter. Ode to the Fourth of July, 1803 by Walter Townsend set to music by Dr. Jackson. 3, [1] pp.

  • Truman, Harry S., President, U.S. Statement by the President: The Fourth of July, July 4, 1945.
    "AGAIN THIS YEAR we celebrate July 4 as the anniversary of the day one hundred and sixty-nine years ago on which we declared our independence as a sovereign people.
    "In this year of 1945, we have pride in the combined might of this nation which has contributed signally to the defeat of the enemy in Europe. We have confidence that, under Providence, we soon may crush the enemy in the Pacific. We have humility for the guidance that has been given us of God in serving His will as a leader of freedom for the world.
    "This year, the men and women of our armed forces, and many civilians as well, are celebrating the anniversary of American Independence in other countries throughout the world. Citizens of these other lands will understand what we celebrate and why, for freedom is dear to the hearts of all men everywhere. In other lands, others will join us in honoring our declaration that all men are created equal and are endowed with certain inalienable rights--life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
    "Here at home, on this July 4, 1945, let us honor our Nation's creed of liberty, and the men and women of our armed forces who are carrying this creed with them throughout the world."

  • Truman, Harry S., President, U.S. Address at the Ceremonies Commemorating the 175th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1951.
    "Our forefathers in Philadelphia not only established a new nation--they established a nation based on a new idea. They said that all men were created equal. They based the whole idea of government on this God-given equality of men. They said that the people had the right to govern themselves. They said the purpose of government was to protect the unalienable rights of man to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
    ... "The transformation during these 175 years seems to be complete; but it is not. Some things have not changed at all since 1776.
    "For one thing, freedom is still expensive. It still costs money. It still costs blood. It still calls for courage and endurance, not only in soldiers, but in every man and woman who is free and who is determined to remain free. Freedom must be fought for today, just as our fathers had to fight for freedom when the Nation was born.
    "For another thing, the ideas on which our Government is founded--the ideas of equality, of God-given rights, of self-government--are still revolutionary. Since 1776 they have spread around the world. In France in 1789, in Latin America in the early 1800's, in many parts of Europe in the mid-19th century, these ideas produced new governments and new nations. Now in the 20th century, these ideas have stirred the peoples in many countries of the Middle East and Asia to create free governments, dedicated to the welfare of the people. The ideas of the American Revolution are still on the march."

  • Tudor, William. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1809, at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1809. 22 pp.
    "Our ancestors left their homes and their country, not for any infraction of their political rights, but to avoid persecution for their religious opinions. They embarked for these then unexplored regions, not in search for gold, or in pursuit of traffick; not in thirst for conquest, or through want of subsistence, but to enjoy freedom of religion."

  • Tufts, Joseph, 1783-1835. An Oration, pronounced before the Federal Republicans of Charlestown, Massachusetts, July 4, 1814 ..., by Joseph Tufts, Jun. 14, [2] pp.

  • Turnbull, Robert J. (Robert James). Speech of R.J. Turnbull, Esq. at the celebration of the State Rights and Free Trade Party of Charleston: on the fourth of July, 1831. Columbia, S.C, 1831. 15 pp.
    "I have not, my fellow-citizens, language adequate to express to you the gratitude which I feel, for the flattering manner in which you have been pleased to receive this sentiment. This distinguished token of your approbation is the more gratifying to me, because it assures me of your high veneration for the public principles which it has been my pride to advocate. It is because, fellow-citizens, you honor the conservative principles of Thomas Jefferson, that you are thus kindly disposed to magnify my humble labours into the exalted honor of 'uplifting an invincible arm' in defence of the liberties of my country. Would to God that I could strike deeper, and yet deeper still, in defence of those great principles of constitutional freedom, in which are involved in a peculiar manner the prosperity and safety of the south."

  • Turner, Henry E. An Oration delivered at East Greenwich, on the Fourth of July, 1809, at the request of the Kentish guards Henry E. Turner published by the author's friends. 12 pp.


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  • Upham, Thomas Cogswell. The Home in the West: a poem delivered at Dartmouth College, July 4, 1817. Hanover [N.H.], 1817. 18 pp.


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  • Van Heuvel, J. A. (Jacob Adrien). (1787-1874) An Oration delivered at Ogdensburgh, New-York, on the Fourth of July 1827: at the celebration of the fifty-first anniversary of American Independence. [New York]; Ogdensburgh; New York, 1827. 26 pp.
    "It was at an early period of these civil troubles, that a number of families in England, sorely oppressed by the denial of those religious privilegs which they valued dearer than life, and desirous to withdraw from that scene of contention, which the tyranny set over them was gradually covering with darker and darker shades, retired to Holland; a country at that time the foremost in the defence of the Protestant liberties of Europe, and the asylum of the oppressed of all nations, there to remain while the storm of persecution lasted. Several years they resided in that country; but despairing at length of any change at home favourable to religious toleration, they came to the solemn resolution to cross the wide ocean to the newly discovered world, to establish there, in the depths of its forests, a foundation for their civil and religious liberties, far beyond any human control. They accordingly returned to England to prepare for the enterprise; and having fitted out a vessel, embarked from Plymouth on the 6th September, 1620. Such an undertaking to those who resolved on it, must have been of the most appalling nature. The improvements in the science of navigation and ship building, render a voyage across the ocean now of slight moment; but vessels at that period were greatly inferior in comfort and speed to those of the present day. The ocean was then but rarely crossed; by none but the boldest and most resolute; men, who, with souls cased in adamant, launched forth upon it, to engage in scenes of distant enterprise in other portions of the new world. Valiant soldiers and hardy seamen alone were seen upon its broad waters. Commerce had not then begun to send forth even the man of ordinary business, the merchant to traverse it. But who composed the little band of pilgrims, who for the protection of their rights and liberties ventured on the perilous voyage? Not alone men in the prime of life, with constitutions hardened to fatigue, and minds enured to struggle with difficulty, but mothers and their children, clinging to their husbands and fathers, composed two-thirds of the whole company, which amounted to 101 souls. They left the comforts of a world grown old in civilization and improvement; they bid farewell to their native land, now glancing upon them to revive in their memory the fond recollection of the scenes of their childhood and riper age, gloomy as they had been rendered by the oppressions from which they fled, still delightful to dwell upon; not as-- their former departure for a short and temporary period, but to build themselves up a country in a distant hemisphere, which was to be their home and habitation forever."

    ... "You are the actual rulers of the country. The officers of government are but delegates of your power, chosen by your voice. Directly or indirectly, all authority flows from you; from the chief Magistrate of the Union, to the lowest officer in a state. On you, therefore, rests the responsibility of having the stations in your government filled by real friends to their country, and its free institutions, not in word, but in very deed; men of upright and honorable views, scoring to sacrifice the interests of their country to their sinister ends. If such men are chosen by you to seats in the national or state legislatures, you need fear no encroachments from the former--no disunion among the latter. You may sometimes be deceived by appearances; but the frequency of elections enables you to redress the evil, if the remedy is not too long delayed. When the streams of authority that flow from your hands become corrupt, they may be purified by new draughts from the fountain of power. The elective franchise is the palladium placed in your hands to preserve the liberties of your country. Duly estimate, then, the importance of the trust. Let it be considered a sacred charge, and exercised with deliberate, serious reflection. Examine thoroughly the fitness, in rectitude of purpose as well as intelligence and experience of candidates, presented for your choice, and confide your powers to none but those who are in all these respects worthy of your confidence--and the Republic is safe! Trust not too much to loud and vehement professions of extreme regard for you. Let not the poison of flattery seduce you from your duty. Power, in whatever form, is destined to be the object of adulation."

  • Van Ness, Cornelius P. (Cornelius Peter), 1782-1852. An Oration delivered at Jerico, July 4, 1809, by C.P. Van Ness, Esq. 24 pp.

  • Van Ness, Cornelius P. (Cornelius Peter), 1782-1852. An Oration delivered at Williston, July 4th, 1812, to a general and very numerous meeting of the Republicans of Chittenden County by Cornelius P. Van Ness. 48 pp. 20 cm.

  • Van Pelt, Peter I., 1778-1861. The Happiness of Israel and America, a Discourse, delivered by request, on the Fourth of July, 1803 by Peter I. Van Pelt. 24 pp. ? cm.

  • Van Pelt, Peter I., 1778-1861. Goodness of God to be praised by men: A Discourse, delivered on the Fourth of July, in the North Brick Church, by Peter I. Van Pelt. 16 pp.

  • Van Pelt, Peter I., 1778-1861. The goodness of God to be praised by men ..., a Discourse delivered on the Fourth of July, in the North Brick Church by P. I. Van Pelt. 23 pp.

  • Varnum, Benjamin F. An Address delivered at the Republican celebration of independence, on the 4th of July, 1818, at the meeting house at the westerly parish in Dracutt by Benjamin F. Varnum. 12 pp.

  • Vechten, Philip van, d. 1814. Oration prepared at the request of the committee of arrangement appointed by the Common Council of the city of Albany, for celebrating the 37th anniversary of American independence, by P. van Vechten. 13 pp.

  • The Vermont almanac and register, for the year of our Lord 1797: being the first after leap-year, and until July fourth, the twenty-first of the Independence of America . Prnted [sic] at Rutland, (Vermont.), [1796]. 60 pp.

  • The Vermont almanac and register, for the year of our Lord 1800: being until July fourth, the twenty fourth year of American Independence. Printed at Rutland, Vermont, [1799]. 36 pp.

  • Verplanck, Gulian C. (Gulian Crommelin). An Oration delivered July 4th, 1809, in the North Dutch Church: before the Washington Benevolent Society of the City of New York. New-York, 1809. 18 pp.
    "Let us recollect, too, that the Almighty in the various operations both of the natural and moral world often condescends to act through the medium of human agens; that though he watereth the furrows of the earth, and sendeth rain into the little vallies thereof, and maketh it soft with the drops of rain, yet he requires the toil and the skill of the husbandman ere the vallies stand thick with corn."

  • Vose, John, 1766-1840. An Oration, pronounced at Bedford, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1809, by John Vose. 16 pp. 22 cm.


    W
  • Waldo, Daniel. The Causes and remedies of national division: illustrated in a Discourse delivered in Suffield 1st Society, July 4th, 1804. Suffield [Conn.], 1804. 22 pp.
    "Our strongest hope that the demon of faction will be banished from America, rests upon parental exertion, prospered by a divine blessing. Let no Infidel preceptor ever take the charge of your children--he will secretly poison the spring of moral action.
    "Early instruct them in the religion of Jesus, and let your example be a constant lecture upon the word of God. Teach them to reverence the sabbath as the Lord's day, and revive the ancient custom of catechizing them, and of restraining them from those recreations, which would be innocent upon other days."

  • Waldo, Daniel, 1762-1864. The Causes and remedies of national division, illustrated in a Discourse delivered in Suffield 1st Society, July 4th, 1804 by Daniel Waldo. 23 pp. 19 cm.

  • Waldo, S. Putnam (Samuel Putnam), 1780-1826. An Oration pronounced at East-Windsor, on the Fourth of July, A.D. 1805, by Samuel Putnam Waldo. 22 pp.

  • Walker, Amasa. An Address delivered before the young men of Boston associated for moral and intellectual improvement on the fiftyseventh [sic] anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1833. 30 pp.
    "Intelligence and virtue are the two great pillrs on which this fabric rests. So our fathers have told us; so we believe. Whatever shall strengthen these, gives durability and security to the whole structure. If these be rendered firm and immovable, all is safe; if they be not, in vain are all our toils. To perfect these, then, is the object of our highest ambition."

  • Wallace, John, 1789-1826. An Oration delivered at New-Salem on the thirty third anniversary of American independence, by John Wallace. 16 pp.

  • Wallace, John. An Oration delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society in Newbury, Vermont, on the Fourth of July, 1812. Windsor [Vt.], 1812. 14 pp.
    "The magnificent theme is incorporated with the rudiments of education--it is studied with the avidity of Youthful patriotism, and cherished with the ardor of national pride. May our revolution never cease to awaken feeliqgs of proud recollection in every American bosom; and tho' the time forbid to enter upon the detail of its progress, we pledge ourselves to cherish the spirit, which produced it, and to maintain the firmness, which sustained its trials."

  • Ward, Jonathan. A Sermon delivered at Plymouth, N.H., July 4, 1825, in commemoration of American Independence. Plymouth [N.H.], 1826. 27 pp.
    "The interposition of Heaven in our favor has been truly striking; and we may, with the utmost propriety, exclaim in the words of our text, 'If it had not been the Lord, who was on our side, when men rose up against us; then they had swallowed us up quick, when their 'Hath was kindled against us.' This is manifest from the declarations of scripture and from fact."

  • Ware, Ashur. An Oration delivered before the Washington Society in Boston, on the fourth of July, 1816. Boston, 1816. 15 pp.
    "The declaration of independence was then the first effectual assertion, at least in modern times, of the natural rights of man. Our fathers did not approach a tyrannical monarch and his prostigate ministers with courtly complaisance, with the voice of entreaty and supplication. The only throne to which they acknowledged allegiance was the throne of God, and the only majesty to which their prayers were addressed, was the Majesty of heaven. To human dignities and earthly thrones, they spoke in the language of men conscious of their rights. They did not disgrace these rights, by giving them the name of privileges, and tracing them to the grants and concessions of previous monarchs. They declared themselves free because God had made them so.

    "The principle, on which we justify the patriots of '76, is the soul of all our political institutions, the natural and inborn right of man to self-government; a right that can neither be strengthened nor impaired by precedent or prescription. On this principle the statesmen of our country have erected a scheme of civil polity, which, while it is the pride and glory of America, has extorted the admiration of the wise and good of other countries."

  • Ware, Ashur. An Oration delivered before the Republicans of Portland, July the fourth 1817. Portland [Me.], 1817. 13 pp.
    "It is our boast and glory that the government of this country possesses no such fearful power; and I trust that for ages to come, it will be our pride and happiness that a gloomy and blood-thirsty bigot cannot by the breath of his mouth doom the lights and ornaments of our republic, to chains, dungeons and the scaffold. It is strong enough to second the designs of nature, and aid the bounties of Providence, to assist the nation in developing its resources, and giving stability to its prosperity; but long may it be destitute of that disastrous strength that can wage successful war with the beneficence of an overruling Providence, that can change our cultivated fields, our flourishing towns, and smiling villages into a howling desert; that can convert our halls of legislation into the miserable receptacles of drowsy monks, and our temples of justice into the charnel-houses of a bloody inquisition."

  • Warner, G. J. (George James). Means for the Preservation of Public Liberty: An Oration delivered in the New Dutch Church, on the Fourth of July, 1797, being the twenty-first Anniversary of Our Independence. New-York, 1797. 20 pp.
    And first, in addition to the found system of Legislative policy which has been GENERALLY adopted in our country, and has grown out of the principles of our Revolution, we must individually encourage by example and by precept, the practice of all the moral virtues. Without these no free government can long exist. That they are the only true sources of individual happiness is generally collected, though unfortunately they are but little practiced.
    The Bible, a venerable old book, now too often laid by on the shelf, dusty and neglected, contains an ample enumeration of them, and a glorious promise of the advantages resulting from their general application and use. This leading principle in the composition of a free government, 'Do unto others as you would others should do unto you,' is derived from that invaluable source; and were all our actions performed under the influence of this principle, union, equal liberty, and the steady administration of juftice might certainly be expected as the happy result. We should then become better men, more disinterested patriots and honester politicians. For what man is there who possesses virtuous sentiments himself, and would not cherish and approve of them in others? Who that sincerely loves liberty, would not conscientiously with its enjoymcnt to ail the members of the community, and join in every proper measure necessary to its preservation?

  • Warren, John. An Oration, delivered July 4th, 1783: at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston, in celebration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston (Commonwealth of Massachsetts [sic]), [1783]. 31 pp.
    "The laws and penalties by which subjects are compelled to promote the general interests of a community, should ever be instituted with a special reference to these principles, and the greatest perfection of human government consists in the judiciousness of this application."

  • Washington, George. George Washington, July 9, 1776, General Orders. Head Quarters, New York, July 9, 1776. Published in The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    ... The Hon. Continental Congress having been pleased to allow a Chaplain to each Regiment, with the pay of Thirty-three Dollars and one third pr month--The Colonels or commanding officers of each regiment are directed to procure Chaplains accordingly; persons of good Characters and exemplary lives--To see that all inferior officers and soldiers pay them a suitable respect and attend carefully upon religious exercises. The blessing and protection of Heaven are at all times necessary but especially so in times of public distress and danger--The General hopes and trusts, that every officer and man, will endeavour so to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier defending the dearest Rights and Liberties of his country.
    The Hon. The Continental Congress, impelled by the dictates of duty, policy and necessity, having been pleased to dissolve the Connection which subsisted between this Country, and Great Britain, and to declare the United Colonies of North America, free and independent States: The several brigades are to be drawn up this evening on their respective Parades, at Six OClock, when the declaration of Congress, shewing the grounds and reasons of this measure, is to be read with an audible voice.
    The General hopes this important Event will serve as a fresh incentive to every officer, and soldier, to act with Fidelity and Courage, as knowing that now the peace and safety of his Country depends (under God) solely on the success of our arms: And that he is now in the service of a State, possessed of sufficient power to reward his merit, and advance him to the highest Honors of a free Country.

  • Washington, George. George Washington, July 3, 1778, General Orders. Head Quarters, Brunswick Landing. July 3, 1778. Published in The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    AFTER ORDERS
    Tomorrow, the Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence will be celebrated by the firing thirteen Pieces of Cannon and a feu de joie of the whole line; the Army will be formed on the Brunswick side of the Rariton at five o'Clock in the afternoon on the ground pointed out by the Quarter Master General. The Soldiers are to adorn their Hats with Green-Boughs and to make the best appearance possible. The disposition will be given in the orders of tomorrow. Double allowance of rum will be served out.

  • Washington, George. George Washington, July 3, 1778, General Orders. Head Quarters, Brunswick, Saturday, July 4, 1778. Published in The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    At three o'Clock this afternoon a Cannon will fire at the Park as a signal for the troops to be put under Arms and formed ready to march. At four another signal Cannon for the Right to march by the Right over the Bridge to the Ground which shall be shewn them to form on. At half past four a third signal Cannon for the Left Wing to march by the Right and follow the Right Wing. At five a fourth Signal for the second Line to form on the ground which shall be shewn them. After the Army is formed, upon a signal by order of the Commander in Chief, thirteen Pieces of Cannon will be discharged, after which a single Cannon which will be a signal for a tuning fire to begin on the right of the Army and be continued to the left with Musquetry and Cannon. At the Conclusion of which, on a signal, three Cheers will be given, "Perpetual and undisturbed Independence to the United States of America."

  • Washington Society. Celebration of the Washington Society. Ode for the Fourth of July. Tune--"Hail Columbia." By a member of the Society. 1 sheet.

  • Washington Society (Boston, Mass.). An Historical view of the public celebrations of the Washington Society and those of the Young Republicans: from 1805 to 1822. Boston, 1823. 137 pp. Also here.

  • Waterman, Jotham, 1774-1836. An Oration pronounced at Orleans, July 4, 1809, thirty first anniversary of American independence by Jotham Waterman. 33 (i.e. 31) pp. 22 cm.

  • Waterman, Thomas. An Address delivered before the Republican Citizens of Concord, N.H., assembled to celebrate the anniversary of American Independence, Friday, July 4, 1806. Amherst [Mass.], 1806. 13 pp.
    "The world has long since appreciated the merits of the cause, and witnessed the happy result of the conflict. Let me then rather engage your attention, while I sugges a few thoughts on the fitness and propriety of the independent station we occupy among the nations, the invaluable blessings, with which it is attended, and the wieghty obligations imposed upon us by this auspicious dispensation of an over-ruling Providence."

  • Webster, Daniel. An Oration, pronounced at Hanover, New-Hampshire, the 4th day of July, 1800: being the twenty-fourth anniversary of American Independence. Hanover [N.H.], 1800. 14 pp.
    ... "Thus, friends and citizens, did the kind hand of over-ruling Providence conduct us, through toils, fatigues and dangers, to Independence and Peace. If piety be the rational exercise of the human soul, if religion be not a chimera, and if the vestiges of heavenly assistance are clearly traced in those events, which mark the annals of our nation, it becomes us, on this day, in consideration of the great things, which the Lord has done for us, to render the tribute of unfeigned thanks, to that God, who superintends the Universe, and holds aloft the scale, that weighs the destinies of nations."

  • Webster, Daniel. An Anniversary Address, delivered before the Federal gentlemen of Concord and its vicinity, July 4th, 1806. Concord [N.H.], 1806. 19 pp.
    "But virtue hath its essence in religious sentiment. Without that, virtue is a realm of frost. Its influence is colder than the Northern star. The temple and the altar are the best pledges of national happiness, and he that worships there, is the best citizen. It is well to cherish the expectation of future being. Would you have good citizens? Leave to men, then, the consolations of religious hope. the altar of our freedom should be placed near to the altar of our Religion. Thus shall the same Almighty Power, who protects his own worship, protect also our Liberties."

  • Webster, Daniel. An Address delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society at Portsmouth, July 4, 1812. Portsmouth, N.H, [1812]. 25 pp.
    "But Washington could neither be intimidated, nor deceived. He saw the path of impartiality and justice open before him. It was illuminated with all the light of heaven. It conducted to the true glory and happiness of his Country. He entered, and pursued it."

  • Webster, Daniel. Mr. Webster's Address at the laying of the corner stone of the addition to the Capitol: July 4th, 1851. Washington, 1851. 14 pp.
    "And I now proceed to add, that the strong and deep-settled conviction of all intelligent persons amongst us is, that in order to support a useful and wise Government upon these popular principles, the general education of the people, and the wide diffusion of pure morality and true religion, are indispensable. Individual virtue is a part of public virtue."
    Cornerstone inscription: "And all here assembled, whether belonging to public life or to private life, with hearts devoutly thankful to Almighty God for the preservation of the liberty and happiness of the country, unite in sincere and fervent prayers that this deposite, and the walls and arches, the domes and towers, the columns and entablatures now to be erected over it may endure forever!"

  • Webster, Daniel. Newly discovered fourth of July Oration / by the illustrious orator and statesman Daniel Webster, delivered at Fryeburg, Me. in the year 1802. Boston, Mass., 1882. 20 pp.

  • Webster, Ezekiel. An Oration delivered at Salisbury, New-Hampshire, July 4, 1807. Concord [N.H.], 1807. 13 pp.
    "But I trust in God there is a spirit of Liberty in this country, a spirit that has descended to us from our fathers, which can neither be deluded nor subdued; a spirit not habitually given to distrust, but which is not charitable in the face of undenied facts; a spirit of attention and vigilance, which sees oppression even at a distance, and snuffs it in the tainted gale."
    "... A love of equality is likewise necessary in a Republic. But it must be that equality, which God and nature have instituted."

  • Webster, Noah. An Oration pronounced before the citizens of New-Haven on the anniversary of the Independence of the United States, July 4th 1798. New-Haven, [1798]. 15 pp.
    "Twenty and two years are completed, since the fathers of our empire, appealing to God and the impartial world, for the purity of their motives, rent asunder the bands that connected the English colonies with their mother country, and declared them an INDEPENDENT NATION."
    ... "the christian and the lover of freedom may consider this continent as destined by Heaven, to save and to foster the seeds of a pure church and excellent constitutions of government, which may hereafter be transplanted to Europe, when the hostile spirit of the present revolution shall have swept away all the old establishments."

  • Webster, Noah. An Oration pronounced before the citizens of New Haven: on the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July, 1802. New Haven [Conn.], 1802. 28 pp. Also here.
    "The history of the first English settlements in America, and of the measures which prepared the way for a revolution in the colonies, is too interesting not to be well understood by men of common curiosity and reading in this State. That history unfolds a series of great events, evidently suited to accomplish important purposes in the economy of Divine Providence .... events which every American of expanded views must contemplate with admiration and every Christian, with delight."

  • Webster, Noah. An Oration pronounced before the Knox and Warren branches of the Washington Benevolent Society at Amherst: on the celebration of the anniversary ... . Northampton [Mass.], 1814. 32 pp.
    "That different governments within the limitsof the United States might occasionally engage in war, is not impossible nor improbable. Men will be proud, selfish, unjust and revengeful; and war is the calamity which a just God inflicts upon nations to punish them for their vices and crimes. That this evil would frequently occur in America, is against all probability; as we are exempt from many of the usual causes of hostility, and as a spirit of industry and commerce seems to be extinguishing the love of war. This spirit is powerfully aided by the principles of the Christian religion, and a disposition to apply the talents and resources of the country to the propagation of the GOSPEL OF PEACE."
    ..."The day we celebrate has ever been considered as auspicious to the freedom, the commerce, and the welfare of the United States. Under a wise administration, our Independence has proved an invaluable blassing. Let us not despair; but commit our country to that Being who is able to bring order out of confusion, and light out of darkness. Let us remain quiet citizens, and faithful subjects of the government, using our influence to correct its abuses; at the same time, reforming our own vices; and praying for the peace and prosperity of our country."

  • Wells, John. An Oration delivered on the Fourth of July, 1798, at St. Paul's Church: before the young men of the city of New-York, assembled to commemorate thier national independence. New-York, 1798. 20 pp.
    "In this solemn determination be THIS DAY taken, relying on the just provident of our God, our Independence will still be saved--its value will be enhanced--and our posterity will feel the encreased duty of preserving an inheritance gained and transmitted to them with so much blood, toil, and difficulty; and we, ourselves, may live to see our country Triumphant, Honoured and Respected."

  • Wells, Samuel Adams. An Oration pronounced July 5, 1819: at the request of the republicans of the town of Boston, in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1819. 28 pp.
    "When we reflect, fellow citizens, on the innumerable blessings we enjoy; the few, very few evils we suffer, we shall find great reason to rejoice in being citizens of a country so abundantly favored by Heaven."

  • Wendover, P. H. (Peter Hercules), 1768-1834. National deliverance. An Oration delivered in the New Dutch Church, in the city of New-York, on the Fourth of July, 1806, being the thirtieth anniversary of American independence, before the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, Tammany Society, or Columbian Order, New-York Cooper's, Taylor's [sic], Hatter's, Mason's, Ship-wright's, and Hibernian Provident Societies, and a numerous concourse of other citizens. By P.H. Wendover, of the Mechanic Society. 16 pp. 22 cm.

  • Wentworth, John, 1737-1820. An Oration, delivered at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the Fourth July, 1804, by John Wentworth. 20 pp.

  • Weston, Daniel, 1764-1837. An Oration pronounced at Gray, Maine, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1809, by Daniel Weston. 11 pp. 21 cm.

  • Weston, Nathan, 1782-1872.An Oration, pronounced July 4th, 1810, before the Republican citizens of Augusta and the neighbouring towns, in commemoration of American independence, by Nathan Weston, Jun. 19 pp. 20 cm.

  • Wheaton, Henry. An Oration delivered before the Tammany Society, or Columbian Order, and the republican citizens of Providence and its Vicinity: at the Town-House, on the Anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1810. Providence [R.I.]; ([Providence, R.I.]), [1810]. 19 pp.
    "While we prostrate ourselves in profound adoration at the feet of that Being, under whose protection we have arrived at this our present maturity of national greatness, it becomes us seriously to enquire into the causes which raised us to independence; the means of preserving it; the dangers which threaten our liberties, and the precautions by which those dangers may be averted."

  • Wheaton, Henry, 1785-1848. An Oration delivered before the different Republican societies, at the theatre, Anthony-St., New York, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1814 by Henry Wheaton. 23 pp. 20 cm.

  • Whelpley, Samuel, 1766-1817. An Oration by the Rev. Samuel Whelpley, delivered, in consequence of his illness, by his son Melancton P. Whelpley, in the Presbyterian Church in Morris-town, July 4, 1809. 14 pp.

  • Whipple, Edwin Percy. (1819-1886) Washington and the principles of the revolution: an oration delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston, at the celebration of the Declaration of American Independence, July 4, 1850. 2nd edition. Boston: J. H. Eastburn, 1850. 49 pp.

    "Our political institutions, again, are but the body of which liberty is the soul; their preservation depends on their being continually inspired by the light and heat of the sentiment and idea whence they sprung; and when we timorously suspend, according to the latest political fashion, the truest and dearest maxims of our freedom at the call of expediency or the threat of passion, -- when we convert politics into a mere game of interests, unhallowed by a single great and unselfish principle, -- we may be sure that our worst passions are busy 'forging our fetters;' that we are proposing all those intricate problems which red republicanism so swiftly solves, and giving Manifest Destiny pertinent hints to shout new anthems of atheism over victorious rapine. The liberty which our fathers planted, and for which they sturdily contended, and under which they grandly conquered, is a rational and temperate but brave and unyielding freedom, the august mother of institutions, the hardy nurse of enterprise, the sworn ally of justice and order; a Liberty that lifts her awful and rebuking face equally upon the cowards who would sell, and the braggarts who would prevert, her precious gifts of rights and obligations; and this Liberty we are solemnly bound at all hazards to protect, at any sacrifice to preserve, and by all just means to extend, against the unbridled excesses of that ugly and brazen hag, originally scorned and detested by those who unwisely gave her infancy a home, but which now, in her enormous growth and favored deformity, reels with blood-shot eyes, and dishevelled tresses, and words - of unshamed slavishness, into halls where Liberty should sit throned!"

  • White, Edwin A. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, Massachusetts, July 4, 1814: in commemoration of American independence . Worcester [Mass.]: Printed by Henry Rogers, 1814. 18 pp.; 22 cm.

  • White, Phinehas, 1770-1847. An Oration, delivered at Dummerston, Vt., July 4, 1815, in commemoration of the 39th anniversary of American independence by Phinehas White published at the request of the committee of arrangements. 22 pp. 23 cm.

  • White, Steele. An Oration, commemorative of American independence, delivered on the Fourth of July, 1810, by Steele White. 22 pp.

  • White, William, 1783-1831. An Address, made at Union, (Maine), July 4th, 1810, by William White. 16 pp. 25 cm.

  • White, William Charles, 1777-1818. An Oration, pronounced in the meeting house, at Rutland, July 5th, 1802. 18 pp.

  • White, William Charles, 1777-1818. An Oration, pronounced at Worcester, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4th, 1804, William Charles White. 22 pp. 22 cm.

  • White, William Charles, 1777-1818. An Oration in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence, delivered in Boston, July 4th, 1809, at the request of the Bunker-Hill Association by William Charles White to which is added, an introductory address, by David Everett. 17 pp. 22 cm.

  • White, William Charles. An Oration pronounced at Hubbardston, July 4, 1810, the thirty fourth anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1810. 18 pp.
    "O my dear little ones, you know not now the happiness that awaits you. You know not the blood that was shed for you. Yes, your fathers did not fight and bleed for themselves alone: they fought and bled for you also.
    "Alas, they have not long to abide here. A few more years and their spirits will mingle with those of eternity. And when the ashes of the grave shall cover them, when the earth, shall hide them from your sight forever; when you have ran the happy race of boyhood, and are called upon to fill your stations in the world; then, O then, my dear children, forget not this day; but imitate the noble example your fathers have set you. On every return of this anniversary, gather round the altars of your country, and celebrate the blessings of heaven, and the virtures of your ancestors. Take your children in your arms, who are to be the future fathers of a more distant generation; and in your turn teach them also the divine lessons of liberty."

  • White, William S. (William Spottswood). 4th of July reminiscences and reflections: A Sermon preached in the Presbyterian church, Charlottesville, July 5th, 1840. Charlottesville, 1840. 19 pp.
    "A GRATEFUL sense of God's goodness is highly proper at all times. No day ever passes without pouring upon our persons and upon our families a profusion of the richest blessings. These blessings we enjoy in our individual, social and national capacity. Hence, our gratitude and praise should ascend, at one time, from the solitude of the closet, and at another from the midst of the great congregation. Times and seasons too should be sset apart, when special pains should be taken to give elevation and intensity to our feelings--when signal instances of the Divine favor should be commemorated by special prayer and praise. To this statement the whole American people have assented, by remembering and celebrating as they do the Fourth Day of July."

  • Whiting, Thurston. An Oration delivered in the Baptist Meeting House, in Thomaston, July 4th, 1798: at the request of the Friendly Society, and in commemoration of American Independence. Hallowell [Me.], [1798]. 21 pp.
    "Hence we see, brethren, what were the principles and motives, and some of the concurring providences of Almighty God, which led the way to the settlement of this country, and laid the foundation of our rising empire. Our fathers, at every hazard, planted religion--virtue--freedom in the land. These they loved more than their lives--these they cultivated, cherished and strictly guarded--and these they transmitted, pure and unimpaired, to their immediate descendants,: and now we, aftrer a few, and but few, intervening generations, have risen up in their steead, and entererd upon the preciious inheritance."

  • Whitman, Benjamin, 1768-1840. An Oration, pronounced at Hanover, Massachusetts, on the anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1803, at the request of the officers of the Second regiment, first brigade, fifth division of the militia of Massachusetts by Benjamin Whitman. 24 pp. 22 cm.

  • Whitman, Benjamin. An Oration pronounced at Hanover, Massachusetts, on the anniversary of American Independence, July 4, 1803: at the request of the officers of the second regiment, first brigade, fifth division of the militia of Massachusetts. Boston, 1803. 24 pp.
    "The government of this country, adopted by our fathers, and which they have bequeathed to us as our richest inheritance, was republican. It ought to be our care so to use it, as to transmit it uncorrupted to our children. A republican is the only legitimate government that can be adopted by man; all others arise from imposition. Man by nature is accountrable to no one but his Maker. Whenever he associates with his fellows, he has then the right to stipulate, on what conditions his social intercourse shall continue. In this sense, we are all born free and dqual; but having become members of a body politic, and during our connection with any government, to attempt its destruction, or the subversion of its laws, is ingratitude, is treason."

  • Whitman, Ezekiel. An Oration, commemorative of the day of the declaration of the independence of the United States of America delivered at New-Gloucester, July 4th, A.D. 1801. Portland [Me.]: From the press of E.A. Jenks, 1801. 24 pp.; 21 cm.
    "Our government is a government of laws, and not of men. We are as the great God of Nature designed we should be, all equal. this perhaps is almost the only country in the world in which this can be said to be the case. No one man here can claim a right to domineer over another; or to oppress him in the least degree. Every one is entitled to the fruits of his labor; and to a participation in the civil government."

  • Whitman, Ezekiel, 1776-1866. An Oration, commemorative of the day of the declaration of the independence of the United States of America delivered at New-Gloucester, July 4th, A.D. 1801 by Ezekiel Whitman. 24 pp. 21 cm.

  • Whitney, Peter, 1744-1816. American Independence Vindicated: A Sermon delivered September 12, 1776. At a lecture appointed for publishing the Declaration of Independence passed July 4, 1776. By the representatives of the United States of America in general congress assembled: And now printed at the desire of the hearers to whom it is inscribed. / By Peter Whitney, A.M. Pastor of the Church of Christ in Northborough. State of Massachusetts-Bay. Boston: Printed by E. Draper, in Newbury-Street, M,DCC,LXXVII. [1777] 55, [1] pp.; 20 cm. (8vo)

  • Whitwell, Benjamin. An Oration pronounced July 4, 1814, at the request of the selectmen of the town of Boston: in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Boston, 1814. 17 pp. Also here.
    "It was the first principle of our ancestors to fear God and serve their country; brave and free, they knew no other fear, they yielded no other service. They understood the nature of civil and religious rights, as well those they retained, as those they had yielded; and when persecuted by their sovereign for religious opinions, they never forgot their allegiance, while they rigidly asserted their personal privileges; their ardent piety elevated their views beyond the joys and sorrows of life, and encouraged them to encounter the perils incident to a new settlement in the American wilderness. Such principles and feelings formed the manners of our ancestors, and these they bequeathed to posterity. By these were a hardy race of yeomanry readily converted into soldiers, at the period when the connection between the mother country and her colonies was dissolved; the child asserted the rights of maturity, and the parent after a struggle consented to acknowledge the claim."

  • Willard, Jacob. An Oration delivered in Leominster, July 4, 1809, upon the anniversary of the independence of the United States of America, by Jacob Willard. 15 pp.

  • Willard, Jacob. An Oration, delivered on the Fourth of July, 1812, before the inhabitants of Marblehead, in commemoration of American independence, by Jacob Willard. 16 pp.

  • Willard, Joseph. An Oration delivered at Lancaster, Mass., in celebration of American Independence, July, 1825. Boston; (Boston), 1825. 25 pp.
    "We also have a sacred duty to perform; it is not to lay foundations, and build thereupon,--that has already been done by venerable men. Our duty is to sustain the noble fabric; to enter it with clean hands and pure hearts; to guard and hand down a spotless administration of justice; to discountenance all tumult; to improve our systems of education; to protect our excellent constitutions from those, who, under the name of reform, would touch them with unskilful hands; to ward off intrigue and corrumption, that may one day break in like a flood; and, whilst we reverence the institutions of religion, to avoid the persecution that consists, not at the present day in fire and faggot, but in a spirit intolerant, in remarks severe and cruel, in suspicions of the sincerity of those who do not see with our eyes."

  • Willard, Samuel, 1775-1859. An Oration, delivered at Topsham, district of Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1805, the anniversary of American independence, at the request of the Federal Republicans of Brunswick and Topsham by Samuel Willard. 16 pp.

  • Williams, John Mason, 1780-1868. An Oration pronounced at New Bedford, July 4th, 1806, by John M. Williams, Esq. 15 pp.

  • Withington, Leonard. The Belle of Zion. Boston [Mass.], 1840. 245 pp.
    "It is the Christian's deep feeling, joyous heart, animated countenance, and tender solicitude for the welfare of otheres, by which the Holy Spirit often makes the word of God as 'the fire and the hammer that breaketh the flinty' heart 'in pieces.' Therefore, every cold-hearted or lukewarm Christian should constantly pray, 'Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation, and uphold me with thy free Spirit; then will I teach transgressors thy ways, and sinners shall be converted unto thee."

  • Wilde, Samuel S. (Samuel Sumner). An Oration delivered at Thomaston, July 4th, 1797: at the request of the Friendly Society and in commemoration of the anniversary of American Independence. Hallowell [Me.], 1797. 15 pp.
    "On this day, fellow citizens, which ought to be commemorated as the birth day of American Liberty, it may be proper to indulge the remembrance of those brilliant events, in which she originated; and to refresh in our minds those ardent principles of Patriotism, and that fervid love of our Country, which, under divine protection, have hitherto cherished and supported her.

  • Willard, Paul. An Oration, pronounced at Charlestown on the 4th July, 1821: at the request of the Republican citizens of that town, in commemoration of the anniversary of national independence. Boston, 1821. 15 pp. Also here.
    "Beyond the reach of the trammels which had heretofore bound them, men began to think for themselves. They found they had power to will and to do. The means of communicating knowledge had become easy and common, which wonderfully accelerated these inquiries and the advances of intellect. A change was imperceptibly wrought in their religious sentiments, and in their views of social rights and duties. Christianity unfolded her pure principles, and taught men their relation to each other, and to their God that all men are equal, and that conscience is amenable to no human tribunal. The developement of these truths, which had been concealed for centuries by the dignitaries of the church, powerfully co-operated to hasten the overthrow of political usurpation. Ignorance and superstition were yielding their empire to truth and light and free inquiry. These great changes were silently going on in the new world, unobserved by the dynasties of the old. Before the ears of royalty were saluted by a single whisper of disaffection, or note of remonstrance, the revolution was deeply founded in the hearts and minds of the colonists. They were possessed of the great secret, that all political power must be derived from the people that, this is the only source of legitimate government, and this alone is obligatory. The principle of representation was understood and appreciated. Its benefits had been partially realized, in consequence of the incautious indulgence of the parent country."

  • Williams, Melancthon B. (Melancthon Brown), d. 1889. An Oration delivered at Springfield, N.J., on the fortieth anniversary of American independence, by Melancthon B. Williams. 15 pp.

  • Wilmer, William H. (William Holland), 1782-1827. A Sermon, delivered in St. Paul's Church, on the Fourth of July, 1813, to the Second Brigade of Alexandria militia at the request of the officers by Wm. H. Wilmer. 20 pp. 18 cm.

  • Wilson, James, 1760-1839. An Oration, delivered at Providence, in the First Congregational meeting-house, on the Fourth of July, 1804, by the Rev. James Wilson. 16 pp. 23 cm.

  • Wilson, Woodrow, President, U.S. Address At Independence Hall, 4 July 1914.
    "The most patriotic man, ladies and gentlemen, is sometimes the man who goes in the direction that he thinks right even when he sees half the world against him. It is the dictate of patriotism to sacrifice yourself if you think that that is the path of honor and of duty. Do not blame others if they do not agree with you. Do not die with bitterness in your heart because you did not convince the rest of the world, but die happy because you believe that you tried to serve your country by not selling your soul. Those were grim days, the days of 1776. Those gentlemen did not attach their names to the Declaration of Independence on this table expecting a holiday on the next day, and that 4th of July was not itself a holiday. They attached their signatures to that significant document knowing that if they failed it was certain that every one of them would hang for the failure. They were committing treason in the interest of the liberty of 3,000,000 people in America. All the rest of the world was against them and smiled with cynical incredulity at the audacious undertaking. Do you think that if they could see this great Nation now they would regret anything that they then did to draw the gaze of a hostile world upon them? Every idea must be started by somebody, and it is a lonely thing to start anything. Yet if it is in you, you must start it if you have a man's blood in you and if you love the country that you profess to be working for.
    "I am sometimes very much interested when I see gentlemen supposing that popularity is the way to success in America. The way to success in this great country, with its fair judgments, is to show that you are not afraid of anybody except God and his final verdict. If I did not believe that, I would not believe in democracy. If I did not believe that, I would not believe that people can govern themselves. If I did not believe that the moral judgment would be the last judgment, the final judgment, in the minds of men as well as the tribunal of God, I could not believe in popular government. But I do believe these things, and, therefore, I earnestly believe in the democracy not only of America but of every awakened people that wishes and intends to govern and control its own affairs."

  • Wilson, Woodrow, President, U.S. Address to the Diplomatic Corps, 4 July 1918. Delivered at Mount Vernon July 4, 1918
    "It is significant,--significant of their own character and purpose and of the influences they were setting afoot,--that Washington and his associates, like the barons at Runnymede, spoke and acted, not for a class, but for a people. It has been left for us to see to it that it shall be understood that they spoke and acted, not for a single people only, but for all mankind. They were thinking, not of themselves and of the material interests which centred in the little groups of landholders and merchants and men of affairs with whom they were accustomed to act, in Virginia and the colonies to the north and south of her, but of a people which wished to be done with classes and special interests and the authority of men whom they had not themselves chosen to rule over them. They entertained no private purpose, desired no peculiar privilege. They were consciously planning that men of every class should be free and America a place to which men out of every nation might resort who wished to share with them the rights and privileges of free men. And we take our cue from them,--do we not? We intend what they intended. We here in America believe our participation in this present war to be only the fruitage of what they planted. Our case differs from theirs only in this, that it is our inestimable privilege to concert with men out of every nation what shall make not only the liberties of America secure but the liberties of every other people as well."

  • Winslow, Hubbard, 1799-1864. The means of the perpetuity and prosperity of our republic: an Oration, delivered by request of the municipal authorities, of the city of Boston, ... Boston, John H. Eastburn, city printer, 1838. 50 pp. Also here. Review here.
    "We hence see that a civil government in which righteous laws reign, is one of the noblest gifts of God to man, and one of the grandest triumphs of human wisdom and greatness."
    ... "The opinion seems never to have been for a moment entertained by those, to whom we are indebted for our free institutions, that a people can govern and protect itself, without the ascendant influence and sanctions of acknowledged human accountability to God. Nor was religion with them a mere tool or means of civil government. It sustained the two fold relation of both object and means. They prized civil liberty, because it afforded them opportunity to serve God according to the dictates of their consciences; while they believed that the actual service of God was an essential means of sustaining civil liberty."

  • Winslow, John. An Oration, delivered at Plympton, on the Fourth of July, 1809, by John Winslow. 26 pp.

  • Winthrop, Robert C. (Robert Charles). Oration on the centennial anniversary of the Declaration of Independence: delivered in the Music Hall, at the request of the city government. Boston, 1876. 54 pp. Also here.
    "For, if that second century of self-government is to go on safely to its close, or is to go on safely and prosperously at all, there must be some renewal of that old spirit of subordination and obedience to Divine, as well as human, Laws, which has been our security in the past. There must be 'faith in something higher and better than ourselves. There must be a reverent acknowledgment of an Unseen, but All-seeing, All-controlling, Ruler of the Universe. His Word, His Day, His House, His Worship, must be sacred to our children, as they have been to their fathers; and His blessing must never fail to be invoked upon our land and upon our liberties. The patriot voice, which cried from the balcony of yonder Old State House, when the Declaration had been originally proclaimed, 'Stability and Perpetuity to American Independence,' did not fail to add, 'God save our American States.' I would prolong that ancestral prayer. And the last phrase to pass my lips at this hour, and to take its chance for remembrance or oblivion in years to come, as the conclusion of this Centennial Oration, and as the sum, and summing up, of all I can say to the present or the future, shall be: -- There is, there can be, no Independence of God: in Him, as a Nation, no less than in Him, as individuals, 'we live, and move, and have our being!' GOD SAVE OUR AMERICAN STATES!"

  • Woodbridge, Timothy, 1784-1862. An Oration delivered at Great Barrington in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America, by Timothy Woodridge. 17 pp.

  • Woodbury, Levi, 1789-1851. An Oration, pronounced at Lyndeborough, N.H., in commemoration of the independence of the United States of America, July 4, 1815, by Levi Woodbury. 18 pp.

  • Worthington, Erastus, 1779-1842. An Oration on the recent measures of the American government, pronounced at Dedham, July 4th, 1809 by Erastus Worthington. 23 pp.

  • Wright, N. Hill (Nathaniel Hill), 1787-1824. Ode written for the celebrarion [sic] of the Republican Young Men, July 4, 1808, by Nathaniel H. Wright. 1 sheet ([1] p.)


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  • Young, Joab, 1758-1816. An Oration, pronounced at the request of the Republican citizens of Falmouth, Maine, on the Fourth of July, 1805, being the twenty-ninth anniversary of American independence by Joab Young. 12 pp.
    These were 'times that tried men's souls.' Our Mother-Country, turning monster, forgot her child, and had no compassion for her own offspring; saying, they have neither discipline, arms, ammunition nor commanders, and will therefore fall an easy prey--But the all gracious finger of Heaven pointed to a WASHINGTON, to take the command, to discipline our warriors, and lead them to victory and glory.
    These proceedings, and their subsequent effects, produced that ever memorable DECLARATION, make twenty-nine years past, to commemorate which we are this day assembled--and may the Great Arbiter of all events grant that we may not forget or cease to realise, but perpetuate its glories, unstained by Despotism or Anarcy, to the latest posterity. The United States of America were then declared FREE and INDEPENDENT of any power on earth--they solemnly acknowledged GOD as their king, and adopted his holy word as their law. Then commenced a Scene of War, which while it degraded human nature on the one hand, announced the full-souled magnanimity of the then-feeble Americans on the other.


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