Classic Works of Apologetics - Thanksgiving Proclamations Classic Works of Apologetics Online


Thanksgiving Proclamations

This page is a presentation of Thanksgiving Proclamations in honor, deference and praise to God, in gratitude for His blessings upon America, and other countries as well. Included are sermons and discourses regarding the holiday.

Rutherford B. Hayes, 19th President of the United States: "I have the Thanksgiving Proclamations of twenty-seven States--all recognizing religion, nearly all the religion of the Bible, and several the Divinity of Christ. More are coming, doubtless. Our Legislature for many years has passed a joint resolution annually authorizing a thanksgiving and frequently in terms which recognized the religion of the Bible. The last Legislature omitted to do so by a mere accident this year, but in [the] Sixty-fifth volume Ohio Laws, page 306, passed one last year. If you wish to borrow my bundle of Thanksgiving Proclamations I will send them to you. All state institutions have religious exercises, some of them chaplains paid under state laws. The meetings of the two houses of the General Assembly are always opened with prayer in accordance, sometimes, with resolutions (passed unanimously usually), and sometimes by common consent. The inaugurations of governors are prefaced by religious exercises." --Diary and Letters of Rutherford B. Hayes. Volume 3, Chapter 27. Governor of Ohio -- First Term, 1868-1869. Columbus, Ohio, November 13, 1869, p. 72. Also here and here.


Historical Overview

  • Barton, David / Charles David, b. 1954. Thanksgiving in America. Posted November 2002.

  • Barton, David / Charles David, b. 1954. Celebrating Thanksgiving In America. Posted November 2008.

  • Belcher Foundation. "November Thanksgiving Thursday": Origins of Fourth Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day (includes Governor Jonathan Belcher's Proclamation for Day of Thanksgiving (1749)).
    Governor Belcher's first Thanksgiving Proclamation that established a Thursday in November as the Thanksgiving Day date was his Proclamation for Day of Thanksgiving printed in the November 2, 1730 issue of The New England Weekly Journal, clearly specifying that "THURSDAY the TWELFTH of NOVEMBER next" was to be "a day of Public THANKSGIVING throughout this Province." This Thanksgiving Proclamation specifically mentioned offering up prayer to God for "granting us a plentiful HARVEST", among other enumerated blessings. Thus, Thursday, November 12, 1730 was Governor Jonathan Belcher's First Thanksgiving Proclamation. It specifically mentioned a Thursday in November.

    The 1730 Thanksgiving Day Proclamation was issued at the beginning of Jonathan Belcher's governorship of the colonies of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which lasted from 1730 to 1741. As previously mentioned, Governor Belcher issued at least another Thanksgiving Day Proclamation in 1749, when he was governor of the colony of New Jersey. (Though he was officially chosen to be governor of New Jersey in 1746, he was on a trip to England at the time, and he didn't get to land on American shores again until 1747--hence the confusion that sometimes occurs about the beginning date of his New Jersey governorship. Since he was actually commissioned in 1746, however, the proper official beginning date for his New Jersey governorship is 1746. He died Governor of New Jersey in 1757.)

  • United States. House of Representatives. The Historian's Response. Office of the Historian. Robert V. Remini, Historian of the House.
    On 24 September 1789, 220 years ago, the House passed the conference report on the Bill of Rights, which included the text of what became the First Amendment. But what is not known, is that the House 220 years ago on the 25th of September, passed a resolution calling for a national day of Thanksgiving for the U.S. Constitution. On Friday 25 September 1789, a Joint Committee requested that the President of the United States "recommend to the People of the United States, a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed, by acknowledging, with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a Constitution of Government for their safety and happiness." This request for thanksgiving came the day after the House accepted the Senate's modifications on the proposed amendments to the Constitution and approximately six months after Congresses first session began on 4 March 1789. On 28 September 1789, the Senate concurred with the House and "agreed to the resolution desiring the President of the United States to recommend a day of general thanksgiving."

    President Washington heeded Congress's request and on Wednesday, 14 October 1789 the Massachusetts Sentinel published Washington's General Thanksgiving Proclamation. "While there were Thanksgiving observances in America both before and after Washington's Proclamation, this represents the first to be so designated by the new national government."

  • Hough, Franklin Benjamin, 1822-1885. Proclamations for Thanksgiving, issued by the Continental Congress: Pres't Washington, by the national and state governments on the Peace of 1815, and by the governors of New York since the introduction of the custom; with those of the governors of the several states in 1858. Munsell & Rowland, 1858. 183 pp. 28 cm. Also here and here.

    Whatever tends to strengthen the ties of kindred and friendship, or to promote offices of kindness and charity, claims the attention and favor of all good citizens; and among the very few usages which deserve the title of National Customs, our Thanksgiving festival may in this sense be ranked as first./ As such, its origin and history are worthy of inquiry, and as an act of Civil Authority, the Proclamation for its observance may be deemed entitled to a more permanent form of record than the casual chances of the periodical press.

    The in-gathering of the fruits of the earth, has from time immemorial, and among all nations, been a season of gladness; and with such as possessed definite views of their obligations to the Unseen Providence that governs the Universe, has been accompanied by such forms of devotion as were deemed most appropriate to express their gratitude for this bounty, and their dependence for its continuance. In like manner, special instances of national success, of preservation from impending calamities, or of relief from grievous afflictions, have been made the subjects of such form of Thanksgiving as the occasion might suggest, and calamities have been sought to be averted or removed by Public Fasting and Prayer. Among most civilized countries these occasions have been marked by public ordinances directing the time and manner of observance.

    We find at an early period of New England history, that special occasions of prosperity or calamity, were continually ascribed to the smiles or frowns of Providence, and often made the occasion of Public Thanksgiving or Fast; and the tone of religious sentiment which prevailed among the early Colonists, led in the infancy of their settlement, to the annual observance of each. The former was usually in autumn, and the latter in spring.

    ... At an early period in the Revolution, the Continental Congress adopted the custom of invoking the Divine Favor by Public Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer, and the days thus appointed were generally in the spring months. It always suspended its own sessions upon the days thus set apart, when the public exigencies would allow.

    ... The Journals of the Continental Congress contain eight several appointments of Thanksgiving days, and the resolutions expressing the wishes of Congress upon this subject, were in the form of recommendations to the Executive heads of the State governments, reciting in appropriate terms, the occasion which prompted the observance, and the favors which a Benign Providence had conferred upon them as a people. With one exception, Congress suspended business upon the days it had appointed for Thanksgiving.

    ... The official announcement of peace between the United States and Great Britain, was regarded by Congress and our State Legislature as an event demanding a public expression of gratitude to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, and at the joint suggestion of the Executive and Legislative authorities, it was unanimously decided to celebrate the happy event by a Solemn Thanksgiving.

    ... This custom is now observed in nearly every State and organized Territory in the Union.

  • Love, William DeLoss, 1851-1918. The Fast and Thanksgiving Days of New England. Boston; New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1895. vii, 607 pp.: ill., facsims.; 21 cm. Also
  • THANKSGIVING--Nov. 25, 1802. Boston Weekly Magazine (1802-1804), 1802, Vol. 1 Issue 5, pp. 20-20, 1/7 pp.


    Barbados

  • Barbados. By His Excellency Major-General Sir Evan John Murray MacGregor, baronet ... governor and commander-in-chief in and over the islands of Barbados, Saint Vincent, Grenada, Tobago, St. Lucia, and Trinidad, &c. &c. &c. A Proclamation. ... I do hereby, by and with the advice of Her Majesty's Privy Council, set apart the first day of August next, as a day of solemn thanksgiving and devout supplication to almighty God ... Given under my hand and seal this second day of July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty eight. Proclamation. 1838 July 2.


    Church of England

  • Adams, John, 1662-1720. A Sermon preach'd at the cathedral-church of St. Paul: before the right honourable Sir Samuel Garrard, Bar., Lord-Mayor of the city of London, and the Court of Aldermen, on Tuesday, Novemb. 22, 1709: being the day appointed by Her Majesty's Royal Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving / by J. Adams London: Printed for Henry Clements, at the Half-Moon in St. Paul's Church-yard, 1709. [2], 13, [1] p. (the last blank; 19 cm. (8vo)

  • Ashton, Thomas, 1716-1775. A Sermon preach'd in the collegiate-chapel at Eton, on Thursday the 9th day of October, 1746: Being the day appointed by Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the suppression of the late unnatural rebellion ... / By Thomas Ashton. London: printed for J. and R. Tonson and S. Draper, 1746.

  • Church of England. A Form of prayer and Thanksgiving to be used on Friday the eleventh of April being the fast-day appointed by the Kings Proclamation, to seek reconciliation with almighty God. London: Printed by John Bill, Thomas Newcomb, and Henry Hills ..., 1679. [7] pp

  • Cockburn, John. Two Sermons preach'd in the English Church at Amsterdam the one Decem. 5th 1703. Appointed by the states a day of publick prayer and Thanksgiving. The other on Decem. 9th. occasioned by the late storm. By John Cockburn D.D. Amsterdam, 1704.

  • Church of England. A Form of Thanksgiving, to be used throughout the cities of London and Westminster, and elsewhere within the bills of mortality, on Sunday the eighteenth day of this instant April; and in all other places throughout England and Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, on Sunday the ninth day of May next ensuing, immediately after The General Thanksgiving, both at Morning and Evening Prayer. By Her Majesties especial Command. London, 1708.

  • Church of England. A Form of prayer and Thanksgiving to Almighty God; to be used in all churches and chapels throughout England, the dominion of Wales, and town of Berwick upon Tweed, on Tuesday the twenty fifth day of April next, being the day appointed by Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for putting an end to the late bloody and expensive war, by the conclusion of a just and honourable peace. By His Majesty's special command. London: Printed by T. Baskett, and by the assigns of R. Baskett, 1749. 15 pp. 20 cm.

  • Church of England. Abstract of a form of prayer and thanksgiving to almighty God; to be used in all churches and chapels ... on Thursday the 29th of November instant, being the day appointed by Proclamation for a general thanksgiving to God; for vouchsafing such signal successes to His Majesty's arms, both by sea and land, particularly by the defeat of the French army in Canada, and the taking of Quebeck; and for most seasonably granting us at this time an uncommonly plentiful harvest." [London?], [1759].

  • Church of England. A form of prayer with Thanksgiving proper to be used in the churches throughout the province of New-York, on Thursday the twenty third day of October, being the day appointed, by Proclamation, for a general Thanksgiving, to Almighty God. New York: Printed and sold by W. Weyman ..., 1760. 8 pp.

  • Church of England. form of prayer and thanksgiving to Almighty God: to be used at morning and evening service, after the general thanksgiving, throughout the cities of London and Westminster, and elsewhere within the bills of mortality, on Sunday the twelfth of October, 1760; and in all churches and chapels throughout England, Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed, on the Sunday after the ministers thereof receive the same: on occasion of the late successes of His Majesty's arms in North-America, and the surrender of Montreal, and all Canada. London: printed by Thomas Baskett; and by the assigns of Robert Baskett, 1760. 4 pp.


    England and Wales

  • H. T. A Glorious victorie obtained by Sir William Waller, and Sir William Balfoure, against the Lord Hoptons forces, neere Alsford, on Fryday last March 29 beeing an exact relation of the whole manner of the fight ... wherein the Lord Hoptons forces were routed : with the names of severall commanders and officers of note, which were then taken prisoners / sent in a letter from an intelligent officer in the armie to his friend in London; with a true coppie of the Thanksgiving for the same, appointed to bee read in all churches about London on the Lords day, March 31. [London]: Printed for Thomas Bates, April 1, 1644. 8 p.

  • Anonymous. Considerations upon the Proclamation for the Thanksgiving in a letter to a friend. [London: s.n., 1692?] 20 pp.

  • England and Wales. Lord Protector (1653-1658: O. Cromwell) By the Lord Protector. A declaration of his Highness, setting apart Tuesday the 23. of this present May for a publique day of thanksgiving, for the peace concluded between this Commonwealth, and that of the United Provinces, and for the late seasonable rain. London: Printed by William du-Gard and Henry Hills, Printers to his Highness the Lord Protector, 1654. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II). By the King. A Proclamation for setting apart a day of solemn and Publick Thanksgiving [for the restoration] ... the twenty eight day of ... June ... Whitehal, the fifth day of June .. London: Printed by C. Barker and J. Bill, 1660. [2] l. 29 x 38 cm.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II). By the King. A Proclamation for setting apart a day of solemn and Publick Thanksgiving throughout the whole kingdom. London: Printed by Christopher Barker and John Bill, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1660. 1 sheet. Also here and here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II) Uniform title: [Proclamations. 1660-06-05]. By the King. A Proclamation for setting apart a day of solemn and Publick Thanksgiving throughout the whole kingdom. London: printed by Christopher Barker and John Bill, printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1660. 2 sheets (versos blank)

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II). A Proclamation for the observation of the nine and twentieth day of May instant, as a day of Publick Thanksgiving, according to the late act of Parliament for that purpose. London: Printed by the assigns of John Bill and Christopher Barker ..., 1661. 3 leaves. Also here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II). By the King a Proclamation for a Thanksgiving for the late victory by His Majesties naval forces. London: Printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, 1665. 1 broadside.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II). By the King: a Proclamation for a Thanksgiving for the late victory by His Majesties naval forces. London: Printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, 1665. 1 broadside.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II) Uniform title: [Proclamations. 1666-08-06]. By the King. A Proclamation for a Thanksgiving for the late victory by His Majesties naval forces, against the Dutch. London: printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, printers to the Kings most excellent Majesty, 1666. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1660-1685: Charles II). A Proclamation indicting a solemn and Publick Thanksgiving throughout the kingdom of Scotland: to be kept upon the ninth of September next, for His Majesties safe delivery from the late phanatical conspiracy against His Majesty, His Royal Highness, and government. Edinburgh: Printed by the heir of Andrew Anderson ... Re-printed at London: By George Croom ..., 1683. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1685-1688: James II). A Proclamation for a solemn and Publick Thanksgiving throughout the kingdom, for His Majesties late victories over the rebels. / James R. Edinburgh: Printed by the assigns of John Bill deceas'd, and by Henry Hills, and Thomas Newcomb, 1685. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1685-1688: James II). A Proclamation, for a Thanksgiving throughout the kingdom of Scotland, for the late defeat of the Kings enemies. Edinburgh: Printed by the heir of Andrew Anderson; Reprinted at London: By E. Mallet ..., 1685. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1685-1688: James II). A Proclamation, for an anniversary Thanksgiving, in commemoration of His Majesties happy birth-day, being the forteenth day of October, &c. / James R. Edinburgh: Printed by the heir of Andrew Anderson ..., 1685. 1 sheet. Also here and here

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1685-1688: James II). By the King, a Proclamation appointing a time of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer throughout the kingdom. London: Printed by Charles Bill, Henry Hills, and Thomas Newcomb ..., 1687. 1 sheet. 31 x 37 cm. Also By the King, a Proclamation appointing a time of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer throughout the kingdom.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1689-1694: William and Mary). By the King and Queen, a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. London: Printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd ..., MDCXCI [1691] 1 broadside. Also here and here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1689-1694: William and Mary). By the King and Queen, a Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving / William R. London: Printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb ..., 1692. 1 sheet. Also here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1689-1694: William and Mary). By the King and Queen, a Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving / William R. London: Printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb ..., 1693. 1 sheet. Also here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1689-1694: William and Mary). By the King and Queen, a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. London: Printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb ..., 1694. 1 broadside.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1694-1702: William III). By the King, a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. London: Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd ..., 1695/6. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Lords Justices. By the Lords Justices, a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. London: Printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, 1695. 1 broadside.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1694-1702: William III). By the King, a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. London: Printed by Charles Bill and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, 1697. 1 broadside. Also here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1694-1702: William III). By the King, a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. London: Printed by Charles Bill and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, 1697. 1 broadside.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1702-1714: Anne). By the Queen, a proclamation, for a publick thanksgiving. London: 1702. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1702-1714: Anne). By the Queen, a proclamation, for a publick thanksgiving. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd, 1706. 1 sheet. Also here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1702-1714: Anne). By the Queen, a proclamation, for a publick thanksgiving. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd, 1707. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1702-1714: Anne). By the Queen, a proclamation, for a publick thanksgiving. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; printers to the Queens most excellent Majesty, 1708. 1 sheet.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1702-1714: Anne). By the Queen, a proclamation, for a publick thanksgiving. London: printed by the assigns of Thomas Newcomb, and Henry Hills, deceas'd, 1710. 1 sheet. Also here.

  • England and Wales. Sovereign (1702-1714: Anne). By the Queen, a proclamation, for a publick thanksgiving. London: printed by John Baskett, and by the assigns of Thomas Newcomb, and Henry Hills, deceas'd, 1713. 1 sheet. Also here.


    Great Britain

  • Great Britain. Sovereign (1714-1727: George I). By the King. A Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving [in England for His Majesty's peaceable possession of the throne of Great Britain, etc. 6 Dec. 1714]. London: J. Baskett, etc, 1714. 1 broadside. Also here.

  • Great Britain. Sovereign (1714-1727: George I). By the King. A Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving. To be held in Scotland on Thursday 7th June to give thanks for the suppression of the Jacobite Rebellion. Edinburgh: Printed by James Watson, one of the printers to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, 1716. 1 broadside. Also here.


    Ireland

  • Cromwell, Oliver, 1599-1658. A letter from the Lord Generall Cromwell to the Parliament of England, concerning his proceedings with their army in Scotland and the late victory God hath given them over the Scottish Army there together with an act of Parliament for publique Thanksgiving in England thereupon: and a Proclamation of the deputy generall of Ireland for a further day of publique Thanksgiving in relation to the same throughout Ireland, on Thursday the seventh of November in this present yeare, 1650. Printed at Corcke: [s.n.], 1650. 25 pp.

  • Ireland. Lord Deputy. A Proclamation for a Thanksgiving for the late victory by His Majesties naval forces / by the Lord Deputy and Council, Ossory. Dublin: Printed by John Crook ... and are to be sold by Samuel Dancer ..., 1665. 1 broadside.


    Great Britain, Sermons

  • Agutter, William. Deliverance from enemies, a ground for Thanksgiving. A Sermon, preached on the day of general Thanksgiving, December 19th, 1797, in the chapel of ... . London, 1798. 18 pp.

  • Arrowsmith, Edward. A Sermon preach'd at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, before the Right Honourable the Lord-Mayor, the aldermen, and citizens of London, on Friday, May 29, 1724. Being the Anniversary Day of Thanksgiving for the Restoration. By Edward Arrowsmith, M. A. and Rector of St. Olave's, Hart-Street. London, MDCCXXIV. [1724].

  • Atterbury, Lewis. A Sermon preach'd at Whitehall, August the 23d, 1705. being the day appointed for a publick Thanksgiving for the late glorious success of Her Majesty's arms, and those of her allies, under the command of John Duke of Marlborough. By Lewis Atterbury, L. L. D. And One of the Six Preaching Chaplains at Whitehall. London, 1705.

  • Baker, Samuel. A Thanksgiving Sermon on Deuter XXVIII. part of verse 7th. Occasion'd by the late signal victory over the French near Mons, on Septemb. 11th. N.S. and the other remarkable successes of this present year 1709. By Samuel Baker. Preach'd at Winchester, and Publish'd at the request of many of the Hearers. London, [1710].

  • Bear, William. The Blessing of peace. Set forth in a Sermon, preached on Tuesday July the 7th, 1713. Being the Day appointed for a publick Thanksgiving, For the Conclusion of a Just and Honourable Peace, between Her Most Excellent Majesty the Queen of Great-Britain, and the French King. By W. Bear, Vicar of Abbotsham, Devon. Exon, 1713.

  • Beare, Nicholas. A Sermon preach'd, in the Parish-Church of St. Botolph Aldersgate, on the last day of December. Being the day appointed for a publick Thanksgiving. By Nicholas Beare, M.A. and for sometime curate there. London, 1707.

  • Bennet, William. The Divine conduct reviewed. A Sermon preached in the Meeting-House, on the Pavement, Moorfields, July 29, 1784; being a day of general Thanksgiving. By William Bennet. Published by desire of the church and congregation. London, M.DCC.LXXXIV. [1784].

  • Blennerhaysett, Thomas. Plus quam speravimus: or; the happy surprize. A Sermon preach'd at Patching, in Sussex, January the 20th, 1714/15. being the day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for bringing His Majesty to a peacable and quiet possession of the throne; and disappointing thereby the design s of the Pretender, and all his abettors and adherents. By Thomas Blennerhaysett, Rector of Patching; And Chaplain to the Right Honourable Lionel, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex. London, MDCCXV. [1715].

  • Booth, John, Curate of Kirkby Malzeard. A Sermon, preached at the Chapel of Wibsey, on the twenty-ninth of November, 1798, being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving. By the Rev. J. Booth, Officiating Minister of the said Chapel. Huddersfield, [1799?].

  • Buckner, John. A Sermon, preached at the abbey church of St. Peter, Westminster, before the Lords spiritual and temporal, on Thursday, Nov. 29, 1798, being the day appointed for a public Thanksgiving. By John, Lord Bishop of Chichester. London, M.DCC.XCVIII. [1798].

  • Burnaby, Andrew. A Sermon preached in Greenwich church, on Thursday, April 23d, 1789; the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving on account of His Majesty's happy recovery ; and Printed at the general Desire of the Parishioners. By the Rev. Andrew Burnaby, D.D. Archdeacon of Leicester, and Vicar of Greenwich. London, M,DCC,LXXXIX. [1789].

  • Burnaby, Andrew. A Sermon preached in Greenwich church, on Thursday, July 29, 1784; the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving: and printed at the desire of several of the most respectable inhabitants of the place. By the Rev. Andrew Burnaby, D.D. vicar of Greenwich. London, M.DCC.LXXXIV. [1784].

  • Burroughs, Joseph. A Thanksgiving Sermon, preach'd November 5. 1712. At Mr. Piggott's meeting-house in Little Wildstreet. By Joseph Burroughs. London, M.DCC.XIII. [1713].

  • Conway, George, of Wokingham. A Sermon preach'd at Ockingham, February the 17th 1708/9. Being the day appointed by authority for a publick Thanksgiving for the great and glorious successes of the last year. By G. C. London, 1709.

  • Cornish, Joseph. The Miseries of war, and the hope of final and universal peace, set forth in a Thanksgiving Sermon, preached at Colyton, in the county of Devon, July 29th, 1784, by Joseph Cornish. Published by Request. Taunton, [1784?].

  • Cowper, Charles. A Sermon preached at the Cathedral Church of York, on Thursday, May 5, 1763, being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for putting an end to the late bloody and expensive war, by the Conclusion of a Peace. By Charles Cowper, A. M. Canon Residentiary of the said Church. York, [1763].

  • Cummings, George. The Good of government. A Sermon, preached in St. Margaret-Patton's Church in Rude-Lane, London, on Tuesday, July 7, 1713. Being the day appointed by Her Majesty for a general Thanksgiving for the peace. By G.C. A.M. London, 1713.

  • Davidson, Robert, Rector of Hayes, Kent. Brit. Ann. 1a. A Sermon Preach'd on the Thanksgiving-Day, for the Happy Union of Great Britain. Under Her Sacred Majesty Queen Anne, May the 1st, 1707. By Robert Davidson, Rector of Hayes in Kent. London, MDCCVII. [1707].

  • De Veil, John. National blessings, a ground for Thanksgiving. A Sermon, preached on the day of General Thanksgiving, November, 29th, 1798, in the Parish-Church of Edgware. By the Reverend John De, Veil Vicar of Aldenham, in Hertfordshire, Chaplain to the Marquis of Abercorn, and one of his Majesty's Justices of the peace for the County of Middlesex. London, 1798.

  • Dent, Giles. A Thanksgiving Sermon preach'd on the first day of May, 1707. on occasion of the happy union between England and Scotland. By Giles Dent. London, 1707.

  • Deverell, Mary. Sermons on various subjects. By Mary Deverell, Gloucestershire. The second edition, revised and enlarged by the author. With an additional Discourse on the Duty of Thanksgiving. London, MDCCLXXVI. [1776].

  • Dickens, Charles. A Thanksgiving Sermon preached to his people 29 July, 1784, by Charles Dickens, LL.D. Vicar of Hemingford Grey, Huntingdonshire, from these Words, - the Streets of the City Shall be Full of Boys and Girls, Playing in the Streets Thereof. (zechariah viii. 5.) and Inscribed to her Grace, the Duchess of Argyll. Cambridge, MDCCLXXXIV. [1784].

  • Downes, John. A Sermon preach'd at the parish church of Painswick, in the county of Gloucester. On January 20th, Being the Day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God for bringing His Majesty to a peaceable and quiet Possession of the Throne. By John Downes, M. A. late Fellow of Pembroke College in Oxford, and Vicar of Painswick in Gloucester-Shire. London, 1715.

  • Ellis, W. (William). The Due method of keeping the Sabbath, and its reward. A Sermon, preached at the parish church of Stroud, Glocestershire, on the day of Thanksgiving. July 29, 1784. By the Rev. W. Ellis, curate of Stroud, and Chaplain to the right Hon. Lord Ducie. The profits of this Sermon are appropriated to the support of the Sunday schools established in the Parish of Stroud. To which are annexed, Rules for the management of the abovementioned schools. Glocester, M.DCC.LXXXIV. [1784].

  • Ely, Thomas. Israel's guardian: a Thanksgiving-Sermon preach'd November 5, 1714. In commemoration of the deliverance of this nation from the Gun-Powder Plot; and the late Glorious Revolution in 1688. Whereto is added, The Happy Accession of our Present Sovereign King George, to the Throne of Great Britain. By T. Ely. Publish'd at the Request of many that heard it. The second edition. London, 1714.

  • Ely, Thomas. A sermon preach'd at Goodman's-Fields, November 5. 1711. being the day appointed ... for an anniversary thanksgiving, for the happy discovery of the ... intended massacre by gun-powder. And also for the happy arrival of ... King William. London: printed by B. Mills, and sold by J. Baker; and Jos. Marshall, 1712. 28 pp.

  • Evans, John, 1680-1730. The being and benefits of divine providence, vindicated and asserted, in a sermon preached on Septemb. 7. being the day of publick thanksgiving: for the glorious victory over the French ... obtain'd at Bleinheim in Germany; on Wednesday, Aug. 2. ... By John Evans, .. London: printed for, and sold by S. Crouch, 1704. [2], 30 pp.

  • Fiddes, Richard, 1671-1725. A sermon preached on the Thanksgiving day: December, 3d. 1702. For the signal successes vouchsafed to her Majesties forces to sea and land: ... By Richard Fiddes, .. York: printed by John White, for Francis Hildyard, 1703. [2], 30 pp.

  • Fisher, William. A Sermon preach'd to a congregation of Protestant dissenters at Deal in Kent, June the 7th. 1716. Being the day of publick Thanksgiving to almighty God, for the suppression of the late unnatural rebellion. By William Fisher. The second edition. London, 1716.

  • Ford, Randolph. The Duty of rejoycing. Recommended in a Sermon: preach'd at the Chappel of Lincoln's-Inn, on June the 7th 1716. Being the day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for the success with which he has been pleas'd to crown His Majesties arms, in the speedy suppression of the late unnatural rebellion. By Randolph Ford, curate and lecturer of St. Mart Le Bone, in the county of Middlesex, and chaplain to the Rt. Hon. John Earl of Sutherland, lieutenant general of His Majesties forces. The second edition. London, MDCCXVI. [1716].

  • Freke, Thomas. Union, the strength of a people. Considered in a Sermon, Preach'd in Bartholomew-Close, On May the First, 1707. Being the Day appointed by Her Majesty, for a General Thanksgiving for the Happy Union of the Two Kingdoms of England and Scotland, in Great Britain. By Thomas Freke. London, 1707.

  • Goddard, Peter Stephen. A Sermon preached November 29, 1759. Being the day of public Thanksgiving, at Fornham All-Saints. And on the Wednesday following at the lecture at St. James's in St. Edmond's Bury. By Peter Stephen Goddard, M. A. Rector of Fornham All-Saints, with Westley, in the County of Suffolk: Chaplain to the Lord Bishop of Norwich; and late Fellow of Clare-Hall, in Cambridge. Bury St. Edmunds, 1760.

  • Goldwin, William. A Thanksgiving Sermon, preached on the 31st of Decemb. 1706. at Newnham in Hertfordshire. By William Goldwin, Batchelor of Arts, and Fellow of King's Colledge in Cambridge. London, MDCCVII. [1707].

  • Good, Thomas. The Blessedness of peacemakers. A Sermon Preach'd at the Parish-Church of Astley in the County of Worcester, On Tuesday, July 7th, 1713. Being the Day of Publick Thanksgiving for the Conclusion of a Just and Honourable peace between Her most Excellent Majesty the Queen of Great-Britain, and His most Christian Majesty the French king. By Thomas Good, A. M. Rector of the said Church. The second edition. Worcester, 1713.

  • Goode, William. Mercies in judgment: a Sermon, preached on the day of general Thanksgiving, December 19, 1797, in The Parish Church of St. Andrew, Wardrobe, and St. Ann, Black Friers, London, By the Reverend William Goode, A. M. Rector of the said Church, and Lecturer of St. John's Wappin[g]. London, 1797.

  • Grinfield, Thomas. The Union of prayer and praise, exemplified; in a Discourse, preached on Thursday, November 29, 1798. Being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving. At the Brethren's Chapel, in Bristol. By the Rev. T. Grinfield. Bristol, [1798?].

  • Hardinge, G. (Gideon). Victory and success from God alone. A Sermon preach'd at Kingston upon Thames, on Tuesday, November the 22d. 1709. Being the day appointed for a publick Thanksgiving, &c. By G. Hardinge, A.M. vicar of Kingston. Publish'd at the request of the auditors. London, 1710.

  • Hewlett, John. The Duty of Thanksgiving. A Sermon, preached at the foundling-hospital December 19, 1797. Being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving. By the Rev. John Hewlett, ... [London], 1798.

  • Hitchin, Edward. A Sermon preached at the new meeting, in White-Row Spital-Fields, on Thursday 29 November 1759. Being the day appointed by His Majesty for a general Thanksgiving. By Edward Hitchin. London, [1759?].

  • Jefferson, Jacob. The Blessing of peace and the means of preserving it. A Sermon preached before the University of Oxford, at St. Mary's, on Thursday, May 5. M.DCC.LXIII. Being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the peace. By Jacob Jefferson, ... Published at the request of the Vice-Chancellor and heads of houses. Oxford, 1763.

  • Jobson, Abraham. The Divine government considered as the hope of Britons, in a Thanksgiving Sermon preached on Tuesday, December 19, 1797, at March in the Isle of Ely; And Published At the Request of the Congregation. By Abraham Jobson, M. A. And formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. Cambridge, M.DCC.XCVII. [1797].

  • Jones, Da. (David). The Inhumanity of popery. A Sermon preached at the cathedral-church in Hereford, on the fifth of November, 1716. Being The Anniversary Thanksgiving, for that Happy Deliverance of the King and the Three Estates of England, from the most Traiterous and Bloody intended Massacre, by the Popish Gun-Powder-Plot. By Da. Jones, A. M. Rector of Stretton, near Hereford, and Chaplain to the Right Honourable John Earl Exeter. Published at the Request of the Auditors. London, 1717.

  • Keate, William. A Sermon, preached upon the occasion, of the general Thanksgiving, for the late peace, July 29th. 1784. By the Rev. William Keate, M. A. Formerly Fellow of King's College. Cambridge, and Rector of Piddle-Hinton, Dorsetshire. Bath, M,DCC,LXXXIV. [1784].

  • Kennicott, Benjamin. The Duty of Thanksgiving for peace in general, And the reasonableness of Thanksgiving for our present peace. A Sermon Preach'd at St. Martin's in Oxford, before the Mayor and Corporation, On Tuesday, April 25, 1749. Being the Day of Thanksgiving for the General Peace. By Benjamin Kennicott, Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. London, M.DCC.XLIX. [1749].

  • Lancaster, Thomas, curate of Feltham. The Christian Duty of Thanksgiving. A Sermon, preached at Hanworth in the county of Middlesex, on Thursday, April 23, 1789, being the day appointed for a solemn Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for His Majesty's happy recovery. By Thomas Lancaster, Curate of Feltham, and Master of an Academy at Parson's Green, Middlesex. London, [1789].

  • Lloyd, David. England's privileges: a Thanksgiving Sermon, preached in the diocese of Hereford, on Tuesday, December 19, 1797. By the Rev. D. Lloyd, Vicar of llanbister, Radnorshire. Hereford, 1797.

  • Marshall, Nathaniel. A Sermon preach'd at the new chapel in Ormond-Street, upon Thursday, May the first, 1707, Being The Day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the Union of the Two Kingdoms of England and Scotland. And at the parish of St. Mary Aldermanbury the Sunday following. Publish'd at the Request of several in each Audience. By N. Marshall, L. L. B. Vicar of St. Pancras, and Lecturer of Aldermanbury. London, 1707.

  • Mavor, William Fordyce. The Duty of Thanksgiving for national blessings; a Sermon, preached on Tuesday, December 19, 1797, being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving. By William Mavor, LL.D. Vicar of Hurley, Berks, and Chaplain to the Right Honourable the Earl of Dumfries. Oxford, 1798.

  • Mayo, Daniel, 1672?-1733. Meetness for heavenly glory a just reason for thanksgiving unto God. A funeral sermon occasion'd by the much lamented death of Mrs. Mary Dolins, ... with a brief account of her exemplary character. By Daniel Mayo, M.A. London: printed for Andrew Bell, 1720. 42 pp.

  • Naylor, Quintus. God to be prais'd, and our vows to be perform'd. A Thanksgiving Sermon on account of our preservation from the plague, preach'd at Rotherhith, April 25, l723. Publish'd at the request of the minister there, and of those that heard it. By Q. Naylor. London, M.DCC.XXIII. [1713].

  • Robertson, John. Britain the chosen nation, A Thanksgiving Sermon, preached, November 5th, 1788, By John Robertson, A.M. minister of Kilmarnock. Published by his hearers. Kilmarnock, M,DCC,LXXXVIII. [1788].

  • Scougal, Henry. The Duty and pleasure of praise and Thanksgiving. By Henry Scougal, A. M. Author of a Book intitled, The Life of God in the Soul of Man. The sixth edition. London, [1795].

  • Stead, William. A Sermon preached in the parish church of Reigate in Surry, on Thursday, the 5th of May, 1763. Being the Day Appointed for a General Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for putting an end to the late Bloody and Expensive War. By William Stead, M. A. Vicar of Reigate in Surry, and Chaplain to her Grace, Charlotte, Duchess Dowager of Somerset. London, MDCCLXIII. [1763].

  • Tayler, Thomas. A Sermon preached at the meeting-house in Carter-Lane, on Thursday, November 29, 1798; being the day appointed for a national Thanksgiving. By Thomas Tayler. London, 1798.

  • Taylor, Christopher. A Thanksgiving-Sermon, preach'd on the first day of May, 1707. On occasion of the happy union between England and Scotland. By Chr. Taylor. London, 1707.

  • Thomas, John. A Sermon preached at the Parish-Church of Blechingley in Survey, on Tuesday April 25th, 1749. Being the day appointed by His Majesty for a general Thanksgiving, on account of the peace. By John Thomas, L.L.D. rector of Blechingley, and chaplain in Ordinary to His Majesty. London, M.DCC.XLIX. [1749].

  • A Vindication of liberty of conscience; of the toleration of Protestant Dissenters; and of the present happy establishment: in remarks on Dr. Middleton's Sermon preached before the Lord-Mayor and Aldermen Of London, at St. Paul's, on May the 29th, 1730. London, Printed in the Year MDCCXXXIV. [1734].

  • Wright, S. (Samuel). The Love of one another, the great Duty of Christians. Considered in two Sermons; the one preached on the fifth of November, the other on the day of Thanksgiving, the 7th of November, 1710. Wherein due regard is had to the temper and behaviour of the papists; as also to the true interest of Protestants in observing of this Duty. By S. Wright. The second edition. London, 1710.


    Ireland, Sermons

  • Beresford, William. A Thanksgiving Sermon on the happy recovery of His Majesty from his late indisposition. Preached by command of His Excelleny the Lord Lieutenant, by the by the Hon. and Right Rev. Dr. Wm. Beresford, lord bishop of Ossary, in the Cathedral of Christ-Church, on the 23d of April, before His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant, and both Houses of Parliament. Printed by command of His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant. Dublin, 1789.

  • Delap, Samuel. The Deliverance of Great Britain and Ireland from popery, slavery and the pretender. A Sermon preach'd on Thursday the 9th of October, 1746. Being the Thanksgiving Day for our deliverance from the late wicked and unnatural rebellion. By Samuel Delap, A.M. dissenting minister at Letterkenny. Dublin, MDCCXLVI. [1746].

  • Porter, James. Wind and weather. A Sermon on the late providential storm which dispersed the French fleet off Bantry Bay. Preached to the Congregation of Gray-Abbey on Thursday the 16th February, being the Fast Day Appointed by Government for Thanksgiving. By the Rev. James Porter. Belfast, 1797.


    Jamaica, Sermons

  • Castelfranc, Gideon. A Sermon, preached at the parish church of St. Andrew, on Friday the second of September, 1763, being the day appointed by His Excellency the Governor, for a general Thanksgiving, on account of the peace. By Gideon Castelfranc, A. M. Rector of the said Parish. Kingston, Jamaica, 1763.


    Scotland

  • Scotland. Sovereign (1685-1688: James VII). A Proclamation, for an anniversary Thanksgiving, in commemoration of his Majesties happy birth-day, being the fourteenth day of October, &c. Edinburgh: printed by the Heir of Andrew Anderson, Printer to His most Sacred Majesty, Anno DOM. 1685. 1 sheet.

  • Scotland. Convention of Estates. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. Edinburgh April 26. 1689. London: printed by G. Croom, at the Blue-Ball in Thames-street near Baynard's-Castle, 1689. 1 sheet. Also here and here.

  • Scotland. Sovereign (1760-1820: George III). By the King. A Proclamation for a Public Thanksgiving. Published in The New-York Herald. June 9, 1802.


    Scotland, Sermons

  • Bruce, Archibald. Annus secularis; or the British jubilee: or a review of the act of the General Assembly, appointing the 5th of November 1788, as an anniversary-Thanksgiving, in commemoration of the revolution in 1688; Wherein Also. The Doctrine and History; the Origin, Progress, and Tendency of Religious Festivals, in Ancient and Modern Times, both in a Religious and Moral View, are Particularly Considered. By Calvinianus Presbyter. Edinburgh, M,DCC,LXXXVIII. [1788].

  • Duff, William. National prosperity, the consequence of national virtue; and national ruin, the effect of national wickedness: a Sermon, ON Ezra IX. 13. delivered at Foveran, July IX. MDCCLXXXIV. To which is subjoined, an address to the proprietors of land in Scotland: Recommending To Their Serious Attention And Practice, Religion And Public Spirit, Temperance And Private Economy; Benificence To The Poor, And Indulgence To Their Tenants. By William Duff, M.A. Aberdeen, MDCCLXXXV. [1785].

  • Erskine, Ralph. The Promising God, a performing God. A Sermon, on Gen. xxviii. 15. preached On a Thanksgiving-Day, immediately after the celebration of the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, at Abbot's Hall, Oct. 22d, 1733. By the late Reverend Mr. Ralph Erskine, Minister of the Gospel at Dunfermline. The fifth edition. Glasgow, MDCCLXXVIII. [1778].



    Colorado

  • Proclamation of a day of thanksgiving by the govornor of Colorado Territory. Whereas, gratitude is one of the noblest and purest emotions of the human heart ... I call upon all of the people of Colorado Territory, without distinction, to observe the twenty-sixth day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Done at the executive rooms, in Denver, this, the twenty-eighth day of October, A.D. 1863. [Proclamation. 1863 Oct. 28]


    Connecticut

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1708-1724: Saltonstall). By the Honourable, Gurdon Saltonstall, Esq; governour of his majesty's colony of Connecticut in New-England. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Wednesday, the eighth day of November next ... Given in New-Haven, the fourteenth day of October, Anno Domini 1721. New-London [Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to His Honour the governour and company, 1721. Also here.
    ALTHOUGH, Considering the Judgments of GOD, which are on the Earth, in the great Distress & Desolation brought upon many Nations, both by WAR and PESTILENCE.
    And Considering also particularly, the awful Tokens of GOD's Righteous Anger against us, Especially, in the Contagious SICKNESS which has been in divers Places of the Land, and in the continued RAINS, by which great Losses have been sustained, It becomes Us to be deeply Humbled before the LORD.
    IT is Nevertheless our Duty to Acknowledge the many Instances of Divine Goodness, which the LORD whose Ways, are not as Ours, has Graciously vouchtaled Us and which are never to be forgotten...........Namely,
    THE Smiles of Providence on the BRITISH Empire, and particularly, On Our Sovereign Lord the KING, in the Prosperity of His Life and Reign: On Their Royal Highnesles the PRINCE and PRINCESS of Wales, and and on all the Branches of the ROYAL FAMILY, not only, in Their Happy Increase, by the BIRTH of the Royal Prince WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, but, also, in the Lives of Others of Them when in Hazard by Sickness, have been Mercifully Spared.
    THE PEACE which has been Continued, and Confirmed to Our Nation, after so many Endeavours to interrupt It.
    THE Preservation of the British Dominions from the Raging PESTILENCE, which has laid so many Places waste, within their View, and Neighbourhood.
    THE General HEALTH that has been Enjoyed in the Land, notwithstanding, The SMALLPOX has prevailed so much, in the Principal Place of our Neighbouring Province.
    THE Preservation of Our COLONY, in so great a Measure from that Contagious Sickness, when We have been in great Danger of It; The Continuance of Our Privileges both Civil and Sacred; The Peace which we have Enjoyed: And the good Supply of the Fruits of the Earth, which the present Year has been Crowned with.
    WHICH are, (All of them) Blessings from the LORD, whose Mercy therein We ought to Celebrate with great THANKFULNESS.
    I have therefore thought fit, with the Abbice and Consent of the Council, and at the Desire of the Representatives, to Appoint, and do hereby Appoint Wednesday, the Eight Day of November next, to be Observed as a Day of publick THANKGIVING throughout the Colony. Exhorting all both Ministers & People, with Unseigned Devotion, to Bless the Name of the LORD, and praise him for all the Wonders of his Goodness; And, to Beg that the mercy which we Adore, may in all the needful Instances thereof be manifested to Us.
    And all Service Labours on the said Day is hereby strictly prohibited.
    Given in New-Haven, the Fourteenth Day of October, Anno Domini 1721, In the Eight year of the Reign of Our Sovereign lord GEORGE, by the Grace of GOD of Great Britain, France and Ireland, KING, Defender of the Faith, &c.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1741-1750: Law). By the Honourable Jonathan Law, Esq; governour ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eighth day of November next ... Given under my hand at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, this fifteenth day of October 1744. N. London [New London, Conn.]: Printed by T. Green, printer to the governour and Company, 1744. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 38 x 29 cm.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1741-1750: Law). By the Honourable Jonathan Law Esq; governour ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventh day of November next ... Given under my hand at the Council-chamber at New-Haven, this sixteenth day of October, Anno Domini, 1745 N. London [New London, Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the governour and company, 1745. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1741-1750: Law). By the Honourable Jonathan Law Esq; governour ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the tenth day of November next ... Given under my hand at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, this nineteenth day of October ... 1748. [New London, Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, at his office in New-London, October 24, 1748, printer to the governor and Company in the colony of Connecticut, [1748]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1741-1750: Law). By the Honourable Jonathan Law Esq; governour ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the ninth day of November next ... Given under my hand at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, this seventeenth day of October ... 1749. New-London [Conn.]: October the 20th, 1749. Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the governour and Company of the colony abovesaid, [1749]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch, Esq; Governor of His Majesty's Colony of Connecticut in New-England, in America A Proclamation for a day of public fasting & prayer ....New-London March the 8th 1756, Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the Governor and company of the Colony abovesaid. [1756]. New London, 1756. 1 sheet; 40 x 32 cm.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the 15th day of November next, to be observed ... as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, the 30th day of October ... 1759. [New-Haven]: Printed by James Parker, and Company, at the Post-Office in New-Haven, October thirty-first, 1759. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the sixth day of March next ... Given under my hand at Fairfield, the twentieth day of February ... 1760. New-Haven: Printed by James Parker, and Company at the Post-Office, February twenty-first, 1760. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. Whereas it hath pleased the Lord our God, to continue his smiles on the British arms ... particularly by the taking of Montreal ... Thursday, the twenty-third day of this instant, October, to be kept ... as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber, in New-Haven, the thirteenth day of October ... 1760. [New Haven: Printed by James Parker, and Company, 1760]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November next, to be kept ... as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New-Haven, the thirty first day of October ... 1760. New-London [Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the colony of Connecticut, 1760. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honorable Thomas Fitch Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... that a Publick Thanksgiving, be observed: ... on the twenty-sixth day of November, next ... Given under my hand at the Council-chamber, in New-Haven, the twenty-seventh day of October ... 1761. [New Haven: Printed by James Parker, and Company, 1761]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honorable Thomas Fitch, Esq. governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the eighteenth day of instant November, to be religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, the first day of November ... 1762. [New Haven: Printed by James Parker, and Company, 1762]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honorable Thomas Fitch, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. [New Haven: Printed by James Parker, and Company, 1763]. 1 sheet. Also here
    As every Favor of Heaven, demands our sincere and cordial Gratitude; so, do more general and national Salvations justly challenge our most public and solemn Celebration of the Praise and Glory of God, the gracious Giver of all Mercies.
    I have therefore thought fit, by, and with the Advice of the Council, and at the Desire of the Representatives, in General Court assembled, to appoint, and do hereby appoint, Thursday, the Seventeenth Day of November next, to be observed as a Day of publick Thanksgiving throughout this Colony. Earnestly exhorting all his Majesty's Subjects, both Ministers and People, with becoming Devotion, religiously to observe the same, with publick Solemnity; rendering Praise to Almighty God, the Author of all our Blessings, and of all our Salvation, thro' the Riches of his Mercy in Jesus Christ.
    ... That GOD would be pleased to establish the Throne of the King in Righteousness; make His Reign long and prosperous, and over-rule and order all the important Affairs of our Nation in Mercy; that the Peace may remain inviolate: The Rage and Cruelty of the Heathen be restrained, and they be dispoed to Peace; and that the Gospel of Peace be sent and received among them, to general and saving Effect: That our large Experienceof the Divine Goodness may lead us to unfeigned Repentance and Reformation. That this Colony, in all its important Interests, may share in the Protections of Heaven. And, that the Means of Grace and Education be happily succeeded, both here, and throughout the World, till the Earth be filled with the Glory of the Lord.
    And all servile Labour is forbidden on said Day.
    Given under my hand at the Council-chamber, in New-Haven, this 27th day of October, in the IVth Year of the Reign of Our Sovereign Lord George the Illd, by the Grace of GOD, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, &c. Annoque Domini,1763.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the fifteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, at the Council-chamber, in New-Haven, the 25th day of October ... 1764. [New Haven: Printed by Benjamin Mecom, 1764]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honourable Thomas Fitch, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the fourteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council-chamber at New-Haven, the twenty-second day of October ... 1765. New Haven: Printed by Benjamin Mecom, at the post-office, [1765]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1754-1766: Fitch). By the Honorable Thomas Fitch, Esq; Governor of His Majesty's English Colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America. A Proclamation for a day of public fasting and prayer... Wednesday the sixteenth day of April next ... Tho's Fitch. God save the king. New-London: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to his Honour the Governor, and company, 1766. New London, 1766. 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1766-1769: Pitkin). By the Honorable William Pitkin, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twentieth day of November next, to be observed ... as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber at New-Haven, the 27th day of October ... 1766. New-Haven: Printed by Samuel Green, 1766. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1766-1769: Pitkin). By the Honorable William Pitkin, Esq; governor of His Majesty's English colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America. A Proclamation. ... I ... do hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of this instant, June, to be religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this colony ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in Hartford, the twelfth day of June ... 1766. [Hartford]: Printed by Thomas Green, at the Heart and Crown, opposite the State-House, in Hartford, [1766]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1766-1769: Pitkin). By the Honourable William Pitkin, Esq. governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the ninteenth [sic] day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council-chamber, in New-Haven, the 17th day of October ... 1767. [New Haven: Printed by Samuel Green, 1767]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1766-1769: Pitkin). By the Honorable William Pitkin, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the seventeenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber in New-Haven, the 24th day of October ... 1768. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas & Samuel Green, [1768]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-third day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber in New-Haven, the 30th day of October ... 1769. [Hartford: Printed by Green and Watson, 1769]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the fifteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber at New-Haven, the 12th day of October ... 1770. [New Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, 1770]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 44 x 27 cm.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esq; governor of the English colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America. A Proclamation. ... I ... do hereby appoint Thursday the fourteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber at New-Haven, the fourteenth day of October ... 1771. [Hartford: Printed by Ebenezer Watson, 1771]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esq; governor of the English colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America. A Proclamation. ... I ... do hereby appoint, Thursday the fifth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this colony ... Given under my hand, at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, the thirteenth day of October ... 1772. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1772]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esq; governor of the English colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America. A Proclamation. ... I ... do hereby appoint, Thursday the fifth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this colony ... Given under my hand, at the Council-chamber in New-Haven, the thirteenth day of October ... 1772. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1772]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New Haven, the sixteenth day of October ... 1773. [New Haven?: s.n., 1773]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 26 cm.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor of the English colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America; a Proclamation. ... I ... do hereby appoint Thursday the twenty-fourth day of November next, to be observed and attended as a day of Publick Thanksgiving thro'out this colony ... Given under my hand, at the Council chamber at New-Haven, the twenty seventh day of October ... 1774. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1774]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. (Colony) Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the sixteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the Council chamber in New-Haven, the fourteenth day of October ... 1775. [New Haven?: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green?, 1775]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 27 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By the Honorable Jonathan Trumbull, Esq; governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New-Haven, the 25th day of October ... 1776. [New Haven?: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green?, 1776]. 1 sheet.

    I ... do hereby appoint Thursday the fifth day of December next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this State; directing and exhoring all Denominations and Orders of People, to present their Thank-Offering unto the Fountain of all our Mercies, and pay their Vows unto the ost High, who giveth Songs inthe Night of their Affliction: -- To bless and praise His Name for all the Bounties of His Providence, and the far richer Blessings of His Grace, in which we share. --In an especial Manner to ascribe Blassing and Praise, Honour and Thanksgiving unto our GOD, for the Enjoyment of the Mans of Grace, Sabbath and Sanctuary Advantages: --For that Harmony and Staability which subsists inthe public Councils of the United States: --For the Courage, Resolution, and Readiness of the People to stand forth in the Defence of their Rights, Liberties, and Privileges: --For every Instance of Protection and Success in their military Operations against their powerful Enemies: --For that Measure of Health enjoyed in the Country and Army: --And for every Expression of his loving Kindness, and tender Mercy: --And at the same Time, to implore GOD's gracious Presence with the General Congreess of the United States of America: --That he would give them Wisdom, Ability and Fidelity equal to the trust reposed in them, and the Weight of public Business laid upon them: --That all our Assemblies, Conventions, and Councils may be directed, owned and blessed: --That HE would form our Generals, Officers, and Soliery for their Department, and honor them as the Instruments of our Deliverance: --That HE would pour out HIS SPIRIT in plentiful Effusions upon His Churches and Ministers in this and all the States, and that the whole Land may be a Temple in which GOD is served and glorified: --That Seminaries of Learning, and other inferior Schools of Instruciton may be every where amongst us, succeeded: -- That the People of this State in particular, may be blessed in all their temporal and spiritual Concerns: --That GOD would make us glad according to the Days wherein we have been afflicted, and the Time wherein we have seen Evil: --This his Work may appear unto his Servants, and his Glory unto Childrens Children: --that the Beauty of the Lord our GOD may be upon us, and that HE would establish the Work of our Hands: --That HE would bring the Heathen into CHRIST's Sheep-fold: --And fill the Universe with the Display of His glorious Perfections, in and through JESUS CHRIST our Lord and Saviour. All servile Labour is forbidded on said Day."

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esq: ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twentieth day of November next to be observed as a day of Public praise and Thanksgiving throughout this State. Directing and exhorting all Denominations and Orders of People, to bless the Most High GOD for his great Wisdom and Goodness, the mighty Acts of his Providence by which we are defended, and for all the Favours and Comforts of Life. That we have a Plenty of the Fruits of the Earth almost unparallelled, and though often disturbed by the Alarm of War, had Opportunity for Ingathering them. To praise the Sovereign Lord of Life for the Health of our Countenance, and the Vigour of our Days--that the Inhabitants, and especially our Soldiery in the Field, have been preserved from most sickness, and enabled to endure the Fatigues of a Campaign with uncommon Firmness and Spirit. To render unfeigned Praise to the LORD OF HOSTS, that he hath appeared for us in the Mount of Difficulty, and Day of War--inspired our Officers both General and Subordinate with such Wisdom and fortitude, and our Soldiers with such Bravery, that their Arms have been terrible to the common Enemy, and with the Blessing of Heaven, the Means of procuring us to great Salvation. And while devout Praise is rendered for every Influence of Military Success, to take special Notice of GOD's Goodness in the deafeat and Conquest of our Enemies in the Northern Department; a Blessing in which the states of New-England are especially interested. That when our Enemy trusting in the Strength of their own Wisdom and Power, and the mighty preparation of war, threatened us with every Evil that Humanity can deprecate; the LORD beheld and confounded them, bringing Salvation out of those Events, which alarmed our apprehensions. And especially to sing of GOD's Goodness, and the Glory of his Perfections in Redeeming Men ... permitting us to enjoy Christian Previliges [sic] and to hope for a happy Immortality; and for every Blessing by which the Glory of his Mercy is magnified. ...
    Given under my hand at the council chamber in Hartford, the thirty-first day of October ... 1777. Hartford: Printed by Hannah Watson, near the Great-Bridge, [1777]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire ... A Proclamation, for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-sixth day of November instant ... Given under my hand, in the council chamber in Hartford, the second day of November ... one thousand seven hundred seventy-eight. [Hartford: s.n., 1778]. 1 sheet; 38 x 25 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). A Proclamation. It having pleased Almighty God ... to bestow great and manifold mercies ... Resolved, that it be and hereby is recommended to ... the said states, to appoint Wednesday the thirtieth day of December next ... as a day of public thanksgiving ... Done in Congress, this 17th day of November, 1778 ...
    Followed by: By the Governor. On consideration of the foregoing Proclamation ... I have thought fit ... and do hereby concur with Congress ... Given under my hand in Lebanon, the fourth day of December ... one thousand, seven hundred, and seventy-eight. Signed: Jonath. Trumbull./ Evans supplies title: By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire ... A Proclamation; and enters under heading for Connecticut. New-London [Conn.]: Printed by T. Green, printer to the governor and Co. of the State of Connecticut, 1778. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). Proclamation. Connecticut: s.n., 1780. 1 sheet. Ascribed to the press of Timothy Green of New London by Evans, but not listed in H.A. Johnson's Checklist of New London imprints.
    Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God the Father of all mercies, amidst the viciffitudes and calamities of War, to bestow Blessings on the People of these States which call for their devout and thankful Acknowledgments; more especially in the late remarkable Interposition of his watchful Providence, in rescuing the Person of our Commander in Chief and the Army from imminent Dangers, at the Moment when Treason was ripened for execution; in prospering the Labours of the Husbandmen, and causing the Earth to yield its Increase in plentiful Harvests; and above all in continuing to us the Enjoyment of the Gospel of Peace.
    It is therefore recommended to the several states to set apart Thursday the Seventh Day of December next to be observed as a Day of public Thanksgiving and Prayer--That all the People may assemble on that Day, to celebrate the Praises of our Divine Benefactor--to confess our unworthiness of the least of his Favours, and to offer our fervent Supplications to the God of all Grace--That it may please him to pardon our heinous Transgressions and incline our Heats for the future to keep all his Laws--To comfort and relieve our Brethren who are in any wise afflicted or distressed--To smile upon our Husbandry and Trade--To direct our public Councils, and lead our Forces by Land and Sea to victory--To take our Illustrious Ally under his special Protection, and favour our joint Councils and Exertions for the Establishment of speedy and permanent Peace--To cherish all Schools and Seminaries of Education, and to cause the Knowledge of Christianity to spread over all the Earth.
    Done in Congress, this eighteenth day of October, 1780, and in the fifth Year of the Independence of the United States of America. Signed: Samuel Huntington, president. Attest, Charles Thomson, see'ry [sic]./
    Followed by:
    By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor, captain-general and commander in chief in and over the state of Connecticut, in America. I have thought fit, by and with the Advice of the Council, and at the rEquest of the House of Representatives, to appoint, and do hereby appoint Thursday the seventh day of December next, to be observed as a Day of public Thanksgiving and Prayer throughout this State, hereby exhorting all, both Ministers and People, religiuosly to observe the same, in Conformity to the foregoing Proclamation issued by the Honorable Congress of the United States of America.
    All servile Labour is forbidden on said Day.
    Given under my hand, in the Council chamber at Hartford, this second day of November, 1780, in the Fifth Year of the Independence of the United States of America. Jonathan Trumbull.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). Proclamation: Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God ... to assist and support the United States of America in their important struggle for liberty ... It is therefore recommended ... to set apart the thirteenth day of December next ... as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Done in Congress this twenty-sixth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty one ... Followed by: By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull ... A Proclamation. I have thought fit ... and do hereby appoint, the thirteenth day of December next ... as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand in Lebanon, this twenty-second day of November ... one thousand, seven hundred and eighty-one .../ Evans supplies title: By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull ... A Proclamation; and enters under the heading for Connecticut./ Printed area measures 37.6 x 21.8 cm.New-London [Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the governor and Co., 1781. 1 sheet ([1] p.); 43 x 34 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire ... A Proclamation: I have thought fit, on the foregoing recommendation and request of the United States in Congress assembled ... Given under my hand at Lebanon, this thirty-first day of October ... one thousand, seven hundred and eighty-two. New-London [Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the governor and Company, 1782. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twentieth day of November next ... Given under my hand in the council chamber at New-Haven, this 29th day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-three. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1783]. 1 sheet; 58 x 48 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1769-1784: Trumbull). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. Followed by: By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull ... A Proclamation. Whereas since issuing my Proclamation appointing the twentieth day of November instant ... a day of public thanksgiving in this state, the foregoing has been received from the president of Congress ... Whereupon it is judged expedient to postpone the day appointed ... Given under my hand at Lebanon, this seventh day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-three .../ Printed area measures 38.3 x 26.8 cm. New-London [Conn.]: Printed by Timothy Green, printer to the governor and Co.., 1783. 1 sheet ([1] p.); 50 x 39 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1784-1786: Griswold). By His Excellency Matthew Griswold, Esquire, governor, captain general, and commander in chief, in and over the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the second day of December next to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New-Haven, the first day of November, annoque Domini 1784. New-Haven: Printed by Meigs, Bowen and Dana, in Chapel-Street, [1784]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1784-1786: Griswold). By His Excellency Matthew Griswold, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in the council chamber in New-Haven, the seventeenth day of October ... 1785. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1785]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-third day of November next, to be religiously observed as a day of Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, in the council chamber at New-Haven, the twenty-seventh day of October, Anno Domini 1786 New-Haven: Printed by Meigs & Dana, [1786]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the fifteenth day of November next to be religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the council chamber in New-Haven, the twenty second day of October ... 1787. New-Haven: Printed by Daniel Bowen, [1787]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire; governor and commander in chief, in and over the state of Connecticut, in America. A Proclamation. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1788]. 1 sheet.
    Considering the great and manifold favors, which it pleased Almighty God, the Father of Mercies, to bestow upon the inhabitants of this Land, and the people of this State in the course of the current year, which demand our sincere and grateful Acknowledgment:
    I Have thought fit, by, and with the advice of the Council, and at the desire of the Representatives, in General Court assembled, to appoint, and do hereby appoint, Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November next, to be religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this State; earnestly exhorting ministers and people of all Denominations, with becoming devotion, to assemble for divine and social worship; and with grateful hearts, to acknowledge the divine goodness in the great and distinguishing Favors and blessings bestowed upon these United States, and the people of this State in particular: For the continuation of the inestimable privileges of the Gospel and means of Grace, the blessings of Peace, and for the general health enjoyed; the supplies of the fruits of the Earth, notwithstanding the harvests are in some measure diminished; and for all other innumerable favors and unmerited mercies conferred upon us from the fountain of all goodness: Also to offer up fervent supplication and prayer to Almighty God, the supreme Governor of the Universe, and ruler of the Kingdoms of Men, that it may graciously please him, to shower divine blessings upon the people of these Untied States; disposing them in a yet unexampled manner, to unite in voluntarily forming a salutary Constitution, which shall best fulfill the purposes of Civil Government, by securing the unalienable Rights of Individuals, and removing Oppression far from them, and in promoting the prosperity and permanent happiness of the Union: Inspire all in civil Administration with wisdom and Integrity: Abundantly bless the inhabitants of this State: Succeed a preached Gospel and the means of Grace, and cause pure religion to flourish: Grant us health in all our dwellings: Continue peace; make our land a quiet habitation and refuge for the oppressed; caused the Earth to yield her increase, and bless us in all our interests and concerns: Extend his mercies to all Mankind: Dispose the Nations of the Earth to universal peace, and put a period to the calamities of war; and cause the world to be filled with the Knowledge and Glory of God. And all servile Labor is forbidden on said day.
    Given at the Council chamber at New-Haven, the thirteenth day of October in the Thirteenth Year of the independence of the United States of America, Annoque Domini, 1788.

  • Connecticut. Lieutenant Governor (1786-1796: Wolcott). By the Honourable Oliver Wolcott Esquire, Lieutenant Governor and Commander in chief of the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. Hartford, 1790. 1 sheet; 39.5 x 32.5 cm.
    ... CONSIDERING that it becomes Mankind in their social relations to assemble at special and particular acknowledge their dependence upon their ALMIGHTY CREATOR.--to deprecate his displeasure and with true repentance to implore the Divine Mercy, favour and forgiveness;--and that it would please GOD to grant them every Spiritual and Temporal Blessing which their Condition requires.
    I HAVE therefore thought fit, by advice of Council, and according to the pious and laudable practice of our Ancestors, to appoint, and I do hereby appoint THURSDAY, the Fourteenth Day of April next, to be observed as a Day of PUPLICK HUMILIATION, FASTING, and PRAYER to ALMIGHTY GOD, throughout this State; hereby recommending to Ministers and People of every Society, Church and Congregation, that they respectively assemble on said day, and with true devotion, supplicate the divine mercy and favour towards us. That God would be pleased to pardon our Ingratitude to HIM, who is our Creator and Preserver, who hath supplied our wants from the bounties of HIS providence, has furnished us with the knowledge of HIS will, and provided for us a Saviour.--That God would be graciously pleased to pardon all our violations of HIS holy law, and ever incline us to obey HIS Will.--That it would please God to direct the Public Councils, and Administration of this State, and duly impress the minds of HIS People with the adverse dispensation of HIS providence in removing the Chief Magistrate thereof by death.--That God would preserve the health of HIS People;--grant them suitable seasons;--cause the Earth to yield her increase,--prosper and bless us in our husbandry and commerce, and in all our other lawful vocations;--and cause that the Ministers of the glorious Gospel of Christ Jesus may ever be the instrument of HIS praise.--That the United States of America may be under the protection of the Almighty, be preserved from the calamities of War, and continue richly to participate in the favours of divine providence.--That our National Council may be under the guidance of unerring Wisdom.--That it may please God to grant his direction and support to the President of the United States, prolong his important life, and continue him a blessing to our Nation.--That God would controul the rage of contending Nations, prepare them for, and establish them in the permanent enjoyment of their just rights and liberties.--And that God would cause the knowledge of the great Salvation to be spread throughout the world, and establish the peaceful Kingdom
    {Omitted text, 10w} of March, in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and nine[ty]-{Omitted text, 10w} Independence of the United States of America.
    OLIVER WOLCOTT.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esq. ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the eleventh day of November next, to be religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the council chamber in New-Haven, the 27th day of October, A.D. 1790. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1790]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the council chamber in New-Haven, the twenty-sixth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-one New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1791]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the council chamber in New-Haven, the 24th day of October ... one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-two New-Haven---: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1792]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire, governor and commander in chief of the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the fourteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council chamber in New-Haven, the twenty-second day of October, anno Domini, 1793. New-Haven: --Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1793]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington Esquire. ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November next, to be observed as a day of Thanksgiving ... Given at the council chamber in Middletown, the twenty-second day of October, A.D. one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four Middletown [Conn.]: Printed by Moses H. Woodward, [1794]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). State of Connecticut January 23, 1795. By His Excellency Samuel Huntington Esquire: The following Proclamation is hereby ordered to be publicly read in the several religious societies and congregations of all denominations throughout this state. [Hartford : Printed by Elisha Babcock, 1795] 1 sheet ([1] p.)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1786-1796: Huntington). By His Excellency Samuel Huntington, Esquire ... a Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth day of December next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the council chamber in New-Haven, the twenty-first day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five New-Haven: Printed by T.& S. Green, [1795]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1796-1797: Wolcott). By His Excellency Oliver Wolcott, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-second day of December next, to be religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the city of New-Haven, the thirty-first day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six New-Haven--: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green, [1796]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1796-1797: Wolcott). By his excellency Oliver Wolcott, Esq. Governor and Commander in chief of the State of Connecticut. A Proclamation... Litchfield, 1797. 1 sheet; 49 x 32.5 cm.
    AS it peculiarly becomes a Christian People, at particular and stated Seasons, by Humiliation and Prayer, to pay their devout Homage to Almighty GOD;--
    I HAVE thought proper to appoint, and do hereby appoint, FRIDAY, the Fourteenth Day of April next, to be observed as a Day of public Humiliation, FASTINGand Prayer, throughout this State; recommending to all the People, in their solemn Assemblies, on that Day, devoutly to acknowledge their Dependance on the Supreme Rulerof the Universe, and with sincere Repentance for our many Sins, humbly to implore, of a merciful God their Forgiveness and Remission, the gracious Aids of his Spirit, and the Blessings of his Providence.
    That he would continue to us and successive Generations, the Gospel of Peace and Salvation;--teach the Hearts of all Men to know its Truth and Excellence, and to obey its holy Precepts:--Succeed and Means of Education and Learning; bless our Youth, furnish their Minds with useful Knowledge, and enrich them with the christian Graces:--That he would smile on our Husbandry; give and preserve to us the goodly Fruits of the Earth:--Prosper our Commerce, restrain the arbitrary Enterprizes for extensively practiced upon it, and cause the Nations at War, to observe towards our Trade and Navigation, the Laws of Justice and good Faith;--save us from desolating Diseases; and grant that in all our lawful Business and Vocations, we may experience the Divine Care and Beneficence. And moreover, humbly to beseech the Throne of Grace, that the God of Wisdom would enlighten the public Councils of this State, thereby to increase the Means of social Improvement and Happiness among the People, and to confirm and perpetuate the public Order, Liberty and Tranquility.
    That the United States may continue to be under the Superintendence and holy Protection of the Sovereign Arbiter of Nations:--That he would inspire all our Citizens with a Love of their Country, and each other; cement our Union; impart to all Departments of the Government Wisdom and Integrity, uprightly and ably to conduct the public Interests confided to their Care:--Still continue graciously to smile on our earnest and faithful Endeavours to preserve our Peace;--cause the Negociations with the French Republic to issue in the Acknowledgment and secure Establishment of our just Rights, and the Restoration of Amity and good Agreement between the two Countries.
    And that it would please God to afford his gracious Aids to the President of the United States, in the Discharge of the arduous Duties on which he is entering; and that he may be enabled, by a wise and impartial Administration of them, to preserve that Confidence of the People in this Branch of our Government, by which it has been so eminently distinguished:--That the Benedictions of Heaven may attend the late President of the United States, in his Retirement from his long, useful and disinterested Services to our Country.
    And that God, who is the Author of Peace and Lover of Concord, would restrain the Rage, and Pride of warring Nations, and cause them to submit to righteous and equitable Terms of Peace.
    An that all those to whom the Ministration of the Gospel of Christ Jesusis committed, may be influenced by that Spirit which the Gospel is adapted to inspire; and that the Effect of their Ministration may be the Advancement of peaceful Kingdom of the Great Redeemeramong Mankind.
    All servile Labour on said Day is forbidden.
    Given at Litchfield, this seventeenth Day of March, in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the twenty-first.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1796-1797: Wolcott). By His Excellency Oliver Wolcott, Esquire, governor and commander in chief of the state of Connecticut: a Proclamation. ... Thursday the sixteenth day of November next to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer ... Given at Litchfield, this 25th day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety seven New-Haven: --Printed by T. & S. Green, [1797]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next, to be set apart and religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand at New-Haven, this twenty-second day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight New-Haven--: Printed by Thomas & Samuel Green, [1798]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut) David Barton: Jonathan Trumbull (1740-1809); Trumbull was a soldier and statesman from Connecticut. He served as paymaster/comptroller of the treasury for the American army (1775-80); aide-de-camp to General George Washington (1780-83); U.S. Congressman (1789-95) Speaker of the House (1791-95); U.S. Senator (1795); Lieutenant-Governor of Connecticut (1796-98); and Governor of Connecticut (1798-1809). His father, also named Jonathan (1710-1785), was a minister and statesman who was a close friend of General Washington and the only colonial governor to ardently support the American Revolution.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-eighth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, at New-Haven, this 21st day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine New-Haven: Printed by Thomas Green and Son., [1799]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut)

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor and commander in chief, in and over the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, at New-Haven, this twentieth day of October, in the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred New-Haven: Printed by Thomas Green & Son., [1800]. 1 sheet.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esq. governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Friday the third day of April next, to be set apart and observed throughout this state as a day of solemn and sincere humiliation, fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand at Lebanon in said state, this 3d day of March ... one thousand eight hundred and one. [Proclamation. 1801 Mar. 3]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-sixth day of November next, to be solemnized throughout this state, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand at New-Haven, this nineteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and one.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). A Proclamation: the unwearied goodness, which we are continually experiencing, from our Divine Benefactor, is calculated to excite our hearts to constant returns of gratitude ... do hereby appoint Thursday the twenty-sixth day of November next, to be solemnized throughout this state, as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... / by Jonathan Trumbull New-Haven [Conn.]: Printed by Thomas Green & Son, [1801] 1 broadside.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). A Proclamation: seriously and gratefully considering the numerous blessings ... which in this current year, the people of this state have bounteously enjoyed. / by Jonathan Trumbull New Haven [Conn.]: Printed by Thomas Green & Son, [1802] 1 broadside.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Friday the sixteenth day of April next, to be set apart and observed, throughout this state, as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer ... Given under my hand at Lebanon in said state, this 8th day of March ... 1802. [Proclamation. 1802 Mar. 8]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next, to be observed throughout this state, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New-Haven, this 27th day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and two. [Proclamation. 1802 Oct. 27]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire. Governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. ... Friday the eighth day of April next, to be kept and observed throughout this state, as a day of public humiliation, solemn fasting and devout prayer ... Given under my hand at Lebanon ... this first day of March ... one thousand eight hundred and three. [Proclamation. 1803 Mar. 1]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut ... A Proclamation. The constant and unmerited favors, conferred by a merciful God on the people of this state, demand their ... acknowledgment ...... Thursday the twenty-fourth day of November next, to be observed throughout this state, as a day of thanksgiving, praise and prayer ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New-Haven, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and three. [New Haven, Conn: s.n., 1803]. 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1803 Oct. 27]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esquire, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ... Friday the thirtieth day of March next, to be observed throughout this state, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer. ... Given under my hand at Lebanon ... this twenty-fifth day of February ... one thousand eight hundred and four. [Proclamation. 1804 Feb. 25]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation, in pursuance of the long established and laudable practice of the New England states ...: I have thought proper, with the advice of the council ... and do hereby appoint, Thursday the fifteenth day of November next, to be observed throughout this state, as a day of public thanksgiving, praise, and prayer ... Given under my hand at the Council chamber in New-Haven, this twenty-third day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and four. [New Haven, Conn.]: Printed by T. Green & Son, [1804] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1804 Oct. 23]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, governor ... of Connecticut. A Proclamation. The passing year has given abundant experience of the care of divine providence over His creatures ... Thursday the twenty-eighth day of November next, to be observed ... as a day of joyful thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, in the Council chamber, at the city of New-Haven, this 23d day of October ... 1805. [New Haven, Conn.]: Printed by T. Green & Son, 1805. 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1805 Oct. 23].

  • Connecticut. Governor (1797-1809: Trumbull, Jr.). By His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esq: ... A Proclamation. [New Haven, Conn.]: Green and Son, printers, 1807. 1 sheet ([1] p.): ill. (relief cut); 49 x 41 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1811-1812: Griswold). A Proclamation. / by Roger Griswold [New Haven, Conn.?: T. Green, Jr.?, 1811] 1 broadside.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1812-1817: Smith). A Proclamation: although it has pleased the Most High to visit us as a people with his righteous judgments. / by John Cotton Smith [New-Haven, Conn.?: T. Green, Jr.?, 1813] 1 broadside.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1812-1817: Smith). A Proclamation: whereas it is the duty of a people, at stated seasons, Publickly to testify their gratitude to almighty God. / by John Cotton Smith [New-Haven, Conn.?: T. Green, Jr.?, 1815] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1815 Oct. 24]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1838-1842: Ellsworth). By His Excellency William W. Ellsworth, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and the seal of said state, at Hartford, this sixteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight. [Proclamation. 1838 Oct. 16]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1838-1842: Ellsworth). By His Excellency William W. Ellsworth, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the nineteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and the seal of said state, at Hartford, this tenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and forty. [Proclamation. 1840 Oct. 10]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1842-1844: Cleveland, Chauncey F.). [Seal] By His Excellency Chauncey F. Cleveland, governor of the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. Gratitude to Almighty God for His manifold blessings, both spiritual and temporal, is the first and highest duty of intelligent beings. I do, therefore, recommend that Thursday, the seventeenth day of November next, be observed by the people of this State as a day of Christian thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand and the seal of the State, at Hampton, this eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-two. Chauncey F. Cleveland. Hampton, 1842. 1 sheet; 40.5 x 30 cm. [Proclamation. 1842 Oct. 18]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1858-1866: Buckingham, William A.). By His Excellency William A. Buckingham, Governor of the State of Connecticut. A Proclamation. [Proclamation. 1858 Oct. 22]
    It is both the duty and privilege of a Christian people, to recognize their obligations to the Bountiful Giver of All Good. During the past year we have experienced fresh and continued evidence of the divine favor and forbearance.
    Therefore I have thought proper to recommend, and I do hereby recommend, that Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next, be set apart as a day of Public Thanksgiving and Praise throughout this Commonwealth, and I earnestly invite and urge all persons to unite on that day in a public manifestation of their gratitude to Almighty God, who has crowned the year with his goodness; in that he has caused the earth to bring forth its fruits in their season; that he has averted from us the pestilence and the sword; that he has saved us from civil commotion and the supremacy of evil passions; that a deeper interest is felt in our public schools and seminaries of learning; that progress has been made in the arts, in the sciences and in civilization; that public justice is administered under the sanction of law; that freedom of opinion, of speech, and of conscience, is vindicated; that the love of civil and religious liberty is deeply seated in the hearts of the people ; that the Independence of the States and of the Federal Union, is still preserved; and above all, that "He hath not dealt with us after our sins, nor rewarded us according to our iniquities," but has magnified the riches of his grace in giving his Holy Spirit to revive his work and lead sinners to repentance; and that the door of mercy is yet open, through which the guilty and perishing may enter and obtain eternal life, by faith in the atonement of Jesus Christ his Son.
    Given under my hand and seal of the State, at the city of Norwich, this the twenty-second day of October, in the [L. S.] year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-third.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1858-1866: Buckingham, William A.). By His Excellency, William A. Buckingham, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... to observe Thursday, the 28th instant, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, in the city of Hartford, this, the second day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. [Proclamation. 1861 Nov. 2]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1858-1866: Buckingham, William A.). By His Excellency William A. Buckingham, governor and commander-chief in and over the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... I therefore recommend the people of this state to observe Thursday, the 27th day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at the city of Hartford, this, the thirty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. [Proclamation. 1862 Oct. 31]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1858-1866: Buckingham, William A.). [Arms] By His Excellency William A. Buckingham, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... As "he has not dealt so with any nation," the citizens of this state are recommended to observe Thursday, the 26th day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my hand a caused the seal of the state to be affixed, at the city of Hartford, this, the twenty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. Hartford, 1863. 1 sheet; 42 x 27.5 cm.[Proclamation. 1863 Oct. 21] Also here.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1858-1866: Buckingham, William A.). By His Excellency William A. Buckingham, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next, is hereby set apart throughout this state as a day of public thanksgiving, prayer, and praise ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the state, at the city of Hartford, this the twenty-fourth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. [Proclamation. 1865 Oct. 24].

  • Connecticut. Governor (1867-1869: English, James E.). By His Excellency James E. English, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... I do hereby recommend that Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next, be religiously observed by the people of this state, as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at New Haven, this twenty-sixth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven. [Proclamation. 1867 Oct. 26]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1867-1869: English, James E.). By His Excellency James E. English, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... I do hereby recommend that Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next, be observed by the people of this state as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at New Haven, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy. [Proclamation. 1870 Oct. 17]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1871-1872: Jewell, Marshall). By His Excellency Marshall Jewell, governor of the state of Connecticut, a Proclamation. I hereby set apart and appoint Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at Hartford, this thirtieth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one. [Proclamation. 1871 Oct. 30]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1871-1872: Jewell, Marshall). [Arms] By His Excellency Marshall Jewell, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ... I do hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at Hartford, this twenty-eighth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two. Marshall Jewell. Hartford, 1872. 1 sheet; 42.5 x 28 cm.[Proclamation. 1872 Oct. 28] Also here.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1873-1877: Ingersoll, Charles R.). By His Excellency Charles R. Ingersoll, governor of the state of Connecticut, A Proclamation. ...I do hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state at New Haven, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three. [Proclamation. 1873 Oct. 27]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1873-1877: Ingersoll, Charles R.). By His Excellency, Charles R. Ingersoll, governor of the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ...I do therefore appoint Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at Hartford, on this twenty-ninth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five.[Proclamation. 1875 Oct. 29]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1873-1877: Ingersoll, Charles R.). By His Excellency Charles R. Ingersoll, governor of the state of Connecticut. A Proclamation. ...I do hereby appoint Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, at Hartford, this twenty-eighth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six. [Proclamation. 1876 Oct. 28]

  • Connecticut. Governor (1879-1881: Andrews). [Arms] State of Connecticut. Charles B. Andrews, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. By His Excellency the Governor, A Proclamation. I appoint Friday, the 11th day of April next, to be a day of public fasting, humiliation, and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this eighth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-nine ... Charles B. Andrews. Hartford, 1879. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1881-1883: Bigelow). [Arms] State of Connecticut. Hobart B. Bigelow, Governor and Commander-in-chief. By His Excellency the Governor, A Proclamation. In accordance with the ancient and venerable usage of this Commonwealth, I do hereby appoint Friday, the fifteenth day of April next, a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twenty-third day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one ... Hobart B. Bigelow. Hartford, 1881. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1881-1883: Bigelow). [Arms] State of Connecticut. Hobart B. Bigelow. Governor and Commander-in-Chief. By His Excellency the Governor, A Proclamation. In accordance therefore with ancient usage, I hereby appoint Thursday, the thirtieth day of November, next, a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and seal of the State ... this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-two ... Hartford, 1882. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1883-1885: Waller). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Thomas M. Waller. Governor. A Proclamation... I designate and set apart Friday the twenty-third day of this month of March, as a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer. Given under my hand ... thi Hartford, 1883. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1883-1885: Waller). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency, Thomas M. Waller, Governor. A Proclamation. Hartford, 1884. 1 sheet; 43.5 x 28 cm.
    The People of this Commonwealthare invited to abstain, after the Manner of their Fathers, on Friday, the Eleventh Day of April next, from all Servile Labor and Vain Recreation, and solemnly devote themselves to Fasting, Humiliation, and Prayer.
    And they are earnestly exhorted on that Day to invoke the Blessings of Almighty God upon all the Interests and Institutions of our State and Nation, and otherwise reverently to keep and regard the Day as a Fast Unto the Lord.
    Given under my hand and Seal of the State, at the Capitol in Hartford, this Twenty-Fifth Day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand, eight hundred and eighty-four, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighth.
    Thomas M. Waller.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1883-1885: Waller). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Thomas M. Waller, Governor. A Thanksgiving Proclamation. In furtherance of the custom of their New England forefathers, the people of this Commonwealth are invited, on Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of this month of November, to celebrate at their altars and hearthstones God's goodness to them ... Given under my hand ... this tenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-four .... Hartford, 1884. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1885-1887: Harrison). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Exellency Henry B. Harrison, Governor. A Proclamation. In accordance with ancient custom, I hereby appoint Friday the third day of April next, to be observed throughout this State as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this nineteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five ... Henry B. Harrison. Hartford, 1885. 1 sheet; 43.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1885-1887: Harrison). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Henry B. Harrison, Governor. A Proclamation. I hereby invite the people of this State to celebrate Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of this month of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this sixth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand and eight hundred and eighty-five ... Henry B. Harrison. Hartford, 1885. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1885-1887: Harrison). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Henry B. Harrison, Governor. A Proclamation. In continuance of an immemorial and venerable custom ... I hereby designate and appoint Friday, the twenty-third day of this month of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty- six ... Henry B. Harrison. Hartford, 1886. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1887-1889: Lounsbury, Phineas C.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Phineas C. Lounsbury, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the eighth day of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand and seal of the State ... this twenty-third day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven ... Phineas C. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1887. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1887-1889: Lounsbury, Phineas C.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Phineas C. Lounsbury, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday the twenty-fourth of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this eighth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven ... Phineas C. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1887. 1 sheet; 33.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1887-1889: Lounsbury, Phineas C.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Phineas C. Lounsbury, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the thirtieth of March, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ...this sixteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight ... Phineas C. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1888. 1 sheet; 33 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1887-1889: Lounsbury, Phineas C.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Phineas C. Lounsbury, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-ninth of November, as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twentieth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight ... Phineas C. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1888. 1 sheet; 33.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1903: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the nineteenth day of April next, as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer ... Given under my hand and the seal of the ? Hartford, 1889. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1903: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth instant a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand ... this eleventh day of November ... Hartford, 1889.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1903: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor. A Proclamation... IN reverent recognition of Almighty God, I hereby appoint Friday, the fourth day of April next, a day of FASTING and PRAYER.
    Remembering how abundantly he has, in the past, answered the prayers of this people, let us upon that day, in our homes and churches, with penitence, humility, and prayer, devoutly supplicate Him that He withdraw not His favor from us, but in His infinite mercy continue unto us the blessings which have hitherto crowned our cup, and made us a free, prosperous, and happy people.
    Given under my hand and the seal of the State ... this fifteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord [L. S] one thousand eight hundred and ninety, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and fourteenth. Hartford, 1890. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1903: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the twenty-seventh instant, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand ... this fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety ... Morgan G. Bulkeley. Hartford, 1890. 1 sheet; 43.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1893: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor of the State of Connecticut. A proclamation. I hereby designate and appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth of November, as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Given under ... Hartford, 1891.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1903: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor. A Proclamation. In accordance with custom, I hereby appoint Friday, the fifteenth day of April next, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this ... Hartford, 1892. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1889-1903: Bulkeley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Morgan G. Bulkeley, Governor of the State of Connecticut. A Proclamation. I hereby appoint Thursday, the 24th day of November, a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this sixteenth ... Hartford, 1892. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1893-1895: Morris). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Luzon B. Morris, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, November 30th, a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this fifteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three ... Luzon B. Morris. Hartford, 1893. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1893-1895: Morris). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Luzon B. Morris, Governor. A Proclamation. I hereby appoint Friday, the twenty-third day of March as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this thirteenth day of March, in the year ? Hartford, 1894. 1 sheet; 43.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1893-1895: Morris). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Luzon B. Morris, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the 29th day of November, A. D. 1894, as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this sixteenth day of ... Hartford, 1894. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1895-1897: Coffin). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency O. Vincent Coffin Governor. A Proclamation. Following an appropriate and honored custom, I hereby appoint Friday, the twelfth day of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand and ... Hartford, 1895. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1895-1897: Coffin). [Arms] State of Connecticut. A Proclamation by the Governor ... I hereby appoint Friday, the third day of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twenty-third day of March, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eig. Hartford, 1896. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1895-1897: Coffin). [Arms] State of Connecticut. Proclamation by the Governor... I hereby designate and appoint Thursday, November the twenty-sixth, as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this twelfth day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and ninety- six ... O. Vincent Coffin. Hartford, 1896. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1897-1899: Cooke). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Lorrin A. Cooke Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby designate and appoint Friday, the sixteenth day of April next, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand and the seal of the State, Hartford, 1897. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1897-1899: Cooke). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Lorrin A. Cooke Governor A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November, a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and I recommend that the people of this State abstain from Hartford, 1897. 1 sheet; 43.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1897-1899: Cooke). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Lorrin A. Cooke Governor. A Proclamation. Following a custom as old as the State and in harmony with our laws, I hereby designate and appoint Friday, the eighth day of April next as a day of fasting ? Hartford, 1898. 1 sheet; 43.5 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1897-1899: Cooke). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Lorrin A. Cooke Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby designate and appoint the twenty-fourth day of November, instant, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand and ... Hartford, 1898. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1899-1901: Lounsbury, George E.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George E. Lounsbury Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the thirty-first of March, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twenty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine ... George E. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1899. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1899-1901: Lounsbury, George E.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George E. Lounsbury Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday the thirtieth of November as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand and the seal of the State, this eleve Hartford, 1899. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1899-1901: Lounsbury, George E.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George E. Lounsbury, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the thirteenth of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ...Given under my hand ... this twenty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred ... George E. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1900. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1887-1889: Lounsbury, George E.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George E. Lounsbury, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the 29th of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand and the seal of the State, this fourteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred ... George E. Lounsbury. Hartford, 1900. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1901-1903: McLean). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George P. McLean, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the fifth day of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twenty-second day March, in the year ... Hartford, 1901. 1 sheet; 43.2 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1901-1903: McLean). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George P. McLean, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this fifteenth day of Nov Hartford, 1901. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1901-1903: McLean). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George P. McLean, Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this thirty-first day of ... Hartford, 1902. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1903-1905: Chamberlain). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Abiram Chamberlain, Governor. A Proclamation. In harmony with established custom I hereby appoint Friday, the tenth day of April next, as a day of fasting, penitence and prayer ... Given under my hand ... Hartford, 1903. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1903-1905: Chamberlain). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Abiram Chamberlain, Governor. A Proclamation... I appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November, a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand ... this eleventh day of ... Hartford, 1903. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1903-1905: Chamberlain). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Abiram Chamberlain, Governor. A Proclamation... I appoint Friday, April the first, a day of fasting, penitence and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this eighteenth day of March, one thousand nine Hartford, 1904. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1903-1905: Chamberlain). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Abiram Chamberlain Governor. A Proclamation. I hereby set apart Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November, as a day of praise and thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this eleventh day of ... Hartford, 1904. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1905-1907: Roberts). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Henry Roberts Governor A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, April the twenty-first, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this sixth day of April, in the year of our Lord ... Hartford, 1905. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1905-1907: Roberts). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Henry Roberts Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday the thirtieth of November as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand ... this eighth day of November, in the year ... Hartford, 1905. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1905-1907: Roberts). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Henry Roberts Governor A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the thirteenth of April, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twenty-seventh day of March, in the year ... Hartford, 1906. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1905-1907: Roberts). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Henry Roberts Governor. A Proclamation... I therefore appoint Thursday, the twenty-ninth of November, as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand ... this seventh day of November, ... Hartford, 1906. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1907-1909: Woodruff). [Arms] State of Connecticut. Rollin S. Woodruff Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint the twenty-ninth day of March as a day of devotion, of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this fourteenth day of March, in the year of our ? Hartford, 1907. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1907-1909: Woodruff). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Rollin S. Woodruff Governor A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth of November, as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this ninth day of November in the year ... Hartford, 1907. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1907-1909: Woodruff). [Arms] State of Connecticut. Rollin S. Woodruff. Governor A Proclamation... I hereby appoint the seventeenth day of April as a day of devotion, of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this second day of April, in the year of our Lord, Hartford, 1908. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1907-1909: Woodruff). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Rollin S. Woodruff Governor, A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this twelfth day of November, in the ... Hartford, 1908. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1909: Lilley). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency George L. Lilley Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Friday, the ninth day of April next ensuing, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this thirtieth day of March, in ... Hartford, 1909. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1909-1911: Weeks). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Frank B. Weeks Governor ... I hereby appoint Friday, the twenty-fifth day of March next, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this fourteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord ... Hartford, 1909. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1909-1911: Weeks). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Frank B. Weeks. Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November, as a day of Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this twelfth day of November in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and nine ... Frank B. Weeks. Hartford, 1909. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1909-1911: Weeks). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Frank B. Weeks. Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby appoint Thursday, the 24th day of November, as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this tenth day of November, in the year of our Hartford, 1910. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1911-1915: Baldwin, Simeon). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Simeon E. Baldwin. Governor. A Proclamation... I appoint Friday, the fourteenth day of April next, as a day of fasting and prayer and I recommend the people to use what thus becomes a legal holiday as, in the original sense of that word, a holy-day, to be especially consecrated to the worship and the service of God. Given under my hand ... this twenty-third day of March, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and eleven, and of the independence of the United States, the one hundred and thirty-fifth. Hartford, 1911. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1911-1915: Baldwin, Simeon). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Simeon E. Baldwin Governor. A Proclamation... I appoint Friday, the fifth day of April next, as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this fourteenth day of March, in the year of ... Hartford, 1912. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1911-1915: Baldwin, Simeon). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Simeon E. Baldwin. Governor. A Proclamation... I appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November, as a day of praise and thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this ninth day of November, in ... Hartford, 1912. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1915-1921: Holcomb). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Marcus H. Holcomb Governor A Proclamation... I designate Thursday, November the twenty-fifth, as our yearly day of Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this eleventh day of November, in the yea Hartford, 1920. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1921-1923: Lake). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Everett J. Lake Governor A Proclamation... I hereby designate Friday, the 25th of March, 1921 as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this eighth day of March, in the year of our ... Hartford, 1921. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1921-1923: Lake). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Everett J. Lake Governor A Proclamation... I appoint Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November as a day of thanksgiving... Given under my hand ... this fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord ... Hartford, 1921. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1921-1923: Lake). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Everett J. Lake. A Proclamation... I hereby designate Friday the fourteenth day of April as a day of fasting and prayer ... Given under my hand ... this twenty-first day of March, in the year of ... Hartford, 1922. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1921-1923: Lake). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Everett J. Lake Governor. A Proclamation... I therefore appoint Thursday the thirtieth of November as a day of thanksgiving... Given under my hand ... this sixteenth day of November, in the year of Hartford, 1922. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1923-1925: Templeton). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Charles A. Templeton Governor A Proclamation... I designate Thursday, November the twenty-ninth next as a day of thanksgiving... Given under my hand ... this twelfth day of November, in the year of ... Hartford, 1923. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1925-1931: Trumbull, John H.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency John H. Trumbull governor. A Proclamation... I designate Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this nineteenth day of November, in the ... Hartford, 1928. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1925-1931: Trumbull, John H.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency John H. Trumbull. Governor. A Proclamation... I hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and seal ... this fourteenth day ... Hartford, 1929. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1925-1931: Trumbull, John H.). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency John H. Trumbull Governor. A Proclamation... I designate Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this fourteenth day of November ... Hartford, 1930. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1931-1939: Cross). Thanksgiving Proclamation issued by the governor of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn., November 5, 1931. Hartford, 1931.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1931-1935: Cross). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Wilbur L. Cross Governor A Proclamation... Hartford, 1932. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.
    In accordance with our Connecticut custom to set apart a day, after the harvest, for all to celebrate with fitting rites the bounty of nature and the grace of God shining through the hearts of His children,
    I appoint Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November, as a
    DAY OF PUBLIC THANKSGIVING
    I call upon the people of our State to offer praise on that day in their homes and their churches: for work well and faithfully done, and for rest, which is sweet after toil and care; for justice truly rendered; for the patience and good will of those who have been called upon to endure hardness; for the humanity of those who have shared freely of their means with the needy, and for the kindness of neighbor to neighbor; for the steadfastness of those who have gone before with upright bearing to guide us even to the end of this earthly journey; for the hopes of youth that have been held high against distress and discouragement; for health and peace and all the other blessings that have lightened this land. Let us give thanks together in word and act for these many mercies; and so refreshed once more with the savor of fellowship, let us as members of one family turn to the morrow, taking staff in hand and shouldering our burdens manfully, like the Pilgrim of old on his way to the Celestial City, seeking that which is good in the innermost spirit, and pressing on with new strength to the goal of the common weal.
    Given under my hand and seal of the State at the Capitol, in Hartford, this fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirty-two and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and fifty-seventh.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1931-1935: Cross). [Arms] State of Connecticut. By His Excellency Wilbur L. Cross, Governor: A Proclamation... I therefore appoint Thursday, the 28th of November, as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this fifteenth day of November, in the ... Hartford, 1935. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.

  • Connecticut. Governor (1941-1943: Hurley). State of [Arms] Connecticut. By His Excellency Robert A. Hurley. Governor: A Proclamationpursuant to statutory enactment, I call for the observance of Wednesday, November eleventh, next, as Armistice day in thanksgiving that a war that engulfed Hartford, 1942. 1 sheet; 43 x 28 cm.


    Dakota Territory

  • Dakota Territory. Governor (1866-1869: Faulk). Territory of Dakota. By the governor. A Proclamation. ... Now therefore, I, Andrew J. Faulk ... do hereby appoint Thursday, the 26th day of November as a day of thanksgiving and praise. [Proclamation. 1868]

  • Dakota Territory. Governor (1884-1887: Pierce). Territory of Dakota. Executive office. Bismarck. Nov. 6, 1885. Proclamation to the people of Dakota: In accordance with a long established custom the President of the United States has set apart Thursday, the 26th day of November as a day of National Thanksgiving and gratitude to Almighty God for His manifold blessings during the year. Bismarck, 1885. [Proclamation. 1885]


    Delaware

  • Delaware. President (1778-1781: Rodney). By His Excellency Caesar Rodney, Esq; President, captain-general and commander in chief of the Delaware state, a Proclamation. ... I do therefore appoint Wednesday, the thirtieth day of this instant, December, to be observed as a day of Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and great-seal of said state, at Dover, the seventh day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight Wilmington [Del.]: Printed by James Adams, [1778] 1 sheet; 34 x 21 cm. Also here. ... appoint Wednesday the thirtieth day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving ... Wilmington, 1778. 1 sheet; 34 x 20.5 cm.

  • Delaware. Governor (1778-1781: Rodney). By His excellency Caesar Rodney, Esq; president, captain-general and commander in chief of the Delaware State a proclamation. I do therefore by and with the advice of the privy-council appoint Thursday the sixth day of May next to be observed ...Wilmington, 1779. 1 sheet; 34.5 x 21 cm.

  • Delaware. President (1781-1782: Dickinson). By the President of the Delaware state. A Proclamation. ... I do therefore ... proclaim, that Thursday the twenty-eighth day of November next, be observed throughout this state as a day of solemn Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and the great seal of the state, at New-Castle, the thirty-first day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-two. [Wilmington, Del: Printed by James Adams, 1782] 1 sheet; 33 x 21 cm.

  • Delaware. Governor (1901-1905: Hunn). A proclamation by the governor. Thanksgiving day Delaware 1904. Dover, 1904. 2 pp.; 30 x 22.5 cm.

  • Delaware. Governor (1909-1913: Pennewill). [State of Delaware Executive Chamber Dover. Thanksgiving proclamation]. . Dover, 1910. 3 pp.; 17.5 x 12 cm.

  • Delaware. Governor (1917-1921: Townsend, Jr.). State of Delaware Executive Chamber Dover. Thanksgiving proclamation. Dover, 1920. 5 pp.; 23.5 x 12 cm.

  • Delaware. Governor (1921-1925: Denney). Proclamation State of Delaware, Executive department. Dover, 1922. [Proclamation for Thanksgiving day November the 30th, 1922].

  • Delaware. Governor (1921-1925: Denney). Proclamation State of Delaware, Executive department. Dover, 1923. 1 sheet; 35.5 x 24 cm. [Proclamation for Thanksgiving day Thursday the 29th of November 1923]


    Georgia

  • Georgia (Colony). Resident Trustee (1733-1743: Oglethorpe, James Edward, 1696-1785). Order for thanksgiving to Almighty God, for having put an end to the Spanish invasion, a Proclamation. New-York: Printed and sold by William Bradford, by whom all persons may be supplied with this paper, and where advertisements are taken in, [1742]. 1 sheet ([2] p.); 31 x 19 cm. Also here.


    Illinois

  • Illinois. Governor (1865-1869: Oglesby). Proclamation for a day of thanksgiving and praise, by Richard J. Oglesby, governor of Illinois. ... I do hereby recommend that Thursday, the 29th day of November, be set apart as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand ... at Springfield, this twelfth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six. [Proclamation. 1866 Nov. 12]

  • Illinois. National Lincoln Monument Association. Thanksgiving day. Springfield, Illinois, November 18th, 1869. To the sabbath school and other children: We thank you in the name of the National Lincoln Monument Association, for your prompt and patriotic response tp our circular. Springfield, 1869. 1 sheet; 24.5 x 19 cm.

  • Illinois. Governor (1905-1913: Deneen). Thanksgiving proclamation State of Illinois Charles S. Deneen Governor Nineteen hundred and six. Chicago, 1906. 2 p.; 26.5 x 20 cm. Contains proclamation of Gov. Deneen Nov. 29, 1906 and the proclamation of the President of the U. S.

  • Illinois. Governor (1921-1929: Small). By the Governor of Illinois. A Proclamation... Now, therefore, I Len. Small, Governor of Illinois ... do hereby proclaim and appoint Thursday, the 29th day of November, of this year, to be observed in the State of Illinois as a day of thanksgiving ... Springfield, 1923. 1 sheet; 35.5 x 21.5 cm.


    Iowa

  • Iowa. Governor (1878-1882: Gear). Proclamation for a day of thanksgiving and praise. Davenport Weekly Gazette, November 16, 1881, p. 1, 10th column.
    Kansas

  • Kansas (Territory) Governor (1858-1860: Medary). Thanksgiving proclamation. To the people of Kansas ... given under the seal of the Territory at the City of Lecompton, this 30th day of October, A. D. 1860. By the Governor: S. Medary. Lecompton, 1860.

  • Kansas (State) Governor (1861-1863: Robinson). Thanksgiving proclamation. State of Kansas .... given at the Executive office, Topeka, under my hand the Great Seal of the State, this thirtieth day of October A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. C. Robinson.

  • Kansas (State) Governor (1861-1863: Robinson). Thanksgiving proclamation .... I appoint, Thursday the 27th day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and praise to Almighty God ... given under my hand and seal of the State at Topeka, this 29th day of October, 1862. ... C. Robinson. Topeka, 1862.

  • Kansas (State) Governor (1865-1868: Crawford, S. J.). The state of Kansas. By Samuel J. Crawford, Governor. Thanksgiving proclamation. ... I Samuel J. Crawford, Governor of Kansas, do hereby appoint Thursday, December 7th, A. D. 1865, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer ... given under my hand and ... Topeka, 1865.


    Louisiana

  • Louisiana. Governor (1892-1900: Foster). First proclamation - State of Louisiana. Proclamation announced November 17, 1892. [Baton Rouge, La.?]: Works Progress Administration of Louisiana. Reproduction from Item Tribune, November 24, 1929, Metro p. 3, 6th column.
    Maine

  • Maine (Colony). By Thomas Danforth Esq; president of the province of Mayne, with the consent of the council assembled in York; Octob. [blank] 1682: Wee having taken into our serious consideration the great favour of God, manifested towards his people in this province. [Boston: Printed by Samuel Green, 1682]. 1 sheet.

  • Maine. Governor (1853-1855: Crosby, William G.) By the Governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... I do, therefore, appoint Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next to be observed throughout this State as a day of public thanksgiving and praise. Augusta, 1854.

  • Maine. Governor (1858-1861: Morill, Lot M.). By the Governor. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... I appoint Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Given at the Council Chamber... Augusta, 1858. 1 sheet. [Proclamation. 1858]

  • Maine. Governor (1861-1863: Washburn). By the governor. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, at Augusta, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. [Proclamation. 1862 Oct. 17]

  • Maine. Governor (1864-1867: Cony). By the governor. A Proclamation. ... I have ... appointed Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Given at the Council chamber, Augusta, this nineteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. [Proclamation. 1864 Oct. 19]

  • Maine. Governor (1867-1871: Chamberlain, Joshua L.). By the Governor. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... I do hereby, with the advice of the Executive Council, appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and ... Augusta, 1867.

  • Maine. Governor (1867-1871: Chamberlain, Joshua L.). By the Governor. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... I do hereby ... appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given at the Council Chamber. Augusta, 1868.


    Massachusetts

  • Massachusetts. General Court. At a General Court Held at Boston the 11th of Octob. 1675. Boston, 1675. Broadside.

    "Whereas it hath pleased our gracious God, contrary to the many evill-deservings of an unworthy and sinfull People such as we are, so far to espouse the interest of his poor people, as to plead their Cause with the Heathen in this Wilderness, that have risen up against us, and broken in upon many of our Towns and places as a flood, seeking the utter extirpation and ruine of the interest of our Lord Jesus, in this Wilderness, and that with so considerable a progress, and such strange success, as ought not soon to be forgotten by us: in this day of our calamity, God hath made bare his own Arm for our Deliverance, by taking away courage and Counsel from our enemyes, and giving strange advantages and great success to our selves and Confederates against them, that of those several Tribes and Partyes that have risen up against us, which were not a few, there now scarce remains a Name or Family of them in their former habitations; but are either slain, captivated or fled into remote parts of this wilderness, or lye hid despairing of thir first intentions against us, at least in these parts; unto which mercy, God hath added an abatement of those Epidemical Sicknesses that have attended us most part of this Summer, and vouchsafed us a liberal portion of the fruits of the earth, for our comfortable sustentation [?] and Relief: The joynt consideration of these things ministers great cause, and the same God that is Author of them, can give us hearts to offer our Praise that thereby we may glorifie him. Which that we may obtain,

    "This Court doth appoint and set apart the ninth day of November next to be a Day of solemn Thanksgiving and Praise to God for such his singular and Fatherly Mercyes bestowed on us: and doe commend the same to the respective Elders, Ministers and People of this Jurisdiction, solemnly and seriously to keep the same."

  • Massachusetts. Council. At a Council, held at Charlestown, June the 20th, 1676: The holy God having by a long and continued series of His afflictive dispensations in & by the present warr with the heathen natives of this land ... The Council have thought meet to appoint and set apart the 29th. day of this instant June, as a day of solemn thanksgiving and praise to God. [Cambridge, Mass.: Printed by Samuel Green, 1676]. 1 sheet ([1] p.): ill. (relief cut)

  • Massachusetts. General Court. By the General Court held at Boston, October the tenth, 1677: Whereas the Lords wayes towards his people are often mixt with mercies and judgements ... This court do order, appoint, and set apart, the fifteenth of November next, to be kept a day of thanksgiving unto God. [Cambridge, Mass.: Printed by Samuel Green, 1677] 1 sheet: ill. (relief cut)

  • Massachusetts. General Court. Province of the Massachusetts-Bay, ss. By the Honorable, the Lieutenant Governour, Council and Assembly. A Proclamation for a general thanksgiving: ... this Court doth hereby order and appoint that Thursday the fifteenth of December next, be kept as a day of solemn thanksgiving ... Given at Boston the eighteenth day of November, 1698 .... -- [Boston: Printed by Bartholomew Green and John Allen, 1698] -- 1 sheet: coat of arms; 35 x 21 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1692-1701: Stoughton)By the Governour, June 8, 1692.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1692-1701: Stoughton) Province of the Massachusetts-Bay. By the Honorable the Lieutenant Governour ... the Council & representatives, in General Court assembled ... : This Court being affectionately sensible of the singular providence of God in the early discovery of a most horrid & detestable conspiracy to assassinate the royal person of our most gracious sovereign lord the King ... do therefore appoint and order, that Thursday the eighteenth of June next, be set apart as a day of publick thanksgiving ... Given at the court-house in Boston, May 30th. 1696 .... -- [Boston: Printed by Bartholomew Green and John Allen, 1696] -- 1 sheet: Coat of arms; 31 x 20 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the tenth of December next ... Given at Cambridge the twenty-first day of November, 1702. [Boston: s.n., 1702]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). Province of the Massachusetts-Bay. By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eighteenth day of October next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the 20th. day of September, 1705. [Boston: s.n., 1705]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth of January next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the 27th. day of December 1705 [1706 N.S.]. [Boston: s.n., 1706]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventeenth of October next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the nineteenth day of September, 1706. Boston: Printed by Bartholomew Green, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1706. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eleventh of December next ... Given under my hand at Boston the twenty-fourth day of November 1707. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to His Excellency the governour & Council, 1707. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth of November ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston upon Saturday the fifth of November, 1709. Boston: Printed by Bartholomew Green, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1709. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1702-1715: Dudley). By His Excellency, Joseph Dudley Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the sixteenth of November next ... Given at the council chamber in Boston the twenty-eighth day of October, 1710. [Boston: Printed by Bartholomew Green, 1710]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1716-1727: Shute). By His Excellency, Samuel Shute, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-sixth of October next ... Given at Boston, the eighteenth day of September, 1721. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1721. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1716-1730: Dummer). By the Honourable William Dummer Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-eighth of November ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the sixth day of November, 1723. Boston: Printed by B. Green, [printer to his honour the] lieut. governour and Council, 1723. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1716-1730: Dummer). By the Honourable, William Dummer Esq; lieutenant governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fifth of November next ... Given at Boston the seventeenth of October, 1724. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to His Honour the lieut. governour & Council, 1724. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1728-1729: Burnet). By His Excellency, William Burnet, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventh of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the fifteenth day of October 1728. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to His Excellency the governour & Council, 1728. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq, ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twelfth of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Roxbury the fourteenth day of October 1730. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1730. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-eighth of this instant October ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the fifth day of October 1731. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to his excellency the governour & Council, 1731. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general thanksgiving: ... Thursday the twenty-eighth of this instant October ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the fifth day of October 1731.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-sixth of October next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the twenty-sixth day of September 1732. Boston: Printed by B. Green, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1732. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a publick thanksgiving: ... Thursday the twenty-sixth of October next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the twenty-sixth day of September 1732.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-second of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the thirtieth day of October 1733. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1733. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a publick thanksgiving: ... Thursday the twenty-second of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the thirtieth day of October 1733.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventh day of November next. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1734. 1 sheet. Also here.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a publick thanksgiving: ... Thursday the thirteenth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the eighth day of October 1735. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governour & Council, [1735]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 34 x 21 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick thanksgiving: ... Thursday the seventeenth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Salisbury, the eighteenth day of October 1737. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1737]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general thanksgiving: ... Thursday the twenty-third day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the twenty-eighth day of October 1738. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1738]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the thirteenth day of November next. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1740]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1730-1741: Belcher). By His Excellency Jonathan Belcher, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving..: ... Thursday the thirteenth day of November next.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twelfth of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the fourteenth day of October, 1741. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1741. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eleventh of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston upon Thursday the seventh day of October, 1742. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1742. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the thirteenth of October next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston upon Thursday the twenty-ninth day of September 1743. Boston: Printed by J. Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1743. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-second day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the twentieth day of October, 1744. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1744]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eighteenth day of July instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the eighth day of July 1745. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, 1745. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant-governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fifth day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston the twenty-fifth day of November 1745. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1745]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fourteenth day of August next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-third day of July 1746. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1746]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh of this instant November ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the seventh day of November, 1746. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1746]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-sixth day of November instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the fourth day of November 1747. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1747]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the twenty-ninth day of October 1748. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1748]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth of August instant ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the eighth day of August, 1749. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour and Council, [1749]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the sixteenth of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, upon Friday the twentieth day of October 1749. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his honour the lieut. governour and Council, [1749]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 31 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant-governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the first of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the tenth day of October, 1750 ... Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Honour the lieutenant-governour and Council, [1750]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant-governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the first of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the tenth day of October, 1750 ... Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Honour the lieutenant-governour and Council, [1750]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventh day of November ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the tenth day of October 1751. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his honour the lieutenant-governor and Council, 1751. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 39 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the sixteenth of November next ... Given at Cambridge, the thirteenth day of October, 1752 Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Honour the lieut. governour & Council, 1752. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the first of November ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the ninth day of October 1753 Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governour and Council, 1753. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 39 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1741-1757: Shirley). By His Excellency William Shirley, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-eighth of November instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the second day of November 1754. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governour & Council, 1754. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant-governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fourth day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the fourth day of November 1755. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Honour the lieutenant-governour and Council, 1755. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1732-1757: Phips). By the Honourable Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant-governour ... of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England. A Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth of the present month of November ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the fifth day of November 1756. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Honour the lieutenant-governour and Council, [1756]. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1757-1760: Pownall). By His Excellency Thomas Pownall, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventeenth day of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-seventh day of October, 1757. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governor and the Honorable His Majesty's Council, 1757. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1757-1760: Pownall). By His Excellency Thomas Pownall, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick prayer and Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fourteenth day of September next ... Given at Boston, the twenty-ninth day of August 1758. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governor, and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1758. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 41 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1757-1760: Pownall). By His Excellency Thomas Pownall, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-third day of November instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the fourth day of November, anno domini 1758. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, [1758]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1757-1760: Pownall). By his Excellency Thomas Pownall, Esq; ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of October instant, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston the thirteenth day of October, 1759. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1759. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1757-1760: Pownall). By His Excellency Thomas Pownall, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-ninth day of November instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston the tenth day of November, 1759. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governor and the Honorable His Majesty's Council, 1759. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the ninth day of October next, to be a day of Publick and solemn Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-seventh day of September 1760 Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governor, and the Honorable His Majesty's Council, 1760. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of this instant November ... Given at Boston, the seventh day of November 1760. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governor, and the honorable his majesty's Council, [1760]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the third day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the seventh day of November 1761. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to His Excellency the governor and the Honorable His Majesty's Council, 1761. 1 sheet.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the ninth day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the eleventh day of November, 1762. Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1762. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventh day of October ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-third day of September, 1762 Boston: Printed by John Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1762. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 41 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eleventh day of August next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-seventh day of July, 1763. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1763. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eighth day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the third day of November 1763. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1763. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 41 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-ninth day of November instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston the seventh day of November, 1764. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to the governor and Council, 1764. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 41 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 5th day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the 13th day of November, 1765. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor, and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1765. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth day of this instant July ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the fourth day of July, 1766. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governour, and the honourable his majesty's Council, 1766. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 41 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the sixth day of November, 1766. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governour, and the honourable his majesty's Council, 1766. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the third day of December ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the fourth day of November 1767. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor, and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1767. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 41 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1760-1770: Bernard). By His Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the first day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the third day of November, 1768. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1768. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1758-1771: Hutchinson). By the Honorable Thomas Hutchinson, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the sixteenth day of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-third day of October, 1769. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his honor the lieutenant-governor and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1769. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 40 x 31 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1758-1771: Hutchinson). By the Honorable Thomas Hutchinson, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the sixth day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber in Cambridge, the thirtieth day of October, 1770 Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to His Honor the lieutenant-governor, and the Honorable His Majesty's Council, 1770. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 35 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1771-1774: Hutchinson). Massachusets-Bay [sic]. By the governor. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-first day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, the twenty-third day of October, 1771. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to His Excellency the governor, and the Honorable His Majesty's Council, 1771. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 35 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1771-1774: Hutchinson). Massachusets-Bay [sic]. By the governor. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the third day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-ninth day of October, 1772. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor, and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1772. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 44 x 35 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1771-1774: Hutchinson). Massachusetts-Bay. By the governor. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, the twenty-eighth day of October ... 1773. Boston: Printed by Richard Draper, printer to his excellency the governor, and the honorable his majesty's Council, 1773. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 43 x 35 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Council. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-third day of November instant ... Given under our hands at the Council-chamber, in Watertown, this fourth day of November. Watertown [Mass.]: Printed by Benjamin Edes, printer to the Honorable Council, and House of Representatives, M,DCC,LXXV [1775]. 1 sheet; 43 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Council. Massachusetts-Bay. A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday the twelfth day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber in Boston, this sixteenth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and seventy-six. [Boston: Printed by Benjamin Edes, 1776] 1 sheet; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Council. Massachusetts-Bay. A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer.
    It having pleased Almighty GOD, the Father of Mercies, amidst the Calamities of the present War, is bestow upon this, and the other UNITED AMERICAN STATES, many great and invaluable Blessings,--it becomes a People so highly favour'd of the LORD, especially at the Close of a fruitful Year, to empress their grateful Sense of the divine Goodness, by public THANKSGIVING and PRAISE:
    We have therefore thought fit, with Advice of the Council, and at the Desire of the House of Representatives, to appoint, and do hereby appoint, THURSDAY the Twentieth Day of November next, to be observed as a Day of THANKSGIVING and PRAYER throughout this State; hereby calling upon Ministers and People, of every Denomination, to convene on the said Day, and with humble Devotion, Gratitude and Praise, acknowledge the many Mercies bestowed upon us by our munificent Benefactor; particularly, that he hath, notwithstanding our great Unworthiness, blessed us with Health in our Dwellings, our Army and our Navy; and that the Earth hath yielded her Increase in such uncommon Plenty; and that he hath so far supported us in our Exertions against the arbitrary Claims and military Violence of Britain; and especially in a late Instance of Divine Interposition, in which the Arm of the LORD of Hosts and GOD of Armies very conspicuously appears, hath given us a compleat Victory over a whole Army of our Enemies; hereby teaching us firmly to rely upon Him whose is the Power, and the Glory, and the Victory: That he hath preserv'd the Lives of so many of our Officers and Soldiers, and especially the important Life of our illustrious Commander in Chief; that the Union of the Independent American States is not only preserved, but appears more and more permanent; and above all, that we yet enjoy the glorious Gospel of JESUS CHRIST in meridian Brightness; a Compliance with the reasonable Requisitions of which will introduce us to the Freedom and Felicity of a far better Country.
    AND we hereby recommend to, and enjoin it upon Ministers and People, deeply to abase themselves under a Sense of their Sins and Unworthiness; lamenting the many Offences by which this People have forfeited all Pretensions to the Divine Favor; humbly imploring Foregiveness, through the Merits of JESUS CHRIST our LORD, and that GOD would be pleased, by the Influences of his Spirit, to lead us to the Knowledge and Practice of Truth and Righteousness; that he would inspire our Enemies with the Spirit of that mercifiul Religion they profess; that he would continue to support our righteous Cause, and speedily, if it be his holy Will, establish, on a permanent Basis, our Independence, Peace and Happiness; that America may become for theEquity of itscivil Government, the Purity of its Morals, and the Practice of the Religion of JEWS, the Glory of all Lands, and the Joy of the whole Earth;--that every Species of Tyranny may be abolished from the World, and all Mankind made happy in the Enjoymenht of that Religion which is Righteousness and Peace, and Joy in the Holy Ghost.
    AND all servile Labour is hereby forbidden on the said Day.
    GIVEN at the COUNCIL-CHAMBER in BOSTON, the twentieth day of October, in the Year of our LORD, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven. [Boston: Printed by John Gill, 1777] 1 sheet; 42 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Council. Massachusetts-Bay. A Proclamation. For a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 26th day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber in Boston, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight. [Boston: Printed by Benjamin Edes, 1778] 1 sheet; 43 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Council. A Proclamation: It having pleased Almighty God ... to bestow great and manifold mercies ... Resolved, that it be and hereby is recommended to ... the said states, to appoint Wednesday the thirtieth day of December next ... as a day of public thanksgiving ... Done in Congress this seventeenth day of November, 1778. [Boston: Printed by Benjamin Edes, 1778]. 1 sheet; 43 x 34 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1780-1785: Hancock). By His Excellency John Hancock, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a day of Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the seventh day of December next ... Given at the council-chamber in Boston, the eighth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty [Boston: Printed by Benjamin Edes and Sons, 1780] 1 sheet; 41 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1780-1785: Hancock). By His Excellency John Hancock, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a day of Thanksgiving. ... the thirteenth day of December next (the day recommended by the Congress to all the states) ... Given at the council-chamber in Boston the twenty second day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty one [Boston: Printed by Benjamin Edes and Sons?, 1781] 1 sheet; 52 x 38 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1780-1785: Hancock). By His Excellency John Hancock, Esq; ... A Proclamation. For a day of Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-eighth day of November instant, (the day recommended by Congress to all the states) ... Given at the council-chamber in Boston, the fourth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-two [Boston: Printed by Edward Eveleth Powars, 1782] 1 sheet; 40 x 31 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1780-1785: Hancock). By His Excellency John Hancock, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a day of Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the eleventh day of December next (the day recommended by the Congress to all the states) ... Given at the council-chamber in Boston, the eighth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty three [Boston: Printed by Adams and Nourse, 1783] 1 sheet; 42 x 33 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1780-1785: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the twenty-eighth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four [Boston: Printed by Adams and Nourse, 1784]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut) ; 42 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1785-1787: Bowdoin). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency James Bowdoin, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the fifteenth day of December next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the seventh day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five [Boston: Printed by Adams and Nourse, 1785]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut) ; 51 x 38 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1785-1787: Bowdoin). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency James Bowdoin, Esq. ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the fourteenth day of December next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the third day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six [Boston: Printed by Adams and Nourse, 1786] 1 sheet; 51 x 39 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1786-1788: Sullivan) By His Excellency John Sullivan, Esquire, president of the state of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation, for a general thanksgiving... Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by Lamson and Ranlet., 1786. 1 sheet; 37 x 32 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation, for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the twenty-fifth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven Boston: Printed by Adams and Nourse, printers to the honourable the General Court, [1787]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 48 x 39 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation, for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, this twenty-ninth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight Boston: --Printed by Adams & Nourse, printers to the honourable the General Court, [1788]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 47 x 37 cm.

    "In circumstances as dark as these, it becomes us, as Men and Christians, to reflect that whilst every prudent measure should be taken to ward off the impending judgments, --at the same time all confidence must be withheld from the means we use; and reposed only on that God rules in the armies of Heaven, and without His whole blessing, the best human counsels are but foolishness? Resolved; --Thursday the 11th of May--to humble themselves before God under the heavy judgments felt and feared, to confess the sins that have deserved them, to implore the Forgiveness of all our transgressions, and a spirit of repentance and reformation --and a Blessing on the Union of the American Colonies in Defense of their Rights [for which hitherto we desire to thank Almighty God]--That the people of Great Britain and their rulers may have their eyes opened to discern the things that shall make for the peace of the nation--for the redress of America's many grievances, the restoration of all her invaded liberties, and their security to the latest generations."

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation, for a day of Thanksgiving. Having received from the President of the United States, the following Proclamation ... I do therefore ... appoint Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, this fourteenth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine Boston: --Printed by Adams & Nourse, printers to the honourable General Court, [1789]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut) ; 51 x 41 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the sixteenth day of September ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety Printed at Boston: by Thomas Adams, printer to the honorable General Court of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, [1790]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 51 x 40 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the seventeenth of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the fifth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-one Printed at Boston: by Thomas Adams, printer to the honorable General Court of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, [1791]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 51 x 40 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the twenty-fifth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two. Printed at Boston, Massachusetts, at the State Press: by Thomas Adams, printer to the honourable the General Court, [1792]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 51 x 40 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1787-1793: Hancock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Hancock, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the seventh day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the twenty-eighth day of September ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three. Printed at Boston, Massachusetts, at the State Press: by Adams & Larkin, printers to the General Court, [1793]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 51 x 40 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1794-1797: Adams). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By the Governor: A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving, Thursday, the twentieth of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the fifteenth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four [Boston]: Printed at the State Press, by Adams and Larkin, printers to the honorable General Court of this commonwealth, [1794]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 51 x 41 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1794-1797: Adams). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By the Governor: A Proclamation. For a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the nineteenth day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, the fourteenth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five. [Boston]: Printed at the State Press, by Adams and Lakkin [i.e., Larkin], printers to the honourable General Court of this commonwealth, [1795]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 51 x 41 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1794-1797: Adams). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By the governor, a Proclamation, for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fifteenth day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber, in Boston, this sixth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six [Boston]: Young & Minns, state printers, [1796]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut) ; 57 x 46 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1797-1799: Sumner). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Increase Sumner, Esquire ... a Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the thirtieth of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-third day of October ... one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-seven [Boston]: Printed by Young and Minns, state printers, [1797]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 56 x 46 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1797-1799: Sumner). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Increase Sumner, Esq. ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth of November next ... Given at the council chamber in Boston, this twenty-third day of October ... one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-eight [Boston: Printed by Young and Minns, 1798]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 56 x 46 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Lieutenant Governor (1799-1800: Gill). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Honor Moses Gill, Esq'r. ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next ... Given at the council chamber in Boston, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine [Boston: Printed by Young and Minns, 1799]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 56 x 46 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1800-1807: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong, Esquire ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next ... Given at the council-chamber, in Boston, this twenty-sixth day of September ... one thousand and eight hundred [Boston: Printed by Young and Minns, 1800]. 1 sheet. ill. (relief cut); 56 x 45 cm.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1800-1807: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong, Esqr. ... A Proclamation for a day of publick thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this fifteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and one. [Boston: s.n., 1801] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1801 Oct. 15]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1800-1807: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong, Esq. ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber, in Boston, this twenty-second day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and two. [Proclamation. 1802 Oct. 22]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1800-1807: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and five. [Boston: s.n., 1805] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1805 Oct. 17]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1807-1808: Sullivan). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency James Sullivan, Esq., Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the Commonwealth aforesaid: a Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving and praise throughout the Commonwealth ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of next November ... Given at the Council-chamber, this sixteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seven. [Boston: s.n.], 1807. 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1807 Oct. 16]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1807-1808: Sullivan). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency James Sullivan, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of public fasting and prayer. ... Thursday, the seventh day of next April ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this fourth day of February ... one thousand eight hundred and eight. [Proclamation. 1808 Feb. 4]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1807-1808: Sullivan). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency James Sullivan, Esq., Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the commonwealth aforesaid, A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise, throughout the commonwealth. ... Thursday, the first day of December next ... Given at the Council-chamber, in Boston this ninth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and eight. [Boston: s.n., 1808] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1808 Nov. 9]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1809-1810: Gore). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Christopher Gore, governor and commander in chief, a Proclamation, for a day of Publick Thanksgiving and praise throughout the state. ... Thursday the thirtieth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand sight hundred and nine [Boston]: Russell and Cutler, printers, [1809] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1809 Oct. 17]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1810-1812: Gerry). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Elbridge Gerry, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving, praise, and prayer. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council Chamber, in Boston, this twenty-fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and ten. [Boston: s.n., 1810] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1810 Oct. 24]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1810-1812: Gerry). By His Excellency Elbridge Gerry, Governor of the commonwealth, a Proclamation, for a day of Publick Thanksgiving, praise, and prayer. [Boston: s.n., 1811] 1 broadside.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1810-1812: Gerry). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Elbridge Gerry ... A Proclamation, for a day of public fasting, humiliation, and prayer. ... Thursday, the eleventh day of April next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, the thirteenth day of March ... one thousand, eight hundred, and eleven. [Proclamation. 1811 Mar. 13]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1810-1812: Gerry). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Elbridge Gerry, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving, praise, and prayer. ... Thursday, the twenty-first of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston this twenty-second day of October, ... one thousand eight hundred and eleven. [Proclamation. 1811 Oct. 22]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1810-1812: Gerry). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Elbridge Gerry, Esq. ... A Proclamation, for a day of public fasting, humiliation, and prayer. ... Thursday, the ninth of April next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston the sixth day of March ... one thousand eight hundred and twelve. [Proclamation. 1812 Mar. 6]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1812-1816: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong ... a Proclamation, for a day of publick thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this thirteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twelve. 1 sheet ([1] p.) ill. (relief cut) 57 x 46 cm. [Proclamation. 1812 Oct. 13]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1812-1816: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong ... A Proclamation, for a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer. ... Thursday, the eighth day of April next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this thirteenth day of February ... one thousand eight hundred and thirteen. [Proclamation. 1813 Feb. 13]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1812-1816: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong ... a Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this eighth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirteen. 1 sheet ([1] p.) ill. (relief cut) 57 x 47 cm. [Proclamation. 1813 Oct. 8]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1812-1816: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong ... a Proclamation, for a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer. ... Thursday, the seventh day of April next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this eighth day of February ... one thousand eight hundred and fourteen. [Proclamation. 1814 Feb. 8]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1812-1816: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong ... a Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday, the first day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this eleventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fourteen. [Proclamation. 1814 Oct. 11]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1812-1816: Strong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Caleb Strong, Governor of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, the twenty-fifth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifteen. [Boston: s.n., 1815] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1815 Oct. 25]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1816-1823: Brooks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Brooks ... A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer Thursday, the fourth day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-ninth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventeen. / by John Brooks Boston: Russell Cutler & Co., printers, 1817. 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1817 Oct. 29]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1816-1823: Brooks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Brooks ... a Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the third day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this thirteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and eighteen. [Boston]: Russell & Gardner, printers, [1818] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1818 Oct. 13]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1816-1823: Brooks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Brooks ... a Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving & prayer. ... Thursday, the second day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, the eighteenth day of October ... eighteen hundred and nineteen. [Boston: s.n., 1819] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1819 Oct. 18]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1816-1823: Brooks).Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Brooks ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty third day of November current ... [Proclamation. 1820 Nov. 1]
    ... AND while we unite in attempting to render our sincere Thanksgiving to God for the distinguishing marks of His providential kindness, may we be duly sensible of our ingratitude to Him. and of our guilty misuse of the parental tokens of His love and munificence. imploring the remission of all our transgressions through the redemption that there is in Jesus Christ: That we may love our Father in Heaven with more sincerity, imitate the Great Saviour of men more closely, and exercise the duties of benevolence and charity, with deeper affection and more heart felt zeal.
    That God will be pleased to regard with His favor the interests of this State as connected with the administration of the several departments of government, and that He will lead us in all our solemn and interesting discussions of the great principles of our Constitution, to such result as shall ensure our own peace and happiness, and to transmit to our children, to the latest generations, the blessings of a wise and free Constitution of Government: That He will be pleased to bless our nation in all its important interests, to guide its councils, to preserve it in peace and to exalt by righteousness: That He will graciously smile on the means of education, on the cause of truth, on the interests of religion, and on the Ministers of the Prince of Peace: And that He will cause the light of the Gospel to illuminate, reform, and bless the whole family of man.
    AND it is recommended to the people that they abstain from all labor, and recreations inconsistent with the religious devotion of tbe said day.
    Given at the Council Chamber, in Boston, this First Day of November, in the Year of our Lord Eighteen Hundred and Twenty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the Forty Fifth.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1816-1823: Brooks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Brooks ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. Thursday, the sixth day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twelfth day of October ... eighteen hundred and twenty one. [Boston: Printed by Russell & Gardner, 1821. 1 sheet ([1] p.): ill. (relief cut); 59 x 48 cm. Signed: John Brooks. By his excellency the governor, with the advice and consent of the Council. Alden Bradford, secretary./ Relief cut of Massachusetts seal was used regularly by John Russell and Simon Gardner, state printers./ Text in two columns; printed area measures 49.5 x 38.7 cm./[Proclamation. 1821 Oct. 12]
    THE unceasing exercise of the benevolence of Almighty God. toward his rational creatures, of which the people of this State so largely participate, ought to produce in us the most cordial returns of gratitude, as well as a suitable sense of onr dependence on Him for all the enjoyments of this, and the hopes of a better, life. The uncommon blessings which the present season has brought with it, have corresponding claims on us for expressions of devout Praise and Thanksgiving:
    I HAVE, therefore, tbought fit to appoint, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Council, in conformity to the pious practice of our revered Forefathers, I do hereby appoint THURSDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF DECEMBER NEXT, to be observed as a DAY OF THANKSGIVING AND PRAYER, throughout the Commonwealth. And the people of every religious denomination are requested to assemble in their respective places of public worship on that day,unitedly to offer to the Divine Bestower of all our blessings the humble sacrifice of Thanksgiving and Praise: That He hath, in the course of the present year, preserved among the people of this State an unusual degree of health, of tranqnility and good fellowship: That our moral, religious and social enjoyments, and our civil and political privileges have been continued to us: That our nation, now on terms of amity with all other nations, is fast recovering from the paralizing effects of war: That our agriculture, manufactures, and commerce, are in a state of progressive and hopeful improvement: That the seasons of the year have been ordered in mnch mercy, so that our fields have yielded a rich increase, and we have an abundant supply of the fruits of the earth, and the productions of the sea.
    AND while we render to God our grateful tribute of praise, for the various blessings with which He has heen pleased so freely to indulge us, may have been led duly to realize our own unworthiness, and the great abuse with which we are chargeable, of many of the distinguishing tokens of his goodness; and penitently seek to him for the remission of all our transgressions "through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus" That He will be pleased to bless the people of the Commonwealth in their Government, in their Schools and Colleges, in their literary, moral and religious Instructors, and in all their institutions for promoting piety, charity and beneficence; and that finally the religion of the Gospel of Jesus Christ may be universally spread through the world, that the whole earth may he filled witb the glory of God.
    AND it is recommended to the people, that they abstain from all labor and recreation inconsistent with the religious services of the day.

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1823-1825: Eustis).Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William Eustis ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday, the twentieth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this eighteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty three. [Proclamation. 1823 Oct. 18]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five. [Proclamation. 1825 Oct. 21]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this eighteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty six. [Proclamation. 1826 Oct. 18]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven. [Proclamation. 1827 Oct. 17]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this twentieth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight. [Proclamation. 1828 Oct. 20]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this nineteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty nine. [Proclamation. 1829 Oct. 19]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the second day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this twentieth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty. [Proclamation. 1830 Oct. 20]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the first day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one. [Proclamation. 1831 Oct. 17]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this nineteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two. [Proclamation. 1832 Oct. 19]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1825-1834: Lincoln, Jr.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Levi Lincoln ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this nineteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three. [Proclamation. 1833 Oct. 19]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1834-1835: Davis). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Davis ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four. [Proclamation. 1834 Oct. 1]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1835-1836: Armstrong). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Honor Samuel T. Armstrong ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the third day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this third day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five. [Proclamation. 1835 Oct. 3]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1836-1840: Everett). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Edward Everett ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the first day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six. [Proclamation. 1836 Oct. 1]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1836-1840: Everett). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Edward Everett ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this second day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven.[Proclamation. 1837 Oct. 2]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1836-1840: Everett). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Edward Everett ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this twenty-eighth day of September ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight. [Proclamation. 1838 Sept. 28]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1836-1840: Everett). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Edward Everett ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-seventh day of September ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine. [Proclamation. 1839 Sept. 27]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1840-1841: Morton). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Marcus Morton ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and forty.[Proclamation. 1840 Oct. 1]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1841-1843: Davis). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Davis ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fourty-one. 1 sheet. ill. 60 x 50 cm. [Proclamation. 1841 Oct. 1]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1841-1843: Davis). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John Davis ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Boston, this sixteenth day of September ... one thousand eight hundred and fourty-two. 1 sheet. ill. 61 x 50 cm. [Proclamation. 1842 Sept. 16]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1841-1843: Morton). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Marcus Morton ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-second day of September ... one thousand eight hundred and forty-three. [Proclamation. 1843 Sept. 22]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1853-1854: Clifford). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, John H. Clifford ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this seventeenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three. [Proclamation. 1853 Oct. 17]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1854-1855: Washburn, Emory). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Emory Washburn ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November current ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this first day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four. [Proclamation. 1854 Nov. 1]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1855-1858: Gardner). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Henry J. Gardner, ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-third day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five. [Proclamation. 1855 Oct. 23]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1855-1858: Gardner). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Henry J. Gardner ... A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-ninth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six. [Proclamation. 1856 Oct. 29]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1855-1858: Gardner). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency, Henry J. Gardner, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-ninth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven. [Proclamation. 1857 Oct. 29]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1858-1861: Banks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Nathaniel P. Banks, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight. [Proclamation. 1858 Oct. 27]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1858-1861: Banks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Nathaniel P. Banks, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-eighth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred any [sic] fifty-nine. [Proclamation. 1859 Oct. 28]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1858-1861: Banks). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Nathaniel P. Banks, governor. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, this twenty-sixth day of October, in the year one thousand and sixty. [Proclamation. 1860 Oct. 26]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1861-1866: Andrew). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John A. Andrew, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 21st day November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this thirty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. [Proclamation. 1861 Oct. 31]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1861-1866: Andrew). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John A. Andrew, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 27th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. [Proclamation. 1862 Oct. 27]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1861-1866: Andrew). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John A. Andrew, governor: A Proclamation. Whereas the President of the United States ... set apart Thursday, the sixth day of August next to be observed as a day for national thanksgiving, praise and prayer ... I do therefore direct and request that the aforesaid Proclamation ... be published and promulgated to the people of Massachusetts in the same manner in which the Proclamation of the governor of Massachusetts is accustomed to be promulgated ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-seventh day of July ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. [Proclamation. 1863 July 27]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1861-1866: Andrew). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John A. Andrew, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 26th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three.[Proclamation. 1863 Oct. 1]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1861-1866: Andrew). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John A. Andrew, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 24th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this thirty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. [Proclamation. 1864 Oct. 31]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1861-1866: Andrew). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency John A. Andrew, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 7th day of December next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this eighth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five.[Proclamation. 1865 Nov. 8]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1866-1869: Bullock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Alexander H. Bullock, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 29th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twelfth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six. [Proclamation. 1866 Oct. 12]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1866-1869: Bullock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Alexander H. Bullock, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this eighteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven. [Proclamation. 1867 Oct. 18]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1866-1869: Bullock). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Alexander H. Bullock, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth of November next ... Given at the Council Chamber, in Boston, this fourteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight. [Proclamation. 1868] Oct. 14]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1869-1872: Claflin). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William Claflin, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the eighteenth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this fifteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine. [Proclamation. 1869 Oct. 15]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1869-1872: Claflin). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William Claflin, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-fifth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy. [Proclamation. 1870 Oct. 25]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1869-1872: Claflin). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William Claflin, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the thirtieth of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one. [Proclamation. 1871 Oct. 27]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1872-1874: Washburn, William B.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William B. Washburn, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 28th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this fifteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two. [Proclamation. 1872 Oct. 15]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1872-1874: Washburn, William B.). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William B. Washburn, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 27th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this fifteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three. [Proclamation. 1873 Oct. 15]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1874-1875: Talbot). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Honor Thomas Talbot, lieutenant-governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 26th day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this twenty-sixth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-four. [Proclamation. 1874 Oct. 26]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1875-1876: Gaston). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William Gaston, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 25th day of November current ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this fifth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five. [Proclamation. 1875 Nov. 5]

  • Massachusetts. Governor (1876-1879: Rice) Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency Alexander H. Rice, governor: a Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the thirtieth day of November, instant ... Given at the Council chamber, in Boston, this first day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six ... [Boston: Printed by Wright & Potter, 1876. 1 sheet ([1] p.) ill.; 70 x 48 cm.
    Minnesota

  • Minnesota. (State) Governor (1860-1863: Ramsey). Thanksgiving day. Proclamation by Alexander Ramsey, governor of the state of Minnesota. ... I respectfully recommend to the people of Minnesota to observe in their own way, the last Thursday, the 29th of November next, as a day of praise and thanksgiving. ... In witness whereof I have hereunto signed my name ... at the city of St. Paul, this 23d day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty. [Proclamation. 1860 Oct. 23]

  • Minnesota. (State) Governor (1860-1863: Ramsey). Proclamation by Alexander Ramsey, governor of the state of Minnesota. In accordance with usage, I respectfully recommend to the people of this state, that Thursday, the tweny-eighth [sic] day of ... November, be set apart and observed as a day of solumn thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and the great seal of the state, at the city of St. Paul, this eighth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. [Proclamation. 1861 Nov. 8]


    Missouri

  • Missouri (State) Governor (1865-1869: Fletcher). The State of Missouri. By the Governor. Proclamation. ... I hereby designate Thursday, the seventh day of December, proximo to be observed in the State of Missouri as a day of public thanksgiving and devout remembrance ... at the City of Jefferson ... Jefferson, 1865. 1 sheet; 25.5 x 20.5 cm.


    Nevada

  • Nevada. Governor (1864-1871: Blasdel). Thanksgiving Proclamation by His Excellency, H.G. Blasdel, governor of Nevada. ... I do hereby appoint and proclaim Thursday, the 7th day of December next, as a day on which the people of Nevada may and ought to join ... in public thanksgiving ... Done at Carson City, this 17th day of November, A.D. 1865. [Proclamation. 1865 Nov. 17]

  • Nevada. Governor (1864-1871: Blasdel). Proclamation by the governor, for a day of public thanksgiving. ... I recommend that Thursday, the 28th instant, be set apart and appropriately observed as a day of special thanksgiving ... Done at Carson City, this the 14th day of November, A.D. 1867. [Proclamation. 1867 Nov. 14]

  • Nevada. Governor, acting (1868-1871: Slingerland). Thanksgiving Proclamation. ... I, the acting governor of the state of Nevada, do hereby appoint and set apart, as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, Thursday, the 26th day of November, A.D. 1868. ... Done at Carson City, this the 23d day of October, A.D. 1868. [Proclamation. 1868 Oct. 23]


    New Hampshire

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire[.] By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 25th day of November ... Given at the Council chamber in Portsmouth the [illegible] day of November, in the 30th year of His Majesty's reign, annoque Domini, 1750. [Boston?: s.n., 1750] 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving, for the success of His Majesty's arms. ... Saturday the tenth of this instant November ... Given at the Council chamber in Portsmouth the 4th day of November, 1759. Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by Daniel Fowle, [1759]. 1 sheet; 33 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq. It having been His Majesty's pleasure to signify his commands to me, that his Royal Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving should be solemnized and kept in all His Majsety's colonies in America ... I have therefore thought fit to cause His Majesty's said Proclamation to be herewith printed, and to appoint Thursday the thirteenth day of March to be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this province ... Given at Portsmouth the twenty-eighth day of February, one thousand seven hundred and sixty Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by Daniel Fowle, [1760]. 1 sheet; 39 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday the third day of December next, shall be observed and kept, as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, November the 24th, 1761. Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by D. Fowle, [1761]. 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. His Majesty having been pleased to signify his Royal pleasure, that a Publick Thanksgiving, should be observed in his American colonies, on the happy conclusion of the peace. ... Thursday, the eleventh of August, shall be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, the 28th day of July, in the third year of His Majesty's reign, 1763. [Portsmouth, N.H: Printed by D. Fowle, 1763] 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth of this instant November, be religiously observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth November the 9th. 1763 Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by D, Fowle, [1763]. 1 sheet; 38 x 30 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving: ... Thursday the eighth day of November next, be religiously observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council chamber in Portsmouth, the 29th day of October, 1764. [Portsmouth: Printed by Daniel Fowle?, 1764] 1 sheet; 37 x 30 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1741-1766: Wentworth). By His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the fourteenth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber in Portsmouth, the 29th day of October, 1765 Portsmouth, in New-Hampshire: Printed by Daniel and Robert Fowle, printers to his excellency the governor and Council, [1765]. 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). By His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the nineteenth instant, be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber at Portsmouth, this 3d day of November 1767. Portsmouth: Printed by Daniel & Robert Fowle, [1767] 1 sheet; 37 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). By His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 24th day of November next shall be religiously observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council chamber in Portsmouth, this twenty sixth day of October ... Annoque Domini, 1768. Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by Daniel & Robert Fowle, [1768] 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire. By His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-third day of November next, be religiously and devoutly observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, the 25th day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and sixty nine. [Portsmouth, N.H: Printed by Daniel & Robert Fowle, 1769] 1 sheet; (1/2$)

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire. By His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 6th day of December next, be solemnly and religiously observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, the 6th day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and seventy. [Portsmouth, N.H: s.n., 1770] 1 sheet; 39 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire. By His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty first day of November next, be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, the thirtieth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and seventy one. [Portsmouth, N.H: Printed by Daniel and Robert Fowle, 1771] 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire, by His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the third day of December next, to be religiously observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth the third day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and seventy two. [Portsmouth, N.H: Printed by Daniel and Robert Fowle, 1772] 1 sheet; 39 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire, by His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth of this instant November, to be religiously observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, the 3d day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and seventy three. [Portsmouth, N.H: Printed by Daniel and Robert Fowle, 1773] 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1767-1775: Wentworth). Province of New-Hampshire, by His Excellency John Wentworth, Esq; ... A Proclamation, for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fourth of November instant ... Given at the Council-chamber in Portsmouth, the first day of November ... 1774. [Portsmouth, N.H: Printed by Daniel and Robert Fowle, 1774] 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Provincial Congress. In Congress, Exeter Nov. 4, 1775. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 30th of this instant November, be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout the colony. [Exeter, N.H: Printed by Robert Luist Fowle, 1775]. 1 sheet; 30 x 19 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Council. New-Hampshire. A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty first day of November next, to be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at Exeter the 19th day of October, 1776. By order of the Council and Assembly. Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by R. L. Fowle, 1776. 1 sheet; 40 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Council. State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation, for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the fourth day of December next ... By order of the Council and Assembly. Exeter, November 17th, 1777. Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by Zechariah Fowle, June, 1777. 1 sheet.

    It being the united voice of reason and revelation that men should praise the Lord for his goodness and his wonderful works to the children of men, and the year now drawing to a close being distinguished by many great and signal favors of Divine Providence conferred on this and the other United States of America, amidst our deep distress; now, in order that our Great and Bountiful Benefactor may have the praise and glpry due for his mercies in the most conspicuous and solemn manner ascribed to Him,
    The COUNCIL and representatives of this state, in general court assembled, have appointed the 4th day of December next to be a day of public thanksgiving throughout this state; and we hereby solemnly exhort and require both ministers and people of every profession religiously to devote the said day to the purpose aforesaid, and with unfeigned gratitude to address the allgracious Jehovah with their united ascriptions of praise for his great goodness, and for his rich mercy he hath intermixed with his judgments, particularly that He hath so far supported the great American cause, and defeated the merciless counsels and efforts of our cruel oppressors; that He hath smiled on our deliberations and arms, and crowned them with signal success, especially in the Northern Department, in turning the advantages the enemy seemed to have acquired against us, by possessing themselves of the fortress of Ticonderoga, to their own confusion, and giving one of the principal armies of Britain wholly into our hands with so little bloodshed, in which great event, so interesting to the important cause depending, the arm of the Lord of Hosts, the God of the Armies of Israel was conspicuously manifest, demanding the power, the glory, and victory to be ascribed to Him; and inviting our further hope and confidence in this mercy, that He hath preserved our sea-coast in safety, preserved the inestimable precious life of our worthy general and commander-in-chief, and so many of our officers and soldiers; and that the present campaign, prosecuted by our enemies with such direful breathings of cruelty and slaughter, and such strenuous exertions on one side and another hath not become more bloody; that He is mercifully continuing the several American states firmly united in the common cause, and giving us such a promising, animating prospect of being able, by his further help, finally to support our liberty and independence against all the power and policy of Britain to subject and enslave us; that He hath blessed us with so much health in our camps, and in our habitations, whereby we have been able to carry on the necessary labors of the field, while so many were called off to arms; that He hath blessed us with a very fruitful season, and given us in great plenty the precious productions of the earth for food and clothing, peculiarly precious at a time when our imports from abroad are chiefly cut off, and, therefore, binding the duty of gratitude and praise upon us with increased obligation: and above all, that, in the greatness of his forbearance and long-suffering, He is yet continuing to us, though an unthankful and unfruitful people, the blessed Gospel of Jesus Christ, and our religious liberty and privileges, by which we enjoy the happiest advantages for glorifying our Creator and Redeemer, and securing our eternal well being.
    All servile LABOUR is forbidden on said day.
    In the house of representatives, November 19, 1777. The aforesaid form of proclamation for a general thanksgiving being read, voted that the same be transcribed, printed, and dispersed throughout the state.
    JOHN LANGDON, Speaker.
    Sent up for concurrence.
    In council the same day read and concurred.
    E. THOMPSON, Secretary.

  • New Hampshire. Council. State of New-Hampshire: the council and assembly of said state, have ordered, -- that the following Proclamation of the Hon'ble Continental Congress ... be printed ... M. Weare, president of the Council ... a Proclamation for a gerneral thanksgiving, throughout the United-States of America: in Congress, November 1, 1777 ... Cha. Thompson, secretary ... Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by Zechariah Fowle, 1777. Broadside; 40 x 30 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Committee of Safety. State of New-Hampshire. In Committee of Safety, Exeter, November 1, 1782. Ordered, that the following Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving on the twenty-eighth day of November instant, received from the honorable Continental Congress, be forthwith printed. Printed at Exeter: [s.n., 1782] 1 sheet; 34 x 21 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Committee of Safety. State of New-Hampshire. In Committee of Safety, Exeter, Nov. 14th, 1783. Whereas the honorable Continental Congress have recommended that the second Thursday in December next, be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout the United States: ordered, that the following Proclamation ... be forthwith printed ... and that the said day be accordingly observed throughout this state. Printed at Exeter, [N.H: by Zechariah Fowle], 1783. 1 sheet; 44 x 34 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1784-1785: Weare). State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving throughout the state. ... Thursday the second day of December next, to be a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber, in Portsmouth, the second day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four [Exeter, N.H: Printed by Melcher & Osborne, 1784] 1 sheet; 40 x 30 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1785-1786: Langdon). By His Excellency John Langdon, Esquire, President of the state of New-Hampshire: a Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the 24th day of November, next, to be observed and kept as a day of general Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Concord, this twenty-first day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five. Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by Melcher and Osborne, 1785. 1 sheet; 41 x 33 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1785-1786: Langdon). A Proclamation for a general thanksgiving, Thursday the 24th day of November, next, to be observed and kept as a day of general thanksgiving, Given at the Council-chamber in Concord, this twenty-first day of October, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five. By His Excellency John Langdon, Esquire, President of the state of New-Hampshire. Portsmouth [N.H.]: Printed by Melcher and Osborne, 1785. 1 sheet; 41 x 33 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1786-1788: Sullivan). By His Excellency John Sullivan, Esquire, President of the state of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation, for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-third of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick and solemn Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber at Exeter, this twenty-sixth day of September ... one thousand, seven hundred and eighty-six. Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by Lamson and Ranlet, [1786]. 1 sheet; 37 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1788-1789: Langdon). By His Excellency John Langdon, Esquire, captain-general and commander in chief in and over the state of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber at Portsmouth, the tenth day of October, anno Domini, one thousand, seven hundred and eighty eight. Portsmouth, N.H: s.n., [1788]. 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. A Proclamation for a general thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-seventh day of November next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving, Given at the Council-chamber at Portsmouth, the tenth day of October, anno Domini, one thousand, seven hundred and eighty eight. By His Excellency John Langdon, Esquire, captain-general and commander in chief in and over the state of New-Hampshire. [Portsmouth, N.H.: s.n., [1788]. 1 sheet ([1] p.); 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1786-1788: Sullivan) By His Excellency John Sullivan, Esquire, captain-general and commander in chief, in and over the state of Newhampshire. A Proclamation for a general thanksgiving... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber, at Portsmouth, the twenty eighth day of September ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine ... Signed: John Sullivan. By His Excellency's command--with advice of Council: Joseph Pearson, secretary. Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by Henry Ranlet, 1789. 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. President (1789-1790: Sullivan). By His Excellency John Sullivan, Esquire, captain-general and commander in chief, in and over the state of Newhampshire. A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber, at Portsmouth, the twenty eighth day of September ... one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine Exeter [N.H.]: Printed by Henry Ranlet, [1789] 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1793-1794: Bartlett). By His Excellency Josiah Bartlett, Esquire, President of the state of Newhampshire. A Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of November next ... Given at the Council-chamber, in Exeter, this thirteenth day of October ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety. Printed at Exeter [N.H.]: by Henry Ranlet, [1790]. 1 sheet; 39 x 32 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1793-1794: Bartlett). Proclamation - Thanksgiving Day - 1793, New Hampshire. This is the text of a proclamation by Josiah Bartlett (Signer of the Declaration of Independence), governor of New Hampshire, given on October 5, 1793. It declares November 21, 1793 to be a day of Public Thanksgiving. This proclamation was published in The Oracle of the Day on October 26, 1793. [Proclamation 10/05/1793]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1794-1805: Gilman). By His Excellency John Taylor Gilman, governor of the state of New-Hampshire; a Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving. ... The legislature have appointed Thursday the thirteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council-chamber in Exeter, this, 29th day of September ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four State of New-Hampshire: Portsmouth: Printed by John Melcher, printer to the state, 1794. 1 sheet; 39 x 33 cm.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1805-1809: Langdon). By the Governor, a Proclamation. New Hampshire, 1805. 1 broadside.

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1819-1823: Bell, Samuel). State of New-Hampshire. By the governor, A Proclamation, for a day of thanksgiving. ... Thursday the ninth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber at Concord the seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty. [Proclamation. 1820 Oct. 7]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1819-1823: Bell, Samuel). State of New-Hampshire. By the governor. A Proclamation for a day of thanksgiving. ... Thursday the twenty-eighth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber at Concord, this twenty-eighth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two. [Proclamation. 1822 Oct. 28]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1824-1827: Morril). State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation, for a day of thanksgiving, prayer and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-third day of November next ... Dated at Goffstown, the twenty-ninth day of September ... one thousdand eight hundred and twenty-six. [Proclamation. 1826 Sept. 29]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1827-1828: Pierce). State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation, for a day of publick thanksgiving and prayer. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given at Hillsborough, this eighteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven. [Proclamation. 1827 Oct. 18]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1829-1830: Pierce)State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next ... Given at Hillsborough, this sixteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine. [Proclamation. 1829 Oct. 16]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1839-1842: Page). State of New Hampshire. By the governor. A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 25th day of November next ... Given at Haverhill, this 12th day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and forty-one. [Proclamation. 1841 Oct. 12]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1842-1844: Hubbard). State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the 22nd day of December next ... Given at the council chamber at Concord, this twenty-second day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and forty-two. [Proclamation. 1842 Nov. 22]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1855-1857: Metcalf). State of New Hampshire. A Proclamation for a day of thanksgiving and praise: by the governor. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November inst., to be observed throughout this state as a day of prayer, praise and thanksgiving to God ... Given at the Council chamber, in Concord, this first day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five. [Proclamation. 1855 Nov. 1]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1857-1859: Haile). State of New Hampshire. A Proclamation: by the governor. ... Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next, to be observed throughout the state as a day of thanksgiving and praise. ... Given at the Council chamber, in Concord, this twenty-ninth day of September ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight. [Proclamation. 1858 Sept. 29]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1859-1861: Goodwin). State of New Hampshire. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. By His Excellency, Ichabod Goodwin, governor. ... Thursday, the 24th of November ... Given at the Council chamber, in Concord, this twentieth day of September ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine. [Proclamation. 1859 Sept. 20]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1859-1861: Goodwin). The State of New-Hampshire. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. By His Excellency, Ichabod Goodwin. ... Thursday, the 29th of November ... Given at the Council chamber, in Concord, this 8th day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty. [Proclamation. 1860 Oct. 8]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1863-1865: Gilmore). By His Excellency, Joseph A. Gilmore, governor of the state of New Hampshire. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, at Concord, this third day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. [Proclamation. 1863 Oct. 3]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1865-1867: Smyth). The State of New-Hampshire. By His Excellency, Frederick Smyth, governor: A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the state, at the Council chamber, in Concord, this twenth-third day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixth-six. [Proclamation. 1866 Oct. 23]

  • New Hampshire. Governor (1869-1871: Stearns). State of New Hampshire. A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. By His Excellency Onslow Stearns, governor. ... Thursday, the eighteenth day of November next ... Given at the Council chamber, in Concord, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine. [Proclamation. 1869 Oct. 27]


    New Jersey

  • New Jersey. Governor. (1746-1757: Belcher). "November Thanksgiving Thursday": Origins of Fourth Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day (includes Governor Jonathan Belcher's Proclamation for Day of Thanksgiving (1749)).

  • New Jersey. Governor (1776-1790: Livingston). By His Excellency William Livingston, Esq. ... a Proclamation. to appoint the said second Thursday of December next, to be set apart and observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving in this state ... Given under my hand and seal at arms at Trenton, the eleventh day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-three, and of the sovereignty and independence of the United States of America the eighth. Trenton: Printed by Isaac Collins, printer to the state, [1783]. 1 sheet.

  • New Jersey. Governor (1776-1790: Livingston). By His Excellency William Livingston, Esquire ... Proclamation. ... to recommend the said twenty-sixth day of November next, to be set apart and observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand and seal at arms, in Perth-Amboy, the twenty-eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine. Trenton: Printed by Isaac Collins, [1789]. 1 sheet.

  • New Jersey. Governor (1790-1793: Paterson). Proclamation - Thanksgiving Day - 1791, New Jersey. This is the text of the November 21, 1791 William Paterson Thanksgiving Day proclamation, as he served as governor of New Jersey; as printed in the Gazette of the United States, November 26, 1791.
  • New Jersey. Governor (1812-1813: Ogden). By Aaron Ogden, governor, captain general and commander in chief in and over the state of New Jersey ... A Proclamation. Whereas it is, at all times, the duty of states ... I do ... recommend and appoint Friday the first day of January next [1813], to be observed ... as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. [Trenton? : Printed by George Sherman?, 1812. 1 sheet.

  • New Jersey. Governor (1857-1860: Newell). By Aaron Ogden, governor, captain general and commander in chief in and over the state of New Jersey ... A Proclamation.
    The first and constant duty of a Christian people, is to recognize and acknowledge Almighty God as the Author and Giver of All Good, and to render to him humble and grateful homage for his merciful providence and care.
    Another year passed in the enjoyment of the inestimable blessings of liberty, peace, health and plenty, calls for our renewed and devout expressions of gratitude and praise.
    To this end, and in accordance with recognized usages, I hereby set apart and appoint Thursday, the eighteenth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Thanksgiving and Prayer, and do recommend to the people of this State, that forsaking all secular pursuits, they assemble in their several places of worship, and in sincerity of heart, offer thanks and praise to our Heavenly Father for all the blessings of the past, and implore his loving kindness and protection for the future.
    Given under my hand and privy seal, at Trenton, this twenty-sixth day of Octo[l. S.] ber, Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight.


    New York

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1692-1698: Fletcher). By His Excellency Benjamin Fletcher Captain General and Governor in chief of the Province of New York. A Proclamation. [Appointing Thanksgiving days for the safe return of William III to England, and for the military success in Flanders.] New York, 1695. 1 sheet; 25 x 17 cm.

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1692-1698: Fletcher). By His Excellency Benjamin Fletcher captain general and governour in chief of the province of New-York, &c. A Proclamation. New York, 1696. Broadside.

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1692-1698: Fletcher). By His Excellency Coll. Benjamin Fletcher, Captain General and Governour in Chief of His Majesties Province of New York, &c. A Proclamation . [Appointing a day of thanksgiving for the King's escape from the plot against his life.] New York, 1696.

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1692-1698: Fletcher). By His Excellency Coll. Benjamin Fletcher captain general and governour in chief of His Majesties Province of New-York, &c. A Proclamation. New York, May 21, 1696. Broadside.

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1692-1698: Fletcher). By His Excellency Coll. Benjamin Fletcher captain general and governour in chief of His Majesties province of New-York, &c. A Proclamation. Having received the joyful news of the safe arrival of His Most Excellent Majesty, William the Third ... I have therefore thought fit ... to appoint Thursday the 22th of April next ensuing, a solemn day of Thanksgiving ... Given at Fort William Henry the 25th day of March, in the ninth year of His Majesties reign annoq; Domin [sic] 1697. [New York]: Printed by William Bradford, printer to the Kings Most Excellent Majesty, in the city of New-York, 1697. 1 sheet.

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1692-1698: Fletcher). By His Excellency Collonel Benjamin Fletcher captain general and governour in chief of His Majesties province of New-York, &c. A Proclamation.: Whereas it hath graciously pleased Almighty God to crown the constant great courage and conduct of our Most gracious Soveraign Lord King William during the war, with an honourable peace ... I have therefore thought fit to appoint, that Thursday the tenth day of March next ... and Thursday the twenty fourth day of the same moneth ... be kept solemn days of Thanksgiving to Almighty God ... Given at New-York, the 26th day of February ... annoq; Domini 1697 [1698 N.S.]. [New York]: Printed by William Bradford, printer to the Kings Most Excellent Majesty in the city of New-York, 1697/8. 1 sheet.

  • New York (Colony). Governor (1743-1753: Clinton). [By His Excellency the Honourable George Clinton, captain general and governour in chief of the province of New York ... A proclama]tion: [Whereas thro' the divine blessing of] His Majesty's forces ... [Given under my hand] and seal at arms, in the city of New-York, this [fifteenth day of July] in the year of our Lord one thousand seven [hundred and forty-six]. [New York: Printed by James Parker, 1746] 1 sheet.

  • New York (State). Lieutenant Governor (1753-1760: De Lancey). By the Honourable James De Lancey, Esq; His Majesty's lieutenant governor, and commander in chief, in and over the province of New-York ... A Proclamation. Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God, the supreme disposer of all events, to bless the arms of our Most Gracious Sovereign, by sea and land both in Europe and America, with several great and important victories ... I have thought fit, with the advice of His Majesty's Council, to ordain ... Thursday the twenty-second day of November instant, be set apart ... as a day of Publick Thanksgiving to Almighty God ... Given under my hand and seal at arms, at Fort-George, in the city of New-York, the first day of November, 1759 [New York: Printed by William Weyman, 1759]. 1 sheet.

  • New York (Colony). Council. By the Honourable Cadwallader Colden, Esq; President of His Majesty's Council, and commander in chief of the province of New-York, and the territories depending thereon in America. A Proclamation. [New York: s.n., 1760] 1 sheet; 42 x 33 cm.
    Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to continue his divine presence and blessing with the forces of our gracious sovereign, employed in North America, and enable them not only to recover the Territories of which the French had unjustly and perfidiously possessed themselves, but also to reduce the whole country of Canada to the dominion of his Majesty whereby the northern Colonies are hapily delivered from the calamities of a cruel and barberous war, and have opened to them the most agreable prospect of lasting tranquility and the uninterupted enjoyment of their civil and religious liberties: All which great and unmerited blessings demand our public and grateful acknowledgements, I have therefore thought fit, by and with the advice of his Majesty's Council to ordain and I do ordain and appoint, that Thursday the third day of October instant, be set apart and observed throughout this Province as a day of Public Thanksgiving to Almighty God for these signal successes, and all his Majesty's subjects within this Government are strictly commanded to observe the said day with the utmost decency and reverance, abstaining from all servile labor and devoutly attending divine service which is hereby directed to be solomnly performed in all churches and chappells and other places of publick worship, of which previous notice is to be given by publishing this Proclamation in the several congregations: and I do recommend to ail ministers of the gospel that they offer up their earnest and devout prayers to Almighty God for the continuation of his blessing and protection on his Majesty's person and illustrious family, and for such further success to his arms as may secure a safe and lasting peace.
    Given under my hand and seal at arms at Fort George, in the city of New York, the first day of October 1760, in the 34th year of the reign of our sovereign Lord, George the Second, by the grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth.

  • New York (State). Lieutenant Governor (1761-1775: Colden). By the Honourable Cadwallader Colden, Esq; His Majesty's lieutenant governor and commander in chief of the province of New-York, A Proclamation: Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to permit the sincere and incessant labours of our Most Gracious Sovereign to restore the publick tranquility, to be frustrated by the obstinacy of the French King ... I have therefore thought fit to appoint ... Friday the seventh day of May next be set apart and observed throughout this province, for the solemn humiliation of ourselves before Almighty God with prayer and fasting ... Given under my hand and seal at arms, at Fort-George, in the city of New-York, the fifteenth day of April, 1762 [New York: Printed by William Weyman, 1762]. 1 sheet.

  • New York (State). Governor (1780-1783: Robertson). By His Excellency James Robertson, Esquire, captain-general and governor in chief, in and over the province of New-York ... A Proclamation. Whereas it hath graciously pleased Almighty God, to bestow signal victories on His Majesty's arms, and to defeat the united efforts of combined nations, whose powers, even when separate, have been formidable to all Europe ... I have therefore thought fit ... to ordain and appoint .. that Thursday the twenty-third day of this month, be set apart and observed, as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand and seal at arms, in the city of New-York, the fourteenth day of January, 1783. [New York: Printed by James Rivington, 1783]. 1 sheet.

  • New York (State). Governor (1795-1801: Jay). By his Excellency John Jay, Esq., Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the State of New York. A Proclamation. 1795.
    Whereas the Great Creator and Preserver of the Universe, is the Supreme Sovereign of Nations, and does when and as he pleases, reward or punish them by temporal blessings or calamities according as their national conduct recommends them to his favor and bene-ficence, or excites his displeasure and indignation: And whereas, in the course of his government he hath graciously been pleased to shew singular kindness to the people and nation of which this State is a constituent member, by protecting our ancestors in their first establishment in this then savage wilderness--by defending them against their enemies--by blessing them with an uncommon degree of peace, liberty and safety, and with the civilizing light and influence of his holy gospel--by leading us (as it were by the hand), through the various dangers and difficulties of the late revolution, and crowning it with success; by giving us wisdom and opportunity to establish governments and institutions, auspicious to order, security and rational liberty; by preserving us from being involved in the wars, and other grievous calamities, which at this moment afflict and distress many nations, by restoring peace between us and the hostile Indians, who infested our borders; by constantly favoring us with fruitful seasons, and in general, by giving us a greater portion of public welfare and prosperity than to any other people.
    And whereas, it hath pleased him, by permitting sickness to prevail, and be fatal to the lives of many of our principal city and in sundry places in this and other States, and by the extensive alarms and embarrassments which attended it, to remind us that prosperity and adversity are in his hand, and that in all our pursuits we are to remember that he is the cause and giver of all the good that was, that is or that will be.
    And whereas, our Almighty Sovereign, in addition to his other mercies, hath lately staid the hand of the destroying angel, and by thus manifesting and multiplying his benefits to us as a people, call upon us as a people to maniest our gratitude to him.
    Wherefore, and particularly on this occasion, it appears to me to be the public duty of the people of this State, collectively considered, to render unto him their sincere and humble thanks, for all these his great and unmerited mercies and blessings; and also to offer up to him their fervent petitions to continue to us his protection and favor. To preserve to us the undisturbed enjoyment of our civil and religious rights and privileges, and the valuable life and usefulness of the President of the United States. To enable all our rulers, councils and people, to do the duties incumbent on them, respectively, with wisdom and fidelity--to promote the extension of true religion, virtue and learning--to give us all grace to cultivate national union, concord and goodwill; and generally to bless our nation, and all other nations, in the manner and measure most conducive to our and their best interests and real welfare.
    Whether the Governor of this State is vested with authority to appoint a day for these purposes, and to enjoin the observance of it, is a question, which, circumstanced as it is, I consider as being more proper for the Legislature than for me to decide. But, as the people of the State have constituted me their Chief Magistrate, and being perfectly convinced, that national prosperity depends, and ought to depend, on national gratitude and obedience to the Supreme Ruler of all Nations, I think it proper to recommend, and therefore I do earnestly recommend, to the clergy and others, my fellow citizens, throughout this State, to set apart Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of November 1st., for the purposes aforesaid, and to observe it accordingly.
    Given under my hand, at the Government House, in the city of New York, on the eleventh day of November, in the year [l. S.] of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, and in the twentieth year of the Independence of the United States.

  • New York (State). Governor (1839-1842: Seward). A Proclamation. 1839.
    Whereas the Executive Authority of this State has been accustomed, with the consent of the people, to designate a day for the annual offerings of Thanksgiving and Prayer.
    And whereas, Almighty God hath not withdrawn from us the protection and beneficence extended to our forefathers, but hath remembered us in mercy during the past year; hath sent us abundant harvests, to reward the labors of the husbandman and supply the wants of the poor; hath averted from us the calamities of war and pestilence; hath suffered us to maintain and more firmly establish republican institutions, securing a larger measure of civil and religious liberty, social tranquillity and domestic happiness, than has ever before been enjoyed by any people; hath crowned with good success the means which have been employed by the State, by associations and by individuals, for the development of the abounding resources of our country, the relief of the unfortunate, the reformation of the vicious, the improvement of education, the cultivation of science, the perfection of the arts, and the maintenance of the Christian religion.
    Now, therefore, in pursuance of said custom, I do hereby appoint Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next, to be observed throughout this State, as a day of Public Worship, Thanksgiving and Prayer. I recommend to my fellow citizens, that they abstain on that day from all secular employments, inconsistent with a right and acceptable discharge of these solemn services; that they assemble in their usual places of public worship, and there, in the forms and manner approved by their consciences, offer their humble and grateful acknowledgments to the God of the Universe, celebrate his praise, invoke his continued protection and favor, and implore his guidance in the ways of wisdom and virtue; well knowing that his Providence is as impartial as it is beneficent. Let us also beseech him to deliver the oppressed throughout the world, and vouchsafe to all mankind the privileges of civil and religious liberty, and the knowledge, influences and blessed hopes of the gospel of his Son our Savior. In testimony wherereof, I have caused the privy seal of the State to be hereunto affixed, at the city of Albany, on the [l. s.] twenty-second day of October, in the year of our Lord 1839, and of American Independence the sixty-fourth.

  • New York (State). Governor (1839-1842: Seward). A Proclamation. By William H. Seward, Governor of the State of New York. 1840.
    God has been pleased to preserve our lives during another year, and to bless our land and make it very plenteous. Health, peace and liberty have dwelt among us, and religion has ministered her divine councils and consolations. No danger has menaced us from abroad, nor has the alarm of intestine commotion or tumult disturbed the quiet of our dwellings. The clouds have not withheld from the earth their timely rain, nor the sun its genial heat. The plow has not been stayed in the furrow, nor has blight or mildew diminished the abundant harvest. We have exhibited to the world the sublime spectacle, of millions of freemen carefully discussing the measures and policy which concern their welfare, and peacefully committing the precious trust of their interests and hopes to the care of their chosen magistrates. While our confidence in the stability of republican institutions is thus strengthened, their benign operation has been manifested in the sway of mild and equal laws, the enjoyment of equal privileges by all classes of citizens, the security of personal rights, and theintellectual and moral improvement of society.
    In remembrance of these signal and manifold blessings and privileges, it becomes us to lift up our hearts, and ascribe all the power and glory to Him who looketh down from heaven and considereth all them that dwell upon the earth. I do, therefore, in pursuance to a custom sanctioned by the people, set apart and appoint Thursday, the seventeenth day of December next, to be observed throughout this State, as a day for the usual offerings of Praise, Thanksgiving and Prayer. I respectfully recommend to my fellow citizens, to abstain from all secular occupations on that day, and gather themselves in their solemn assemblies, to render to our Heavenly Father the homage of hearts softened and warmed by his unbounded goodness; to commit to his tender care, the poor, the neglected and the oppressed and to supplicate a continuance of his favor to this people throughout all generations. However we may be separated by opinions or associations, all the cifizens of the Republic have equal political rights, and have the same motives to desire its peace, happiness and perpetual prosperity. The church of the living God is one, and embraces all those who in humility of spirit receive his holy faith, and through divine aid, seek to keep his commandments. Let us, therefore, in perfect harmony and charity, one with another, as patriots and Christians, implore him to sustain and bless all our civil and religious institutions, and to dispense to us abundantly that heavenly grace, which, with faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, leads through the ways of virtue, here, to the blessed society of the redeemed in his everlasting kingdom.
    Given under my hand and the privy seal of the State, at the city of Albany, this [l. s.] ninth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty.

  • New York (State). Governor (1839-1842: Seward). A Proclamation. By William H. Seward, Governor of the State of New York. 1841.
    In the year which is about to close, Divine Providence hath been pleased, as in former years, to vouchsafe to the inhabitants of this State, the various fruits of the earth in their proper seasons--health, security and tranquillity--prosperous commerce and peaceful relations with foreign countries--freedom of conscience--religious instruction and consolation; moral, social and intellectual improvement--and laws established and administered by representatives chosen by the people.
    I do, therefore, appoint Thursday, the ninth day of December next, to be set apart for the customary annual offerings of Public Thanksgiving and Praise to Almighty God, for all his mercies and blessings; and I recommend that the occasion be observed throughout the Commonwealth, with the humility, devotion and gratitude which become a free and favored Christian people.
    In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the privy seal of the said State to be annexed, at the city [L. S.] of Albany, this 25th day of October, 1841, and of American Independence the sixty-sixth.

  • New York (State). Governor (1843-1844: Bouck). A Proclamation. 1843.
    In obedience to that high sense of gratitude due the Almighty Ruler of the Universe, I do hereby designate Thursday, the 14th day of December next, to be observed by the people of this State as a day of Prayer, Praise and Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for the numerous and unmerited blessings of the year.
    I feel assured that this act of public duty is in accordance with the wishes of the people, and will meet with universal acquiescence.
    As a people, we have great reason to be thankful, and to praise the Almighty Dispenser of all Good, for the continued smiles of his providence on our State and Nation.
    During the past year we have been permitted to enjoy our religious and political privileges unmolested. We have been exempt from those ravages of malignant diseases, which sometimes afflict a people. The season has been highly propitious, and seldom has the harvest been more abundant. As a crowning blessing, the Spirit of the Lord has revived the hearts of Christians, and brought to saving knowledge many who knew not God.
    For the distinguished blessings we have enjoyed, we should raise our hearts in humble adoration to our Father in Heaven: thereby presenting to the world the imposing spectacle of the entire population of a great State abstaining from all secular engagements on the day designated, and devoting themselves to the service of the Almighty. We should always remember that "righteousness exalteth a nation."
    Given under my hand, and the privy seal of the State, at the city of Albany, this tenth [L. S.] day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-three.

  • New York (State). Governor (1843-1844: Bouck). By William C. Bouck, Governor of the State of New York. A Proclamation. 1844.
    A Nother year has nearly drawn to a close, and surrounded as we are by the unnumbered blessings of God's Providence and Grace, nothing can be more becoming and proper than to lay aside all secular engagements, and devote at least one day of the many we are allowed to call our own, to devout Thanksgiving and Praise to the Author of the constant and unmerited mercies we, as a people, are permitted to enjoy.
    I do, therefore, most cordially recommend, that Thursday, the twelfth day of December next, be observed throughout the State, as a day of Prayer, Praise and Thanksgiving to our great Father in Heaven, our gracious Benefactor and Friend.
    By his merciful Providence, we have been permitted to enjoy the comforts of life, and our religious, social and political privileges have been continued to us. During the past year we have been exempt from the ravages of malignant disease, and the earth has yielded her increase; a growing prosperity has been felt in all the business relations of life, and the blessed gospel has been gradually but surely extending its benign influence. Actuated by its diffusive benevolence, Christian missionaries have not only labored among the waste and desolate places at home, but have gone forth to proclaim "Christ and him crucified" to the dark and benighted regions of the earth; education, in all its departments, is diffusing an increase of knowledge among all classes of the community; temperance, the handmaid of religion, is making deeper and wider impressions, and sending joy and comfort into many desolate households, while peace and prosperity are dwelling in our midst.
    Let us, then, as one people, on the day designated, lay aside the care and ordinary business of life, and give thanks unto God. And with our Thanksgiving, let us mingle our Prayers for a continuance of the numerous blessings we enjoy, and especially that there may be an outpouring of the Spirit of God, to revive pure and undefiled religion among us-- the best security of our civil and political institutions.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed my name and the privy seal of the [l. S.] State, this eighth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-four.

  • New York (State). Governor (1839-1842: Seward). A Proclamation. By William H. Seward, Governor of the State of New York. 1842.
    Thursday, the eighth day of December next, is hereby appointed to be observed by the people of this State, as a day of Public Thanksgiving and Praise to Almighty God, for the manifold blessings of the year. We have tilled the earth in safety and gathered plentiful harvests ; relieved labor by inventions of art and new applications of science; brought to successful termination works of physical improvement, designed to promote social intercourse, and to guard against accidents to human life and augment its enjoyments; rendered our system of intellectual and moral instruction more equal and efficient, and acquired comprehensive knowledge of the agricultural, forest and mineral resources, which Providence has supplied within the territory assigned for our habitation. The savage warfare, which so long prevailed on the southern border of our country, scarcely less painful to humanity, whether our arms were victorious or unsuccessful against a rude and injured people, has ceased. Commotions which threatened to involve a sister State, and even the whole American family, in the calamities of civil war, and thus repress the growing confidence of mankind in their capacity for self-government, have peacefully subsided and our controversies with a distinguished European nation, have been adjusted by a treaty, securing reciprocal advantages, and directing the efforts of both. States to the removal of a great reproach of Christendom, by the extirpation of the slave trade. Philanthropy has not abated her zeal within our borders while extending her visitations to distant regions, and the labors of philosophy throughout the civilized world, have been crowned with discoveries tending to ameliorate human life, and elevate the dignity of mankind.
    Let us reverently acknowledge, that these and all the blessings that we enjoy, descend from Him, by whom the nations of the earth are governed in righteousness, and all human affairs are regulated and controlled with infinite wisdom and mercy.
    Given under my hand and the privy seal of the State, at the city of Albany, this [L. S.] 17th day of November, in the year of our Lord 1842, and in the sixty-seventh year of American Independence.

  • New York (State). Governor (1843-1844: Bouck). A Proclamation. 1844.
    Another year has nearly drawn to a close, and surrounded as we are by the unnumbered blessings of God's Providence and Grace, nothing can be more becoming and proper than to lay aside all secular engagements, and devote at least one day of the many we are allowed to call our own, to devout Thanksgiving and Praise to the Author of the constant and unmerited mercies we, as a people, are permitted to enjoy.
    I do, therefore, most cordially recommend, that Thursday, the twelfth day of December next, be observed throughout the State, as a day of Prayer, Praise and Thanksgiving to our great Father in Heaven, our gracious Benefactor and Friend.
    By his merciful Providence, we have been permitted to enjoy the comforts of life, and our religious, social and political privileges have been continued to us. During the past year we have been exempt from the ravages of malignant disease, and the earth has yielded her increase; a growing prosperity has been felt in all the business relations of life, and the blessed gospel has been gradually but surely extending its benign influence. Actuated by its diffusive benevolence, Christian missionaries have not only labored among the waste and desolate places at home, but have gone forth to proclaim "Christ and him crucified" to the dark and benighted regions of the earth; education, in all its departments, is diffusing an increase of knowledge among all classes of the community; temperance, the handmaid of religion, is making deeper and wider impressions, and sending joy and comfort into many desolate households, while peace and prosperity are dwelling in our midst.
    Let us, then, as one people, on the day designated, lay aside the care and ordinary business of life, and give thanks unto God. And with our Thanksgiving, let us mingle our Prayers for a continuance of the numerous blessings we enjoy, and especially that there may be an outpouring of the Spirit of God, to revive pure and undefiled religion among us -- the best security of our civil and political institutions.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed my name and the privy seal of the [l. S.] State, this eighth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-four.

  • New York (State). Governor (1847-1848: Young). A Proclamation. 1847.
    A Day of Public Thanksgiving is due to Almighty God for blessings bestowed upon the People of this State during the past year.
    While a sanguinary war has been raging upon our national frontier--while the principal city of a sister state, has been scourged with a pestilence that walketh at noon-day, and while gaunt famine and disease afflict the fairest portion of the mother country, the State of New York presents a gladsome picture of universal happiness and prosperity. Seed time and harvest have been continued to the husbandman-- the laborer and the artisan have not sought in vain for employment--the ships of the merchant have traded in peace with the nations of the earth, and plenty has crowned the efforts of all classes of society.
    The blessing of free government--the means of universal education--the security of person and property, and the supremacy of law and order, have been vouchsafed to us in an eminent degree. For all these, and for other good gifts, we are indebted to that Providence whose bounty and protection are conferred upon all, without regard to country or condition.
    I therefore respectfully recommend to the People of this State, to observe the twenty-fifth day of November next, as a day of Public Thanksgiving; to abstain on that day from their usual avocations, and mingle, with their Thanksgivings, Prayers to Heaven for the continuance of its smiles, and for its protection against famine, diseases and crime.
    In testimony whereof, I have caused the privy seal of the State to be hereunto affixed. Witness my hand, at the city [l. S.] of Albany, this eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven.

  • New York (State). Governor (1847-1848: Young). A Proclamation. Albany, 1848.
    The year which will soon be added to the past, has been to the People of this State eminently auspicious. Plenty has crowned our harvests' labor has been justly rewarded, and everything around us evidences a healthy and enduring prosperty. War, with all its attendant evils has passed away, and Peace as honorable as welcome, has been restored. The means of education, and all the advantages of intellectual progression have been enjoyed by us in an eminent degree; and the future is full of hope and promise.
    As a Christian people, we are admonished that these blessings are the gift of a Beneficent God, and while we thus rejoice in his bounty, we should not forget the homage due from grateful hearts.
    I, therefore, respectfully recommend to the People of this State, to set apart Thursday, the twenty-third day of November next, to be observed as a day of Public Thanksgiving to Almighty God; and that with such Thanksgiving be mingled Prayers to Him who holds in his hands the destinies of nations, for the continuance of those blessings, which have been and still are so abundantly showered upon us.
    In testimony whereof, I have caused the privy seal of the State to be hereunto affixed. Witness my hand, at the city [l. S.] of Albany, this twenty-eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred forty-eight.

  • New York (State). Governor (1849-1850: Fish). A Proclamation. Albany, 1849.
    A Sense of gratitude to Almighty God for his numerous manifestations of goodness during the past year, calls for a public expression of thanks from a people who have experienced the full measures of blessings which have been extended to us.
    Peace and quiet have reigned throughout our land. The labors of the husbandman have been rewarded in the returns of the earth. Industry has pursued its accustomed walks in all its varied employments, and its votaries have enjoyed honest and well earned rewards. Civil and religious liberty continue to be vouchsafed to all within our borders--and the blessings of the gospel are extended to all who desire to enjoy its comforts and its consolations. A few weeks since the whole nation in humble dependence, united in earnest prayer to Almighty God to withdraw the grievous pestilence which was ravaging the land; that visitation having passed, and the blessings of public health restored, it becomes a grateful and Christian people to acknowledge these mercies and to render thanks to their Bountiful Giver.
    I do therefore designate Thursday, the twentyninth day of November, instant, and do recommend its observance by the People of this State as a day of Public Thanksgiving to Almighty God.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto signed my name, and affixed the privy seal of [L. S.] the State, at the city of Albany, this first day of November, one thousand eight hundred and forty-nine.

  • New York (State). Governor (1855-1856: Clark). A Proclamation. By Myron H. Clark, Governor of the State of New York. 1855.
    The Lord has been pleased to preserve our lives, and to deal graciously with us during another year. While sanguinary war has desolated the soil and saddened the homes- of Europe, peace has sat by our firesides, and plenty has walked in our fields. The earth, parched with no drought, and chilled by no unwonted frosts, has yielded her increase bounteously. Pestilence, that has ravaged a neighboring coast, has been stayed at our threshold, and we have been enabled to minister to the wants and necessities of the suffering and afflicted. The commercial, mechanical and various pursuits of our citizens, have been crowned with usual success. Science and art have made liberal progress among us, and religion, unawed by power and unchecked by bigotry, has imparted her divine teachings and ministered her consolations. Our republican institutions, with good and wholesome laws, have helped to lighten the burdens of our people, and to advance the moral and intellectual improvement of society.
    In grateful remembrance of our manifold blessings, it becomes us to lift up our hearts to God, the Giver of all Good, who carefully considereth all the dwellers upon the earth. I do, therefore, and in pursuance of established custom, set apart and appoint Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next, to be observed throughout the State, as a day of Praise, Thanksgiving and Prayer; and I respectfully recommend to my fellow citizens, to abstain from all secular occupations on that day, to gather themselves in their assemblies and render to our Heavenly Father the homage of grateful hearts, remembering before him the poor, the neglected and the oppressed. Let us, as patriots and Christians, implore him to bless our civil and religious institutions ; and let us supplicate him to continue his favors to this people throughout all generations, and withal to dispense to us individually, that heavenly grace, which, with faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, and virtuous action here, will prepare us for his heavenly kingdom.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the privy [L. S.] seal of the State, at the city of Albany, this twenty-seventh day of October, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five.

  • Brooklyn, N. Y. Strong Place Baptist church. National thanksgiving November 30th, at 11 o'clock A. M. Strong Place Baptist Church Brooklyn, N. Y. . [Bulletin] [Brooklyn, N. Y.] Argus Print. 1876. Brooklyn, 1876. 4 p.; 27.5 x 18 cm.

  • New York (State). Governor (1899-1900: Roosevelt, Theodore). Thanksgiving proclamation. State of New York. Executive Chamber ... In accordance with the wise custom of our forefathers now continued for many generations, I hereby set apart Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November, nineteen hundred, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer to the Almighty for the innumerable benefits conferred upon the citizens of this State, in common with their fellow citizens of the whole nation during the year which has just passed; for the material well being which we enjoy, and for the chances of moral betterment which are always open to us.
    Done at the Capitol in the city of Albany this thirteenth day of November in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred. Albany, 1900. 1 sheet; 40.5 x 26.5 cm.

  • New York (State). Governor (1901-1904: Odell, Jr.). Thanksgiving proclamation. State of New York. Executive chamber ... I therefore designate Thursday November twenty-seventh, 1902 as a day of thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand and the privy seal of the state at the capital in the ... Albany, 1902. 1 sheet; 40.5 x 26.5 cm.

  • New York (State). Governor (1901-1904: Odell, Jr.). Thanksgiving Proclamation. State of New York ... A YEAR of prosperity has brought its rewards to our people. Our State has made progress, and with it have come greater advantages to our citizens. The Nation, of which our commonwealth is an integral part, has been the pacific agent for the extension of Christianity and civilization. In all we have been singularly blessed by the evidences of Divine favor. It is therefore not only our duty, but we should also welcome the opportunity for expressing our gratitude to the Ruler of the Universe. Let us then, in accordance with time-honored custom, put aside secular employment and repair to our various places of worship and there offer up praise and thanksgiving to God. In order that we may discharge this duty, and in pursuance of the power vested in me, I hereby set aside and designate Thursday, November twenty-sixth, one thousand nine hundred and three, as a day of Thanksgiving and Prayer.

    Given under my hand and the Privy Seal of the State at the Capitol, in the City of Albany, this tenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and three. .. Albany, 1903. 1 sheet; 30 x 23 cm. Published in New York Times, November 11, 1903.


    North Carolina

  • North Carolina. Governor (1776-1780, 1784-1787). Proclamation by Richard Caswell concerning a day of thanksgiving [as printed in the North-Carolina Gazette]. Caswell, Richard, 1729-1789. November 14, 1777. Volume 11, Page 805.
    "Whereas I have received authenticated Intelligence that General Burgoyne, and the whole Army under his Command, after repeated Losses, surrendered themselves as prisoners of War to General Gates on the Fourteenth Day of October last; To the End therefore that we may not presumptuously attribute the late signal successes gained over our Enemies to our own Strength, and thereby forget the interposition of Divine Providence in our Behalf, whose assistance we have experienced, and more especially in this Particular, wherein the Goodness of God has been so visibly demonstrated; I have thought proper, with the Advice of the Council of State, to issue this Proclamation, appointing Friday the Twenty Eighth Day of this Instant to be observed in all Churches and Congregations in this State as a Day of General and Solemn Thanksgiving, and I do strictly enjoin the several Ministers and Preachers of the Gospel to embrace this opportunity of testifying, in the most solemn Manner, those Sentiments of Gratitude which the happy Event so justly demands. ...


    North Dakota

  • North Dakota. Governor (1899-1901: Fancher, F. B.). State of North Dakota. Thanksgiving Proclamation. Bismarck, 1899.

  • North Dakota. Governor (1901-1905: White). State of North Dakota Executive Department, Bismark. Thanksgiving proclamation: Thursday the 28th day of November, has been designated by the President of the United States as Thanksgiving day ... Frank White, Governor. Bismarck. 1901.

  • North Dakota. Governor (1901-1905: White). State of North Dakota Executive department. Thanksgiving proclamation. In accordance with the sacred custom of our fathers and in conformity with the proclamation of the President of the United States I do hereby name Thursday, the twenty-sixth ... Bismarck, 1903.


    Ohio

  • Ohio. Governor (1849-1850: Ford, Seabury). By His Excellency, John Brough, governor of the state of Ohio. A Proclamation. Published in The Oberlin evangelist, Volumes 11-12, By Henry Cowles, Asa Mahan. R.E. Gillett, 1849. Also published in Defiance Democrat, Defiance, Ohio, November 3, 1849, p. 2, and Huron Reflector, Norwalk, Ohio, November 6, 1849, p. 3.
    It was resolved by the General Assembly, on the 21st of March, A. D. 1849, "That the Governor be requested to appoint a day of General Thanksgiving throughout the State, and to confer with the Executives of other States, in order to secure, as nearly as possible, the observance of the same day throughout the Union."
    Now, Therefore, in pursuance of this resolution, I SEABURY FORD, Governor of the State of Ohio, do set apart Thursday, the 29th day of November next as a day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God throughout the State of Ohio.
    The Divine goodness, our dependence, previous and increasing usage, and its own useful adaptations, recommend the observance of such a day. Then let grateful acknowledgements go up to Heaven from every heart, from domestic altars, and from all our places of public worship.
    Let God be praised for the blessings of his providence and of his grace; for civil, social, and religious privileges continued through another year.
    With thanksgiving let us associate confession of unworthiness, and deplore the prevalence of vice and irreligion. Let us supplicate forgiveness and needed grace, that the goodness of God may lead us to repentance; that from his judgments they may learn righteousness, and that we may be exalted and prospered by Him.
    Let us implore his choicest gifts upon the other States of our Union, and pray that He will extend to our citizens and to the inhabitants of the world, the blessings of freedom, intelligence, virtue, and religion, and impart to all "the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."
    In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my name, and caused the Great Seal of the State of Ohio to be affixed at Columbus, this 28th day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty nine, in the seventy fourth year of the Independence of the United States of America. By the Governor,
    SEABURY FORD

  • Ohio. Governor (1864-1865: Brough). By His Excellency, John Brough, governor of the state of Ohio. A Proclamation. ... I, John Brough, governor of the state of Ohio, do hereby designate and set apart the last Thursday of the present month of November, being the twenty-fourth day of said month, as a day of Thanksgiving and prayer ... In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my name at Columbus, the ninth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. [Proclamation. 1864 Nov. 9]

  • Ohio. Governor (1865-1866: Anderson). Thanksgiving for victory, peace, and our country saved. A Proclamation by Charles Anderson, governor of the state of Ohio. ... I, Charles Anderson, governor of the state of Ohio, do hereby appoint the last Thursday, being the 30th day of the present month of November, as a day of general thanksgiving and praise ... In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my name ... at Columbus, on this, the third day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Columbus, 1865.[2] leaves 41 cm. [Proclamation. 1865 Nov. 3]. Also here.

  • Ohio. Governor (1865-1866: Anderson). Thanksgiving. A Proclamation by Charles Anderson, governor of the state of Ohio. Whereas, I am now advised that the states of the Union have now, almost unanimously, designated, for their state occasions, the date heretofore set apart, by the President of the United States, for the nation's thanksgiving ... I, Charles Anderson, governor of the state of Ohio, do hereby revoke the appointment of the day heretofore recommended and I do now set apart, in lieu thereof, the first Thursday, being the seventh day of the month of December proximo ... In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at the city of Columbus, on this the sixteenth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. [2] leaves 25 cm. [Proclamation. 1865 Nov. 16]. Also here.

  • Ohio. Governor (1868-1872: Hayes). Diary and Letters of Rutherford B. Hayes. Volume 3, Chapter 27. Governor of Ohio -- First Term, 1868-1869. Columbus, Ohio, November 13, 1869, p. 72.
    "I have the Thanksgiving Proclamations of twenty-seven States--all recognizing religion, nearly all the religion of the Bible, and several the Divinity of Christ. More are coming, doubtless. Our Legislature for many years has passed a joint resolution annually authorizing a thanksgiving and frequently in terms which recognized the religion of the Bible. The last Legislature omitted to do so by a mere accident this year, but in [the] Sixty-fifth volume Ohio Laws, page 306, passed one last year. If you wish to borrow my bundle of Thanksgiving Proclamations I will send them to you. All state institutions have religious exercises, some of them chaplains paid under state laws. The meetings of the two houses of the General Assembly are always opened with prayer in accordance, sometimes, with resolutions (passed unanimously usually), and sometimes by common consent. The inaugurations of governors are prefaced by religious exercises."

  • Ohio. Governor (1896-1900: Bushnell, Asa). Thanksgiving Day in Ohio, Published in The New York Times, November 9, 1899, [Proclamation. 1899 Nov. 8].

  • Ohio. Governor (1906-1909: Harris, Andrew L.). Thanksgiving Proclamation. Published in The Bryan Times, November 8, 1907, p. 4.


    Oklahoma

  • Oklahoma. Ter. Governor (1901-1906: Ferguson, T. B.). In the name and by the authority of the Territory of Oklahoma. Executive department. Thanksgiving proclamation. ... I recommend that Thursday, November 27th, 1902. be observed as a day set apart for devotion and thanksgiving ... Done at Guthrie, ... Guthrie, 1902.
    Pennsylvania

  • Pennsylvania. Lieutenant Governor (1738-1747: Thomas). By the Honourable George Thomas, Esq; lieutenant governor, and commander in chief, of the province of Pennsylvania ... a Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of this instant July, be observed ... as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, and the great seal of the province of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, this fourteenth day of July ... one thousand seven hundred and forty-six. Philadelphia: Printed by B. Franklin, printer to the province, [1746]. 1 sheet.

  • Pennsylvania. Supreme Executive Council. Pennsylvania, ss: By the President and the Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, a Proclamation. Whereas the United States in Congress assembled by their Proclamation, dated the eighteenth day of October instant ... Given in Council ... at Philadelphia, this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty three. [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Bailey, 1783]. 1 sheet.

  • Pennsylvania. Governor (1790-1799: Mifflin). Pennsylvania, ss. By Thomas Mifflin, governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A Proclamation, appointing a day of general humiliation, Thanksgiving & prayer. ... Given ... at Philadelphia, this fourteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety three. Philadelphia: Printed by E. Oswald, no. 156, Market-Street, south, between Fourth & Fifth-Streets, [1793]. 1 sheet.


    Rhode Island

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1755-1765: Hopkins). By the Honorable Stephen Hopkins, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... I issue this Proclamation, hereby ordering that Thursday, the twenty-second day of November current, be observed and kept by all the inhabitants of this colony, as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, at the Council chamber, at South-Kingstown, the second day of November ... Annoq; dom. 1759. [Newport, R.I: Printed by James Franklin, 1759]. 1 sheet; 35 x 29 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1755-1765: Hopkins). By the Honorable Stephen Hopkins, Esquire, governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving in said colony. ... Given under my hand and the seal of the colony aforesaid, at Providence, the fifth day of November ... Anno domini, 1760. [Newport, R.I: Printed by James Franklin, 1760]. 1 sheet; 37 x 32 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1762-1763: Ward). By the Honorable Samuel Ward, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... the General Assembly passed an act, appointing Thursday the eighteenth instant ... a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... and therein requested me to issue a Proclamation to make the same known ... Given under my hand at Newport, this fifth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and sixty two [Providence]: Printed by William Goddard, in Providence, [1762]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1763-1765: Hopkins). By the Honorable Stephen Hopkins, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. The burthens and calamities of a cruel and expensive war, having been happily terminated by a just and glorious peace, the King hath judged it proper, that a Publick Thanksgiving to Almighty God, should be observed throughout all his colonies in America ... Thursday the twenty-fifth day of the present month ... Given under my hand and seal at arms, at Providence, the eighth day of August ... 1763. Providence: Printed by William Goddard, [1763]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1765-1767: Ward). By the Honorable Samuel Ward, Esq; ... A Proclamation. The General Assembly of this colony having appointed Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of this instant, November ... as a day of Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand at Newport, this eleventh day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and sixty-five Newport [R.I.]: Printed by Samuel Hall, [1765]. 1 sheet. Coat of arms; 42 x 31 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1765-1767: Ward). By the Honorable Samuel Ward, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. The General Assembly of this colony having appointed Thursday, the twenty-six ... Given under my hand at Newport, this sixteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thouand seven hundred and sixty-six. [Newport, R.I: Printed by Samuel Hall, 1766]. 1 sheet; 31 x 26 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1778-1786: Greene). By His Excellency William Greene, Esquire, Governor ... of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations ... A Proclamation: Whereas the most honorable the Continental Congress did on the seventeenth day of November last, pass the following resolve ... I have therefore thought fit to issue this Proclamation ... to observe the said thirtieth day of December, as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the said state, this eighth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight. [Providence: Printed by John Carter?, 1778]. 1 sheet.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1778-1786: Greene). By His Excellency William Greene, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. Whereas the Most Honorable the Congress of the United States of America did, on the twentieth day of October last, pass the following resolve ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the said state, this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-nine Providence: Printed by John Carter, [1779] 1 sheet; 41 x 27 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1778-1786: Greene). By His Excellency William Greene, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. Given under my hand, and the seal of the said state, this twenty-sixth day of November, A.D. 1781 Providence: Printed by John Carter, [1781]. 1 sheet; 43 x 31 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1778-1786: Greene). By His Excellency William Greene, Esq; Governor ... of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations. A Proclamation. ... that Thursday, the first day of December next, should be observed by the inhabitants of this state as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, this tenth day of November ... 1785. Providence: Printed by John Carter, [1785]. 1 sheet; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand, at Providence, this fifth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two [Providence]: Printed by J. Carter, [1792]. 1 sheet; 40 x 31 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the said state, this fourth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three [Providence]: Printed by Carter and Wilkinson, [1793] 1 sheet; 42 x 34 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esquire, governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand ... at Providence, this third day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four Warren [R.I.]: Printed by Nathaniel Phillips, printer to the Honorable the General Assembly, [1794] 1 sheet; 36 x 26 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esq; governor ... of the state of Rhode-Island and Providence-Plantations. A Proclamation. ... Given ... at Providence, this sixth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five Providence: Printed by Carter and Wilkinson, [1795]. 1 sheet.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the said state, at Providence, this sixth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five Providence: Printed by Carter and Wilkinson, [1795]. 1 sheet; 38 x 31 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island ... a Proclamation. ... Given under my hand ... this seventh day of November, A.D. 1796 Warren [R.I.]: Printed by Nathaniel Phillips, printer to the state, [1796] 1 sheet; 40 x 32 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esquire, governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand, at Providence, this thirtieth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven Warren [R.I.]: Printed by Nathaniel Phillips printer to the state, [1797] 1 sheet; 43 x 34 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esq; governor ... of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations. A Proclamation. Whereas the General Assembly ... resolved, that it be and hereby is recommended to the people of this state, to observe Thursday the twenty-eighth day of November inst. as a day of Publick and devout prayer and Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, and the seal of the said state, at Providence, this fifth day of November ... one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine. Providence: Printed by John Carter, [1799]. 1 sheet; 39 x 31 cm.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1790-1805: Fenner). By His Excellency Arthur Fenner, Esquire, L.S. governor ... of Rhode-Island ... A Proclamation. ... Given under my hand and the seal of the said state, at Providence, this third day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred. [Newport, R.I: Printed by Oliver Farnsworth, 1800]. 1 sheet.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1857-1859: Dyer). A Proclamation By Elisha Dyer, Governor of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. 1858.
    In accordance with a "time-honored custom," and as required by law, I, Elisha Dyer, Governor of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, do issue this my Proclamation, appointing Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next, as a day of Public Thanksgiving and Praise to Almighty God, for the innumerable blessings he has bestowed upon us, the people of this State, during the past year.
    The preservation of our lives; the absence of contagious disease; the abundant harvest that has so richly rewarded the labors of the husbandman; the unrestricted enjoyment of our civil rights and religious privileges; the wide spread manifestations and presence of the Holy Spirit; the "means of grace and hope of glory" still offered us in the religion of Jesus Christ, all proclaim his dealings with us to have been in mercy and with love.
    And we should also remember with gratitude that this day commemorates" the departure informer years of those who would have oppressed our country, and the assurance, so recently given, that a bond of peace and fraternity may be established between all nations.
    I, therefore, appeal with confidence to the grateful appreciation of these mercies, by my fellow-citizens throughout the State, for their cooperation in the proper observance of this day, by abstaining from all secular labor, in their attendance upon public worship, and by the dispensation of that sympathetic benevolence which the prostration of industry has demanded; thus cheering the hearts of the desolate, and making glad the homes of the destitute.
    Given under my hand and seal of this State this twenty-seventh day of October, in [L. S.] the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, and of Independence the eighty-third.

  • Rhode Island. Governor (1869-1873: Padelford). State of Rhode Island & Providence Plantations. Thanksgiving Proclamation, by His Excellency: Seth Padelford, governor and commander-in-chief. In accordance with an ancient and much venerated custom ... I hereby appoint Thursday, the 18th of November, next, as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... In testimony whereof, I have hereto set my hand and affixed the seal of the state, at Providence, this thirtieth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine. [Proclamation. 1869 Oct. 30] Disclaimer: Padelford was a Unitarian.


    South Dakota

  • South Dakota. Governor (1901-1905: Herreid, Charles N.). Thanksgiving proclamation. State of South Dakota. I Charles N. Herreid, Governor of the State of South Dakota, do hereby designate Thursday, November 26th, 1903 as a day of thanksgiving and prayer. Pierre, 1903.

  • South Dakota. Governor (1901-1905: Herreid, Charles N.). South Dakota. Thanksgiving proclamation. 1904 State of South Dakota. Pierre 1904.


    Vermont

  • Vermont. (Republic) Governor (1778-1789: Chittenden, Thomas). By His Excellency Thomas Chittenden, Esq; ... A Proclamation. ... I do hereby appoint Thursday the twenty-sixth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... this 18th day of October, in the year of our Lord 1778 [Dresden, Vt., i.e., Hanover, N.H: Printed by Judah Padock and Alden Spooner, 1778] 1 sheet; 42 x 33 cm.

  • Vermont. (Republic) Governor (1778-1789: Chittenden, Thomas). By His Excellency Thomas Chittenden, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... I do hereby appoint Thursday, the second day of December next, as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, in the Council chamber, at Rutland, this 18th day of October, Annoque Domini, 1784 [Windsor, Vt.?: Printed by Hough & Spooner?, 1784]. 1 sheet.

  • Vermont. (Republic) Governor (1778-1789: Chittenden, Thomas). By His Excellency Thomas Chittenden, Esquire ... a Proclamation. ... I do hereby appoint Thursday the sixth day of December next, to be observed and kept as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, in Council, at Chartestown [i.e., Charlestown], this 27th day of October ... 1781. [Westminster, Vt: Printed by J.P. Spooner, 1781] 1 sheet; 31 x 20 cm.

  • Vermont. (Republic) Governor (1789-1790: Robinson). By His Excellency Moses Robinson, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... I do hereby appoint, Thursday the twenty-sixth day of November next, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving and praise throughout this state ... Given under my hand ... this 17th day of October, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine [Windsor, Vt.?: Printed by Alden Spooner?, 1789] 1 sheet; 34 x 23 cm.

  • Vermont. (Republic) Governor (1778-1789: Chittenden, Thomas). By His Excellency Thomas Chittenden, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... I do hereby appoint Thursday the first day of December next, to be observed as a day of Publick adoration, Thanksgiving, and praise, throughout this state ... Given under my hand ... this 20th day of October, A.D. 1791 Windsor [Vt.]: Printed by Alden Spooner, [1791] 1 sheet; 40 x 31 cm.

  • Vermont. (State) Governor (1797-1807: Tichenor). By Isaac Tichenor, governor of the state of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... the first Thursday of December next, being the sixth day of said month, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving ... Given at the Council chamber in the city of Vergennes, this 29th day of October, A.D. 1798. [Vergennes, Vt.]: Printed at Vergennes, by George and Robert Waite, [1798]. 1 sheet; 36 x 31 cm.

  • Vermont. Governor (1797-1807: Tichenor). By the Governor of the state of Vermont, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the third day of December next, to be observed ... as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Newbury, this nineteenth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and one. [United States: s.n., 1801]. 1 broadside.

  • Vermont. Governor (1797-1809: Tichenor). A Proclamation for a day of Publick Thanksgiving and praise / by Isaac Tichenor, Esq., Governor ... State of Vermont [Burlington, Vt: s.n., 1802?] 1 broadside.

  • Vermont. Governor (1797-1809: Tichenor). By His Excellency, Isaac Tichenor, Esq. governor ... of Vermont, a Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the ninth day of December next ... Given under my hand at Burlington, this first day of November, 1802. [Proclamation. 1802 Nov. 1]

  • Vermont. Governor (1797-1809: Tichenor). By His Excellency Isaac Tichenor, Esquire, governor ... of Vermont, a Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Thursday, the fourth day of December next ... Given under my hand at Middlebury, this third day of November ... 1806. [Proclamation. 1806 Nov. 3]

  • Vermont. Governor (1808-1809: Tichenor). By His Excellency, Isaac Tichenor, Esquire, governor ... of Vermont, a Proclamation. ... Thursday the eighth day of December next, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in Council, this 2d day of November ... 1808. [Vermont: s.n., 1808] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1808 Nov. 2]

  • Vermont. Governor (1809-1813: Galusha). By His Excellency Jonas Galusha, Esquire, captain-general, governour, and commander in chief, in and over the state of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... the first Thursday of December next to be observed as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in Council chamber, this 20th day of October, A. D. 1809. [Bennington, Vt.?: s.n., 1809] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1809 Oct. 20]

  • Vermont. Governor (1809-1813: Galusha). By His Excellency, Jonas Galusha, Esquire, governor ... of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... Wednesday the eighteenth day of April next, to be observed as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer ... Given under my hand, at Shaftsbury, this eighth day of March ... one thousand eight hundred and ten. [Proclamation. 1810 Mar. 8]

  • Vermont. Governor (1809-1813: Galusha). By His Excellency Jonas Galusha, Esquire, captain-general, governour, and commander in chief, in and over the state of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... the first Thursday of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this twenty fourth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and ten. [Proclamation. 1810 Oct. 24]

  • Vermont. Governor (1809-1813: Galusha). By His Excellency, Jonas Galusha, Esquire, governor ... of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the fifth day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer ... Given under my hand at Montpelier, this 21st day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and eleven. [Montpellier, Vt.?: s.n., 1811] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1811 Oct. 21]

  • Vermont. Governor (1813-1815: Chittenden, Martin). By His Excellency Martin Chittenden, Esquire, governor ... of Vermont, A Proclamation ... Thursday, the second day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this tenth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and thirteen ...[Montpelier, Vt.?: Walton & Cross?, 1813] 1 broadside. [Proclamation. 1813 Nov. 10]

  • Vermont. Governor (1815-1820: Galusha). By His Excellency Jonas Galusha, Esquire ... governor ... of Vermont, a Proclamation. ... Thursday, the seventh day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this 25th day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifteen. [Proclamation. 1815 Oct. 25]

  • Vermont. Governor (1815-1820: Galusha). By His Excellency Jonas Galusha Esquire ... governor ... of Vermont, a Proclamation. ... Wednesday, the seventeenth day of April next, a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer ... Given under my hand, at Shaftsbury, this fifth day of March ... one thousand eight hundred and sixteen. [Proclamation. 1816 Mar. 5]

  • Vermont. Governor (1815-1820: Galusha). By His Excellency Jonas Galusha, Esquire, governor ... of Vermont. A Proclamation ... Wednesday, the twenty-first day of April next, to be observed as a day of public fasting humiliation and prayer ... Given under my hand, at Shaftsbury, this twenty-fourth day of February ... one thousand eight hundred and nineteen. [Proclamation. 1819 Feb. 24]

  • Vermont. Governor (1820-1823: Skinner). By His Excellency Richard Skinner, captain-general, governor, and commander in chief ... of Vermont, A Proclamation. ... Friday, the twenty second day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this thirty first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty. [Proclamation. 1820 Oct. 31]

  • Vermont. Governor (1820-1823: Skinner). By His Excellency Richard Skinner ... A Proclamation. As it is our privilege to rejoice in the mercy of God, and to celebrate with thanksgiving and praise his beneficence; so it is our duty to recognize his justice, in the afflictive dispensations of his providence; and to mourn under his judgments. ... Given under my hand, at MSkinner.Vermont.TP.10-31-1820anchester, this twenty-third day of February, in the year of our Lord Christ, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one, and of the Independence of the United States, the forty-fifth. [Proclamation. 1821 Oct. 29]

  • Vermont. Governor (1820-1823: Skinner). By His Excellency Richard Skinner, governor ... of Vermont, A Proclamation. ... I do ... hereby appoint Thursday the fifth day of December next, a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this twenty eighth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty two. [Proclamation. 1822 Oct. 28]

  • Vermont. Governor (1823-1826: Van Ness). By His Excellency Cornelius P. Van Ness ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the fourth day of December next, to be observed as a day of publick thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this twenty-fifth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-three. Proclamation. 1823 Oct. 25]

  • Vermont. Governor (1823-1826: Van Ness). By His Excellency Cornelius P. Van Ness ... A Proclamation. ... I do ... appoint Thursday, the second day of December next, a day of publick thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this fourth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four. [Proclamation. 1824 Nov. 4]

  • Vermont. Governor (1823-1826: Van Ness). By His Excellency Cornelius P. Van Ness ... A Proclamation. ... I do ... appoint Thursday the first day of December next, a day of publick thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this twelfth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five[Proclamation. 1825 Nov. 12].

  • Vermont. Governor (1826-1828: Butler). By His Excellency Ezra Butler, Esquire ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the seventh day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving, praise and prayer ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this seventh day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six. [Proclamation. 1826 Nov. 7].

  • Vermont. Governor (1826-1828: Butler). By His Excellency Ezra Butler ... A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the sixth day of December next, to be observed ... as a day of publick thanksgiving and praise. ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this twenty-fifth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven. [Proclamation. 1827 Oct. 25].

  • Vermont. Governor (1828-1831: Crafts). By His Excellency Samuel C. Crafts, Esq. governor of Vermont, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the fourth day of December next, to be kept and observed as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, this twenty-ninth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight. [Proclamation. 1828 Oct. 29]

  • Vermont. Governor (1828-1831: Crafts). By His Excellency Samuel C. Crafts, Esq. governor ... of Vermont, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the third day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, this twenty-sixth day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine. [Proclamation. 1829 Oct. 6]

  • Vermont. Governor (1828-1831: Crafts). By His Excellency Samuel C. Crafts, governor of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the second day of December, next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand, in Council chamber, at Montpelier, this first day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty. [Proclamation. 1830 Nov. 1]

  • Vermont. Governor (1831-1835: Palmer) By His Excellency William A. Palmer, governor of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the first day of December next, to be observed by the people of this state as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand, in Council Chamber, at Montpelier, this first day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one. [Proclamation. 1831 Nov. 1]

  • Vermont. Governor (1831-1835: Palmer) By His Excellency William A. Palmer, governor of Vermont. A Proclamation, for a day of public thanksgiving, praise and prayer. ... Thursday the sixth day of December next ... Given under my hand, in Council Chamber, at Montpelier, this fifth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two. [Proclamation. 1832 Nov. 5]

  • Vermont. Governor (1831-1835: Palmer) By His Excellency William A. Palmer, governor, captain-general, and commander in chief in and over the state of Vermont. A Proclamation. ... Thursday the fifth day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving, prayer, and praise ... Given under my hand in Council Chamber, at Montpelier, this 29th day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty three ... [Montpelier, Vt.: s.n., 1833. 1 sheet: ill.; 42 x 33 cm. Signed: William A. Palmer. By His Excellency the governor. George B. Manser, secretary./ Vermont seal printed in lower left hand corner./ N-YHS copy: fabric lining. OCLC: 58786919. New York Historical Society.

  • Vermont. Governor (1831-1835: Palmer) State of Vermont. By His Excellency William A. Palmer, governor, a Proclamation. ... Thursday, the fourth day of December next, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand in Council Chamber, at Montpelier, this 25th day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four. [Montpelier, Vt. : s.n., 1834. 1 sheet: ill.; 38 x 32 cm. Signed: Wm. A.Palmer. By His Excellency, the governor. Geo. B. Manser, secretary./ Printed area measures 32.1 x 22.4 cm.

  • Vermont. Governor (1835-1841: Jenison). State of Vermont. By Silas H. Jenison, governor, A Proclamation for a day of public thanksgiving. ... Thursday, the first day of December next ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this fourteenth day of November ... one thousand, eight hundred and thirty-six. [Proclamation. 1836 Nov. 14]

  • Vermont. Governor (1835-1841: Jenison). State of Vermont. A Proclamation by the governor. ... Thursday, the sixteenth day of November next, to be observed ... as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this thirty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven. [Proclamation. 1837 Oct. 31]

  • Vermont. Governor (1835-1841: Jenison). State of Vermont. By Silas H. Jenison, governor, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the sixth day of December next, to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this thirty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight. [Proclamation. 1838 Oct. 31]

  • Vermont. Governor (1835-1841: Jenison). State of Vermont. A Proclamation by the governor. ... Thursday, the fifth day of December next, to be observed ... as a day of public thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this eleventh day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine. [Proclamation. 1839 Nov. 11]

  • Vermont. Governor (1835-1841: Jenison). State of Vermont. A Proclamation by the governor. ... Thursday, the third day of December next, to be observed ... as a day of thanksgiving, prayer, and praise. ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this twenty-seventh day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and forty. [Proclamation. 1840 Oct. 27]

  • Vermont. Governor (1841-1843: Paine) State of Vermont. By Charles Paine, governor, A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the second day of December next, to be observed ... as a day of public thanksgiving, prayer and praise ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this ninth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and forty-one. [Proclamation. 1841 Nov. 9]

  • Vermont. Governor (1841-1843: Paine) State of Vermont. By His Excellency, Charles Paine, governor, A Proclamation. Thursday, the eighth day of December next, to be set apart ... as a day for the customary annual offerings of public thanksgiving, prayer and praise ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this twelfth day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and forty-two. [Montpelier, Vt.: Published by E.P. Walton and Sons, 1842. 1 sheet ([1] p.): ill.; 40 x 31 cm.
  • Vermont. Governor (1853-1854: Robinson). State of Vermont. By John S. Robinson. Governor. A Proclamation. ... I do, hereby, appoint Thursday, the eighth day of December next ... as a day of public thanksgiving and praise. ... Given under my hand and the seal of the state, in executive chamber, at Montpelier, this twenty first day of November ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three. [Proclamation. 1853 Nov. 21]

  • Vermont. Governor (1858-1860: Hall). State of Vermont. By Hiland Hall, governor. A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of November next, to be observed by the people of this state as a day of public thanksgiving and praise ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this thirty-first day of October ... one thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine. [Proclamation. 1859 Oct. 31]

  • Vermont. Governor (1861-1863: Holbrook). State of Vermont. By Frederick Holbrook, governor. A Proclamation. ... Thursday, the twenty-eighth of November, instant, to be observed by the people of this state as a day of thanksgiving ... Given under my hand ... at Montpelier, this eleventh of November ... one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. [Proclamation. 1861 Nov. 11]


    Virginia

  • Virginia. Governor (1779-1781: Jefferson). Proclamation Appointing a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer, November 11, 1779. Papers of Thomas Jefferson, v. 3, pp. 177-179.

    WHEREAS the Honourable the General Congress, impressed with a grateful sense of the goodness of Almighty God, in blessing the greater part of this extensive continent with plentiful harvests, crowning our arms with repeated successes, conducting us hitherto safely through the perils with which we have been encompassed and manifesting in multiplied instances his divine care of these infant states, hath thought proper by their act of the 20th day of October last, to recommend to the several states that Thursday the 9th of December next be appointed a day of publick and solemn thanksgiving and prayer, which act is in these words, to wit.

    "Whereas it becomes us humbly to approach the throne of Almighty God, with gratitude and praise, for the wonders which his goodness has wrought in conducting our forefathers to this western world; for his protection to them and to their posterity, amidst difficulties and dangers; for raising us their children from deep distress, to be numbered among the nations of the earth; and for arming the hands of just and mighty Princes in our deliverance; and especially for that he hath been pleased to grant us the enjoyment of health and so to order the revolving seasons, that the earth hath produced her increase in abundance, blessing the labours of the husbandman, and spreading plenty through the land; that he hath prospered our arms and those of our ally, been a shield to our troops in the hour of danger, pointed their swords to victory, and led them in triumph over the bulwarks of the foe; that he hath gone with those who went out into the wilderness against the savage tribes; that he hath stayed the hand of the spoiler, and turned back his meditated destruction; that he hath prospered our commerce, and given success to those who sought the enemy on the face of the deep; and above all, that he hath diffused the glorious light of the gospel, whereby, through the merits of our gracious Redeemer, we may become the heirs of his eternal glory. Therefore,

    Resolved, that it be recommended to the several states to appoint THURSDAY the 9th of December next, to be a day of publick and solemn THANKSGIVING to Almighty God, for his mercies, and of PRAYER, for the continuance of his favour and protection to these United States; to beseech him that he would be graciously pleased to influence our publick Councils, and bless them with wisdom from on high, with unanimity, firmness and success; that he would go forth with our hosts and crown our arms with victory; that he would grant to his church, the plentiful effusions of divine grace, and pour out his holy spirit on all Ministers of the gospel; that he would bless and prosper the means of education, and spread the light of christian knowledge through the remotest corners of the earth; that he would smile upon the labours of his people, and cause the earth to bring forth her fruits in abundance, that we may with gratitude and gladness enjoy them; that he would take into his holy protection, our illustrious ally, give him victory over his enemies, and render him finally great, as the father of his people, and the protector of the rights of mankind; that he would graciously be pleased to turn the hearts of our enemies, and to dispence the blessings of peace to contending nations.

    That he would in mercy look down upon us, pardon all our sins, and receive us into his favour; and finally, that he would establish the independance of these United States upon the basis of religion and virtue, and support and protect them in the enjoyment of peace, liberty and safety."

    I do therefore by authority from the General Assembly issue this my proclamation, hereby appointing Thursday the 9th day of December next, a day of publick and solemn thanksgiving and prayer to Almighty God, earnestly recommending to all the good people of this commonwealth, to set apart the said day for those purposes, and to the several Ministers of religion to meet their respective societies thereon, to assist them in their prayers, edify them with their discourses, and generally to perform the sacred duties of their function, proper for the occasion. Given under my hand and the seal of the commonwealth, at Williamsburg, this 11th day of November, in the year of our Lord, 1779, and in the fourth of the commonwealth.

    THOMAS JEFFERSON


    Wisconsin

  • Wisconsin. Governor (1858-1861: Randall). State of Wisconsin, Proclamation for Thanksgiving. Madison, 1860. 1 p.; 25 x 20 cm. [Proclamation. 1860 October 29]
    It is right that all Christian nations should praise the Ruler of the Universe for His wonderful goodness to the Children of Men.
    It is iminently proper that the people of this country should praise Him, for they are favored above all others, in their form of government, devised, under God, by the wisdom of their forefathers--in freedom to do all things that are right--in health, peace, prosperity--in a wonderful process of development which has already placed them in the foremost rank of the Nations of the World.
    The People of Wisconsin have extraordinary reason for thankfulness the present year. The peaceful labors of the husbandmen have been blessed in a most remarkable degree, and their barns and storehouses are overflowing with the abundance of the Harvest. Surely, "He filleth them with the finest of the wheat." Health has prevailed throughout our borders. Good order has everywhere reigned. The blessings of free education have been extended. All classes and professions have pursued their avocations with greater or less measure of success, under the protection of just and equal laws. If afflictions have come upon, or calamities overtaken us, the benign influences of Christian benevolence have hastened to dry the tears and ministered to the wants of the bereaved.
    Following time-honored custom, it is my privilege again to invite the people of Wisconsin to the observance of their annual festival of joy and gladness, and I do hereby appoint Thursday, the 29th day of November, 1860, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to the Almighty Ruler of the Universe.
    And I recommend that the people of the State, on that day, laying aside the cares of life, gather together in their solemn assemblies, and, in manner and form approved by their consciences, return their thanks to God for His great goodness to us as citizens of a country blessed, beyond others, with Civil and Religious Liberty, Educational Institutions. Peace and Prosperity; and especially for His overflowing blessings to the people of this Commonwealth in Abundant Harvests, Health, Social Comforts and Privileges, and for all that contributes to their happiness and well-being as communities and individuals.
    "Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with praise; be thankful unto Him and bless His name."
    When the feast is spread, and the tables groan with fatness, let not the poor be forgotten, nor any man found begging bread.
    In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, and caused the Great Seal of the {Begin inserted text}SEAL{End inserted text} State to be affixed.
    Done at Madison, this twenty-ninth day of October, 1860.
    By the Governor,
    ALEX. W. RANDALL.


    United States Continental Congress

  • United States. Continental Congress. Congressional Fast Day Proclamation, March 16, 1776. Text here. Congress proclaimed days of fasting and of thanksgiving annually throughout the Revolutionary War. This Proclamation by Congress set May 17, 1776, as a "day of Humiliation, Fasting and Prayer" throughout the colonies. Congress urges its fellow citizens to "confess and bewail our manifold sins and transgressions, and by a sincere repentance and amendment of life, appease his [God's] righteous displeasure, and through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, obtain his pardon and forgiveness." Massachusetts ordered a "suitable Number" of these Proclamations be printed so "that each of the religious Assemblies in this Colony, may be furnished with a Copy of the same" and added the motto "God Save This People" as a substitute for "God Save the King."

  • United States. Continental Congress. Recommendation of a day of Thanksgiving. November 1, 1777. Also, 1 sheet, (2 pp.). Lancaster [Pa.]: Printed by Francis Bailey, [1777].

    Forasmuch as it is the indispensable duty of all men to adore the superintending providence of Almighty God; to acknowledge with gratitude their obligation to him for benefits received, and to implore such farther blessings as they stand in need of; and it having pleased him in his abundant mercy not only to continue to us the innumerable bounties of his common providence, but also to smile upon us in the prosecution of a just and necessary war, for the defence and establishment of our unalienable rights and liberties; particularly in that he hath been pleased in so great a measure to prosper the means used for the support of our troops and to crown our arms with most signal success: It is therefore recommended to the legislative or executive powers of these United States, to set apart Thursday, the eighteenth day of December next, for solemn thanksgiving and praise; that with one heart1 and one voice the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts, and consecrate themselves to the service of their divine benefactor; and that together with their sincere acknowledgments and offerings, they may join the penitent confession of their manifold sins, whereby they had forfeited every favour, and their humble and earnest supplication that it may please God, through the merits of Jesus Christ, mercifully to forgive and blot them out of remembrance; that it may please him graciously to afford his blessing on the governments of these states respectively, and prosper the public council of the whole; to inspire our commanders both by land and sea, and all under them, with that wisdom and fortitude which may render them fit instruments, under the providence of Almighty God, to secure for these United States the greatest of all human blessings, independence and peace; that it may please him to prosper the trade and manufactures of the people and the labour of the husbandman, that our land may yet yield its increase; to take schools and seminaries of education, so necessary for cultivating the principles of true liberty, virtue and piety, under his nurturing hand, and to prosper the means of religion for the promotion and enlargement of that kingdom which consisteth "in righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Ghost."

    [Note 1: 1 The original read: "That at one time and with one voice."]

    And it is further recommended, that servile labour, and such recreation as, though at other times innocent, may be unbecoming the purpose of this appointment, be omitted on so solemn an occasion.2

    [Note 2: 2 This report, in the writing of Samuel Adams, is in the Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 24, folio 431.]

  • United States. Continental Congress. Recommendation for a day of Thanksgiving. November 17, 1778.
  • United States. Continental Congress. Recommendation for a day of Thanksgiving. October 20, 1779.

  • United States. Continental Congress. Resolution setting apart a day of Thanksgiving and prayer. October 18, 1780.
    Whereas it becomes us humbly to approach the throne of Almighty God, with gratitude and praise for the wonders which his goodness has wrought in conducting our forefathers to this western world; for his protection to them and to their posterity amidst difficulties and dangers; for raising us, their children, from deep distress to be numbered among the nations of the earth; and for arming the hands of just and mighty princes in our deliverance ; and especially for that he hath been pleased to grant us the enjoyment of health, and so to order the revolving seasons, that the earth hath produced her increase in abundance, blessing the labours of the husbandman, and spreading plenty through the land; that he hath prospered our arms and those of our ally; been a shield to our troops in the hour of danger, pointed their swords to victory, and led them in triumph over the bulwarks of the foe; that he hath gone with those who went out into the wilderness against the savage tribes; that he hath stayed the hand of the spoiler, and turned back his meditated destruction; that he hath prospered our commerce, and given success to those who fought the enemy on the face of the deep; and above all, that he hath diffused the glorious light of the gospel, whereby, through the merits of our gracious Redeemer, we may become the heirs of his eternal glory: therefore,
    Resolved, That it be recommended to the several States to appoint Thursday, the 9th of December next, to be a day of Public and Solemn Thanksgiving to Almighty God for his mercies, and of prayer for the continuance of his favour and protection to these United States; to beseech him that he would be graciously pleased to influence our public councils, and bless them with wisdom from on high, with unanimity, firmness and success; that he would go forth with our hosts and crown our armies with victory; that he would grant to his church the plentiful effusions of divine grace, and pour out his holy spirit on all ministers of the gospel; that he would bless and prosper the means of education, and spread the light of Christian knowledge through the remotest corners of the earth : that he would smile upon the labours of his people, and cause the earth to bring forth her fruits in abundance; that we may with gratitude and gladness enjoy them ; that he would take into his holy protection our illustrious ally, give him victory over his enemies, and render him signally great, as the father of his people and the protector of the rights of mankind; that he would graciously be pleased to turn the hearts of our enemies, and to dispense the blessings of peace to contending nations; that he would in mercy look down upon us, pardon our sins and receive us into his favour, and finally, that he would establish the independence of these United States upon the basis of religion and virtue, and support and protect them in the enjoyment of peace, liberty and safety.
    Done in Congress, the twentieth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-nine, and in the fourth year of the Independence of the United States of America.

  • United States. Continental Congress. Proclamation of a day of public Thanksgiving and prayer. October 26, 1781.

    Whereas, it hath pleased Almighty God, the supreme Disposer of all Events father of mercies, remarkably to assist and support the United States of America in their important struggle for liberty,against the long continued efforts of a powerful nation: it is the duty of all ranks to observe and thankfully acknowledge the interpositions of his Providence in their behalf. Through the whole of the contest, from its first rise to this time, the influence of divine Providence may be clearly perceived in many signal instances, of which we mention but a few.

    In revealing the councils of our enemies, when the discoveries were seasonable and important, and the means seemingly inadequate or fortuitous; in preserving and even improving the union of the several states, on the breach of which our enemies placed their greatest dependence; in increasing the number, and adding to the zeal and attachment of the friends of Liberty; in granting remarkable deliverances, and blessing us with the most signal success, when affairs seemed to have the most discouraging appearance; in raising up for us a powerful and generous ally, in one of the first of the European powers; in confounding the councils of our enemies, and suffering them to pursue such measures as have most directly contributed to frustrate their own desires and expectations; above all, in making their extreme cruelty of their officers and soldiers to the inhabitants of these states, when in their power, and their savage devastation of property, the very means of cementing our union, and adding vigor to every effort in opposition to them.

    And as we cannot help leading the good people of these states to a retrospect on the events which have taken place since the beginning of the war, so we beg recommend in a particular manner that they may observe and acknowledge to their observation, the goodness of God in the year now drawing to a conclusion: in which a mutiny in the American Army was not only happily appeased but became in its issue a pleasing and undeniable proof of the unalterable attachment of the people in general to the cause of liberty since great and real grievances only made them tumultuously seek redress while the abhorred the thoughts of going over to the enemy, in which the Confederation of the United States has been completed by the accession of all without exception in which there have been so many instances of prowess and success in our armies; particularly in the southern states, where, notwithstanding the difficulties with which they had to struggle, they have recovered the whole country which the enemy had overrun, leaving them only a post or two upon on or near the sea: in which we have been so powerfully and effectually assisted by our allies, while in all the conjunct operations the most perfect union and harmony has subsisted in the allied army: in which there has been so plentiful a harvest, and so great abundance of the fruits of the earth of every kind, as not only enables us easily to supply the wants of the army, but gives comfort and happiness to the whole people: and in which, after the success of our allies by sea, a General of the first Rank, with his whole army, has been captured by the allied forces under the direction of our illustrious Commander in Chief.

    It is therefore recommended to the several states to set apart the 13th day of December next, to be religiously observed as a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer; that all the people may assemble on that day, with grateful hearts, to celebrate the praises of our gracious Benefactor; to confess our manifold sins; to offer up our most fervent supplications to the God of all grace, that it may please Him to pardon our offences, and incline our hearts for the future to keep all his laws; to comfort and relieve all our brethren who are in distress or captivity; to prosper our husbandmen, and give success to all engaged in lawful commerce; to impart wisdom and integrity to our counsellors, judgment and fortitude to our officers and soldiers; to protect and prosper our illustrious ally, and favor our united exertions for the speedy establishment of a safe, honorable and lasting peace; to bless all seminaries of learning; and cause the knowledge of God to cover the earth, as the waters cover the seas.1

    [Note 1: 1 This report, in the writing of John Witherspoon, is in the Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 24, folio 463.]

  • United States. Continental Congress. Congressional Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, October 11, 1782. Text here. Congress set November 28, 1782, as a day of thanksgiving on which Americans were "to testify their gratitude to God for his goodness, by a cheerful obedience to his laws, and by promoting, each in his station, and by his influence, the practice of true and undefiled religion, which is the great foundation of public prosperity and national happiness."

  • United States. Continental Congress. Proclamation of a day of Thanksgiving. October 18, 1783.


    United States Congress

  • United States. House of Representatives. First Congress. Session I. September 25, 1789. Resolution requesting the President of the United States to Recommend a Day of Thanksgiving. Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States, 1789-1793; FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1789

  • United States. Senate. First Congress. Session I. September 26, 1789. Resolution requesting the President of the United States to Recommend a Day of thanksgiving. Journal of the Senate of the United States of America, 1789-1793; SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1789.

  • United States. Congress. Twelfth Congress. Session I. June 17, 1812. Resolution requesting the President of the United States to Recommend a Day of Public Humiliation and Prayer. Richard Peters, Counsellor at Law, editor. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845, Arranged in Chronological Order, withan Index to the Contents of Each Volume, and a Full General Index to the Whole Work, in the Concluding Volume. Volume 2 Extract. Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1845, p. 786.
    "It being a duty peculiarly incumbent in a time of public calamity and war, humbly and devoutly to acknowledge our dependence on Almighty God, and to implore his aid and protection:
    Therefore,
    Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That a joint committee of both Houses wait on the President of the United States, and request that he recommend a day of public humiliation and prayer to be observed by the people of the United States, with religious solemnity, and the offering of fervent supplications to Almighty God for the safety and welfare of these States, his blessing on their arms, and the speedy restoration of peace."


    United States Presidents

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington).
  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, November 30, 1777. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, White Marsh, November 30, 1777.
    Parole Northampton. Countersigns Greenland, Portsmouth.
    On the 25th of November instant, the Honorable Continental Congress passed the following resolve, vizt:
    Resolved. That General Washington be directed to publish in General orders, that Congress will speedily take into consideration the merits of such officers as have distinguished themselves by their intrepidity and their attention to the health and discipline of their men; and adopt such regulations as shall tend to introduce order and good discipline into the army, and to render the situation of the officers and soldiery, with respect to clothing and other necessaries, more eligible than it has hitherto been.
    Forasmuch as it is the indispensible duty of all men, to adore the superintending providence of Almighty God; to acknowledge with gratitude their obligations to him for benefits received, and to implore such further blessings as they stand in need of; and it having pleased him in his abundant mercy, not only to continue to us the innumerable bounties of his common providence, but also, to smile upon us in the prosecution of a just and necessary war, for the defence of our unalienable rights and liberties.78
    [Note 78: This preliminary statement was taken from the resolve of Congress of November 1 recommending the States to set apart a day of Thanksgiving. It was to Washington on November 7 and answered by him on November 10.]
    It is therefore recommended by Congress, that Thursday the 18th. day of December next be set apart for Solemn Thanksgiving and Praise; that at one time, and with one voice, the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts, and consecrate themselves to the service of their divine benefactor; and that, together with their sincere acknowledgements and offerings they may join the penitent confession of their sins; and supplications for such further blessings as they stand in need of. The Chaplains will properly notice this recommendation, that the day of thanksgiving may be duly observed in the army, agreeably to the intentions of Congress.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, December 17, 1777. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, at the Gulph, December 17, 1777.
    Parole Warwick. Countersigns Woodbridge, Winchester.
    The Commander in Chief with the highest satisfaction expresses his thanks to the officers and soldiers for the fortitude and patience with which they have sustained the fatigues of the Campaign. Altho' in some instances we unfortunately failed, yet upon the whole Heaven hath smiled on our Arms and crowned them with signal success; and we may upon the best grounds conclude, that by a spirited continuance of the measures necessary for our defence we shall finally obtain the end of our Warfare, Independence, Liberty and Peace. These axe blessings worth contending for at every hazard. But we hazard nothing. The power of America alone, duly exerted, would have nothing to dread from the force of Britain. Yet we stand not wholly upon our ground. France yields us every aid we ask, and there are reasons to believe the period is not very distant, when she will take a more active part, by declaring war against the British Crown. Every motive therefore, irresistably urges us, nay commands us, to a firm and manly perseverance in our opposition to our cruel oppressors, to slight difficulties, endure hardships, and contemn every danger. The General ardently wishes it were now in his power, to conduct the troops into the best winter quarters. But where are these to be found? Should we retire to the interior parts of the State, we should find them crowded with virtuous citizens, who, sacrificing their all, have left Philadelphia, and fled thither for protection. To their distresses humanity forbids us to add. This is not all, we should leave a vast extent of fertile country to be despoiled and ravaged by the enemy, from which they would draw vast supplies, and where many of our firm friends would be exposed to all the miseries of the most insulting and wanton depredation. A train of evils might be enumerated, but these will suffice. These considerations make it indispensibly necessary for the army to take such a position, as will enable it most effectually to prevent distress and to give the most extensive security; and in that position we must make ourselves the best shelter in our power. With activity and diligence Huts may be erected that will be warm and dry. In these the troops will be compact, more secure against surprises than if in a divided state and at hand to protect the country. These cogent reasons have determined the General to take post in the neighbourhood of this camp; and influenced by them, he persuades himself, that the officers and soldiers, with one heart, and one mind, will resolve to surmount every difficulty, with a fortitude and patience, be coming their profession, and the sacred cause in which they are engaged. He himself will share in the hardship, and partake of every inconvenience.
    To morrow being the day set apart by the Honorable Congress for public Thanksgiving and Praise; and duty calling us devoutely to express our grateful acknowledgements to God for the manifold blessings he has granted us. The General directs that the army remain in it's present quarters, and that the Chaplains perform divine service with their several Corps and brigades. And earnestly exhorts, all officers and soldiers, whose absence is not indispensibly necessary, to attend with reverence the solemnities of the day.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). George Washington to Israel Evans, March 13, 1778. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    [Note 19: Chaplain to Poor's New Hampshire brigade.]
    Head Qrs. Valley-forge, March 13, 1778.
    Revd. Sir: Your favor of the 17th. Ulto., inclosing the discourse which you delivered on the 18th. of December; the day set a part for a general thanksgiving; to Genl. Poors Brigade, never came to my hands till yesterday.20
    [Note 20: This sermon (24 pages) was printed by Francis Bailey, at Lancaster, Pa., in 1778. It was, probably, one of these imprints which Evans sent to Washington.]
    I have read this performance with equal attention and pleasure, and at the same time that I admire, and feel the force of the reasoning which you have displayed through the whole, it is more especially incumbent upon me to thank you for the honorable, but partial mention you have made of my character; and to assure you, that it will ever be the first wish of my heart to aid your pious endeavours to inculcate a due sense of the dependance we ought to place in that all wise and powerful Being on whom alone our success depends; and moreover, to assure you, that with respect and regard, I am, etc.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, May 5, 1778. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, V. Forge, Tuesday, May 5, 1778.
    Parole Europe. Countersigns Exeter, Eltham.
    AFTER ORDERS
    It having pleased the Almighty ruler of the Universe propitiously to defend the Cause of the United American-States and finally by raising us up a powerful Friend among the Princes of the Earth to establish our liberty and Independence up lasting foundations, it becomes us to set apart a day for gratefully acknowledging the divine Goodness and celebrating the important Event which we owe to his benign Interposition.
    The several Brigades are to be assembled for this Purpose at nine o'Clock tomorrow morning when their Chaplains will communicate the Intelligence contain'd in the Postscript to the Pennsylvania Gazette of the 2nd. instant and offer up a thanksgiving and deliver a discourse suitable to the Occasion.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, December 22, 1778. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, Middle Brook, Tuesday, December 22, 1778.
    Parole Narraganset. Countersigns Otis, Portsmouth.
    The Honorable The Congress having been pleased by their Proclamation of the 21st. of November last to appoint Wednesday the 30th. instant as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise for the great and numerous Providential Mercies experienced by the People of These States in the course of the present War, the same is to be religiously observed throughout the Army in the manner therein directed, and the different Chaplains will prepare discourses suited to the Occasion.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, April 12, 1779. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, Middle Brook, Monday, April 12, 1779.
    Parole Tecklenburgh. Countersigns Ternrock, Trim.
    All the Brigade Inspectors and Adjutants of Regiments to attend at the Orderly Office tomorrow morning ten o'clock to copy the 5th. and 6th. chapters of the Baron Steuben's instructions which are to be strictly adhered to and immediately put in practice: The hours of exercise to be from 6 to 8 o'clock in the morning and from 4 to 6 in the afternoon.
    The Honorable the Congress having recommended it to the United States to set apart Thursday the 6th. day of May next to be observed as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, to acknowledge the gracious interpositions of Providence; to deprecate deserved punishment for our Sins and Ingratitude, to unitedly implore the Protection of Heaven; Success to our Arms and the Arms of our Ally: The Commander in Chief enjoins a religious observance of said day and directs the Chaplains to prepare discourses proper for the occasion; strictly forbiding all recreations and unnecessary labor.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, November 27, 1779. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, Moore's House, Saturday, November 27, 1779.
    Parole Landaft. Countersigns Lexington, Leeds.
    The Honorable the Congress has been pleased to pass the following Proclamation.
    Whereas it becomes us humbly to approach the throne of Almighty God, with gratitude and praise for the wonders which his goodness has wrought in conducting our fore-fathers to this western world; for his protection to them and to their posterity amid difficulties and dangers; for raising us, their children, from deep distress to be numbered among the nations of the earth; and for arming the hands of just and mighty princes in our deliverance; and especially for that he hath been pleased to grant us the enjoyment of health, and so to order the revolving seasons, that the earth hath produced her increase in abundance, blessing the labors of the husbandmen, and spreading plenty through the land; that he hath prospered our arms and those of our ally; been a shield to our troops in the hour of danger, pointed their swords to victory and led them in triumph over the bulwarks of the foe; that he hath gone with those who went out into the wilderness against the savage tribes; that he hath stayed the hand of the spoiler, and turned back his meditated destruction; that he hath prospered our commerce, and given success to those who sought the enemy on the face of the deep; and above all, that he hath diffused the glorious light of the gospel, whereby, through the merits of our gracious Redeemer, we may become the heirs of his eternal glory: therefore, RESOLVED, That it be recommended to the several states, to appoint Thursday, the 9th of December next, to be a day of public and solemn thanksgiving to Almighty God for his mercies, and of prayer for the continuance of his favor and protection to these United States; to beseech him that he would be graciously pleased to influence our public councils, and bless them with wisdom from on high, with unanimity, firmness, and success; that he would go forth with our hosts and crown our arms with victory; that he would grant to his church the plentiful effusions of divine grace, and pour out his holy spirit on all ministers of the gospel; that he would bless and prosper the means of education, and spread the light of christian knowledge through the remotest corners of the earth; that he would smile upon the labours of his people and cause the earth to bring forth her fruits in abundance; that we may with gratitude and gladness enjoy them; that he would take into his holy protection our illustrious ally, give him victory over his enemies, and render him signally great, as the father of his people and the protector of the rights of mankind; that he would graciously be pleased to turn the hearts of our enemies, and to dispense the blessings of peace to contending nations; that he would in mercy look down upon us, pardon our sins and receive us into his favor, and finally, that he would establish the independence of these United States upon the basis of religion and virtue, and support and protect them in the enjoyment of peace, liberty and safety.33
    [Note 33: In the General Orders this resolve was condensed by sundry omissions.]
    A strict observance to be paid by the Army to this Proclamation and the Chaplains are to prepare and deliver discourses suitable to it.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). George Washington, October 20, 1781, General Orders. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor. Head Quarters Before York, Saturday, October 20, 1781.

    Divine Service is to be performed tomorrow in the several Brigades or Divisions.
    The Commander in Chief earnestly recommends that the troops not on duty should universally attend with that seriousness of Deportment and gratitude of Heart which the recognition of such reiterated and astonishing interpositions of Providence demand of us.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). General Orders, November 14, 1782. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.
    Head Quarters, Newburgh, Thursday, November 14, 1782.
    Parole Quebec. Countersigns Rockingham, Shrewsbury.
    Congress having been pleased to set a part Thursday the 28th. instant as a day of Solemn thanksgiving to god for all his Mercies, The General desires it may be most religiously observed by the army; and that the Chaplains will prepare discourses suitable to the occasion.

  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). The Thanksgiving Proclamation, New York, October 3, 1789.
  • United States. President (1789-1797: Washington). To the Ministers and Ruling Elders delegated to represent the Churches in Massachusetts and New-Hampshire, which compose the first Presbytery of the Eastward. Published in Massachusetts Centinel, vol. XII, iss. 24, December 5, 1789, page 96.

    "The tribute of thanksgiving, which you offer to the gracious Father of Lights, for his inspiration of our publick councils with wisdom and firmness to complete the National Constitution, is worthy of men, who, devoted to the pious purposes of religion, desire their accomplishment by such means as advance the temporal happiness of their fellow men. And, here, I am persuaded, you will permit me to observe, that the path of true piety is so plain, as to require but little political direction.
    "To this consideration we ought to ascribe the absence of any regulation respecting religion from the Magna Charta of our country, to the guidance of the Ministers of the Gospel, this important object is, perhaps, more properly committed. It will be your care to instruct the ignorant, and to reclaim the devious: And in the progress of morality and science, to which our Government will give every furtherance, we may confidently expect the advancement of true religion, and the completion of our happiness.
    "I pray the munificent Rewarder of virtue, that your agency in this work, may receive its compensation here and hereafter."

  • George Washington - 01/01/1795 Proclamation - Thanksgiving Day - 1795. This is the text of a proclamation for a day of Public Thanksgiving and Prayer, issued by George Washington when he served as President. It was published in the Columbian Centinel on January 1, 1795.

    When we review the calamities, which afflict so many other nations, the present condition of the United States affords much matter of consolation and satisfaction. Our exemption hitherto from foreign war -- an increasing prospect of the continuance of that exemption -- the great degree of internal tranquility we have enjoyed -- the recent confirmation of that tranquility by the suppression of an insurrection which so wantonly threatened it -- the happy course of public affairs in general -- the unexampled prosperity of all classes of our citizens; are circumstances which peculiarly mark our situation with indications of the Divine beneficence towards us. In such a state of things it is, in an especial manner, our duty as people, with devout reverence and affectionate gratitude, to acknowledge our many and great obligations to Almighty God and to implore Him to continue and confirm the blessings we experience.

    Deeply penetrated with this sentiment, I, George Washington, President of the United States, do recommend to all religious societies and denominations, and to all persons whomsoever, within the United States, to set apart and observe Thursday, the nineteenth day of February next, as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer: and on that day to meet together and render their sincere and hearty thanks to the great Ruler of nations for the manifold and signal mercies which distinguish our lot as a nation. particularly for the possession of constitutions of government which unite and, by their union, establish liberty with order; for the preservation of peace, foreign and domestic; and for the seasonable control, which has been given to a spirit of disorder, in the suppression of the late insurrection; and generally for the prosperous course of our affairs, public and private; and, at the same time, humbly and fervently to beseech the kind Author of these blessings. graciously to prolong them to us -- to imprint on our hearts a deep and solemn sense of our obligations to Him for them -- to teach us rightly to estimate their immense value -- to preserve us from the arrogance of prosperity and from hazarding the advantages we enjoy by delusive pursuits -- to dispose us to merit the continuance of His favors by not abusing them, by our gratitude for them, and by a correspondent conduct as citizens and as men -- to render this country, more and more, a propitious asylum for the unfortunate of other countries -- to extend among us true and useful knowledge -- to diffuse and establish habits of sobriety, order, morality, and piety -- and, finally, to impart all blessings we possess or ask for ourselves, to the whole family of mankind." ...

  • United States. President (1797-1801: Adams, John). John Adams to Abigail Adams, October 26, 1777. From Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 8, September 19, 1777 - January 31, 1778.

    "Congress will appoint a Thanksgiving, and one Cause of it ought to be that the Glory of turning the Tide of Arms, is not immediately due to the Commander in Chief, nor to southern Troops. If it had been, Idolatry, and Adulation would have been unbounded, so excessive as to endanger our Liberties for what I know.

    "Now We can allow a certain Citizen to be wise, virtuous, and good, without thinking him a Deity or a saviour."

  • United States. President (1797-1801: Adams, John). By the President of the United States of America, a Proclamation. March 23, 1798. Note: This is a fasting Proclamation, not a thanksgiving Proclamation, but thanksgiving to God is acknowledged.
    As the safety and prosperity of nations ultimately and essentially depend on the protection and the blessing of Almighty God, and the national acknowledgment of this truth is not only an indispensable duty which the people owe to Him, but a duty whose natural influence is favorable to the promotion of that morality and piety without which social happiness can not exist nor the blessings of a free government be enjoyed; and as this duty, at all times incumbent, is so especially in seasons of difficulty or of danger, when existing or threatening calamities, the just judgments of God against prevalent iniquity, are a loud call to repentance and reformation; and as the United States of America are at present placed in a hazardous and afflictive situation by the unfriendly disposition, conduct, and demands of a foreign power, evinced by repeated refusals to receive our messengers of reconciliation and peace, by depredation on our commerce, and the infliction of injuries on very many of our fellow-citizens while engaged in their lawful business on the seas--under these considerations it has appeared to me that the duty of imploring the mercy and benediction of Heaven on our country demands at this time a special attention from its inhabitants.
    I have therefore thought fit to recommend, and I do hereby recommend, that Wednesday, the 9th day of May next, be observed throughout the United States as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer; that the citizens of these States, abstaining on that day from their customary worldly occupations, offer their devout addresses to the Father of Mercies agreeably to those forms or methods which they have severally adopted as the most suitable and becoming; that all religious congregations do, with the deepest humility, acknowledge before God the manifold sins and transgressions with which we are justly chargeable as individuals and as a nation, beseeching Him at the same time, of His infinite grace, through the Redeemer of the World, freely to remit all our offenses, and to incline us by His Holy Spirit to that sincere repentance and reformation which may afford us reason to hope for his inestimable favor and heavenly benediction; that it be made the subject of particular and earnest supplication that our country may be protected from all the dangers which threaten it; that our civil and religious privileges may be preserved inviolate and perpetuated to the latest generations; that our public councils and magistrates may be especially enlightened and directed at this critical period; that the American people may be united in those bonds of amity and mutual confidence and inspired with that vigor and fortitude by which they have in times past been so highly distinguished and by which they have obtained such invaluable advantages; that the health of the inhabitants of our land may be preserved, and their agriculture, commerce, fisheries, arts, and manufactures be blessed and prospered; that the principles of genuine piety and sound morality may influence the minds and govern the lives of every description of our citizens, and that the blessings of peace, freedom, and pure religion may be speedily extended to all the nations of the earth.
    And finally, I recommend that on the said day the duties of humiliation and prayer be accompanied by fervent thanksgiving to the Bestower of Every Good Gift, not only for His having hitherto protected and preserved the people of these United States in the independent enjoyment of their religious and civil freedom, but also for having prospered them in a wonderful progress of population, and for conferring on them many and great favors conducive to the happiness and prosperity of a nation.
    Given under my hand and the seal of the United States of America, at Philadelphia, this 23d day of March, A. D. 1798, and of the Independence of the said States the twenty-second.
    JOHN ADAMS.
    By the President: TIMOTHY PICKERING, Secretary of State.

  • United States. President (1797-1801: Adams, John). By the President of the United States of America, a Proclamation. March 6, 1799. Note: This is a fasting Proclamation, not a thanksgiving Proclamation, but thanksgiving to God is acknowledged.
    As no truth is more clearly taught in the Volume of Inspiration, nor any more fully demonstrated by the experience of all ages, than that a deep sense and a due acknowledgment of the governing providence of a Supreme Being and of the accountableness of men to Him as the searcher of hearts and righteous distributer of rewards and punishments are conducive equally to the happiness and rectitude of individuals and to the well-being of communities; as it is also most reasonable in itself that men who are made capable of social acts and relations, who owe their improvements to the social state, and who derive their enjoyments from it, should, as a society, make their acknowledgments of dependence and obligation to Him who hath endowed them with these capacities and elevated them in the scale of existence by these distinctions; as it is likewise a plain dictate of duty and a strong sentiment of nature that in circumstances of great urgency and seasons of imminent danger earnest and particular supplications should be made to Him who is able to defend or to destroy; as, moreover, the most precious interests of the people of the United States are still held in jeopardy by the hostile designs and insidious acts of a foreign nation, as well as by the dissemination among them of those principles, subversive of the foundations of all religious, moral, and social obligations, that have produced incalculable mischief and misery in other countries; and as, in fine, the observance of special seasons for public religious solemnities is happily calculated to avert the evils which we ought to deprecate and to excite to the performance of the duties which we ought to discharge by calling and fixing the attention of the people at large to the momentous truths already recited, by affording opportunity to teach and inculcate them by animating devotion and giving to it the character of a national act:

    For these reasons I have thought proper to recommend, and I do hereby recommend accordingly, that Thursday, the 25th day of April next, be observed throughout the United States of America as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer; that the citizens on that day abstain as far as may be from their secular occupations, devote the time to the sacred duties of religion in public and in private; that they call to mind our numerous offenses against the Most High God, confess them before Him with the sincerest penitence, implore His pardoning mercy, through the Great Mediator and Redeemer, for our past transgressions, and that through the grace of His Holy Spirit we may be disposed and enabled to yield a more suitable obedience to His righteous requisitions in time to come; that He would interpose to arrest the progress of that impiety and licentiousness in principle and practice so offensive to Himself and so ruinous to mankind; that He would make us deeply sensible that "righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people;" that He would turn us from our transgressions and turn His displeasure from us; that He would withhold us from unreasonable discontent, from disunion, faction, sedition, and insurrection; that He would preserve our country from the desolating sword; that He would save our cities and towns from a repetition of those awful pestilential visitations under which they have lately suffered so severely, and that the health of our inhabitants generally may be precious in His sight; that He would favor us with fruitful seasons and so bless the labors of the husbandman as that there may be food in abundance for man and beast; that He would prosper our commerce, manufactures, and fisheries, and give success to the people in all their lawful industry and enterprise; that He would smile on our colleges, academies, schools, and seminaries of learning, and make them nurseries of sound science, morals, and religion; that He would bless all magistrates, from the highest to the lowest, give them the true spirit of their station, make them a terror to evil doers and a praise to them that do well; that He would preside over the councils of the nation at this critical period, enlighten them to a just discernment of the public interest, and save them from mistake, division, and discord; that He would make succeed our preparations for defense and bless our armaments by land and by sea; that He would put an end to the effusion of human blood and the accumulation of human misery among the contending nations of the earth by disposing them to justice, to equity, to benevolence, and to peace; and that he would extend the blessings of knowledge, of true liberty, and of pure and undefiled religion throughout the world.
    And I do also recommend that with these acts of humiliation, penitence, and prayer fervent thanksgiving to the Author of All Good be united for the countless favors which He is still continuing to the people of the United States, and which render their condition as a nation eminently happy when compared with the lot of others.
    Given etc.
    JOHN ADAMS.

  • United States. President (1809-1817. Madison). Proclamation, July 9th, 1812. Alternate source: James D. Richardson, editor. A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents. Volume 1 of 11. Part 4: James Madison, March 4, 1809 to March 4, 1817. Project Gutenberg. [From Annals of Congress, Twelfth Congress, part 2, p. 2224.]
    By The President of the United States of America.
    A Proclamation.
    Whereas the Congress of the United States, by a joint resolution of the two Houses, have signified a request that a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States with religious solemnity as a day of public humiliation and prayer; and
    Whereas such a recommendation will enable the several religious denominations and societies so disposed to offer at one and the same time their common vows and adorations to Almighty God on the solemn occasion produced by the war in which He has been pleased to permit the injustice of a foreign power to involve these United States:
    I do therefore recommend the third Thursday in August next as a convenient day to be set apart for the devout purposes of rendering the Sovereign of the Universe and the Benefactor of Mankind the public homage due to His holy attributes; of acknowledging the transgressions which might justly provoke the manifestations of His divine displeasure; of seeking His merciful forgiveness and His assistance in the great duties of repentance and amendment, and especially of offering fervent supplications that in the present season of calamity and war He would take the American people under His peculiar care and protection; that He would guide their public councils, animate their patriotism, and bestow His blessing on their arms; that He would inspire all nations with a love of justice and of concord and with a reverence for the unerring precept of our holy religion to do to others as they would require that others should do to them; and, finally, that, turning the hearts of our enemies from the violence and injustice which sway their councils against us, He would hasten a restoration of the blessings of peace.
    [SEAL.]
    Given at Washington, the 9th day of July, A.D. 1812.
    JAMES MADISON.

  • United States. President (1809-1817. Madison). Proclamation, July 23rd, 1813.
    Whereas the Congress of the United States, by a joint resolution of the two Houses, have signified a request that a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States with religious solemnity as a day of public humiliation and prayer; and
    Whereas in times of public calamity such as that of the war brought on the United States by the injustice of a foreign government it is especially becoming that the hearts of all should be touched with the same and the eyes of all be turned to that Almighty Power in whose hand are the welfare and the destiny of nations:
    I do therefore issue this my Proclamation, recommending to all who shall be piously disposed to unite their hearts and voices in addressing at one and the same time their vows and adorations to the Great Parent and Sovereign of the Universe that they assemble on the second Thursday of September next in their respective religious congregations to render Him thanks for the many blessings He has bestowed on the people of the United States; that He has blessed them with a land capable of yielding all the necessaries and requisites of human life, with ample means for convenient exchanges with foreign countries; that He has blessed the labors employed in its cultivation and improvement; that He is now blessing the exertions to extend and establish the arts and manufactures which will secure within ourselves supplies too important to remain dependent on the precarious policy or the peaceable dispositions of other nations, and particularly that He has blessed the United States with a political Constitution rounded on the will and authority of the whole people and guaranteeing to each individual security, not only of his person and his property, but of those sacred rights of conscience so essential to his present happiness and so dear to his future hopes; that with those expressions of devout thankfulness be joined supplications to the same Almighty Power that He would look down with compassion on our infirmities; that He would pardon our manifold transgressions and awaken and strengthen in all the wholesome purposes of repentance and amendment; that in this season of trial and calamity He would preside in a particular manner over our public councils and inspire all citizens with a love of their country and with those fraternal affections and that mutual confidence which have so happy a tendency to make us safe at home and respected abroad; and that as He was graciously pleased heretofore to smile on our struggles against the attempts of the Government of the Empire of which these States then made a part to wrest from them the rights and privileges to which they were entitled in common with every other part and to raise them to the station of an independent and sovereign people, so He would now be pleased in like manner to bestow His blessing on our arms in resisting the hostile and persevering efforts of the same power to degrade us on the ocean, the common inheritance of all, from rights and immunities belonging and essential to the American people as a coequal member of the great community of independent nations; and that, inspiring our enemies with moderation, with justice, and with that spirit of reasonable accommodation which our country has continued to manifest, we may be enabled to beat our swords into plowshares and to enjoy in peace every man the fruits of his honest industry and the rewards of his lawful enterprise.
    If the public homage of a people can ever be worthy the favorable regard of the Holy and Omniscient Being to whom it is addressed, it must be that in which those who join in it are guided only by their free choice, by the impulse of their hearts and the dictates of their consciences; and such a spectacle must be interesting to all Christian nations as proving that religion, that gift of Heaven for the good of man, freed from all coercive edicts, from that unhallowed connection with the powers of this world which corrupts religion into an instrument or an usurper of the policy of the state, and making no appeal but to reason, to the heart, and to the conscience, can spread its benign influence everywhere and can attract to the divine altar those freewill offerings of humble supplication, thanksgiving, and praise which alone can be acceptable to Him whom no hypocrisy can deceive and no forced sacrifices propitiate.
    Upon these principles and with these views the good people of the United States are invited, in conformity with the resolution aforesaid, to dedicate the day above named to the religious solemnities therein recommended.
    Given at Washington, this 23d day of July, A. D. 1813.
    JAMES MADISON.

  • United States. President (1809-1817. Madison). Proclamation, March 4, 1815. Alternate source: James D. Richardson, editor. A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents. Volume 1 of 11. Part 4: James Madison, March 4, 1809 to March 4, 1817. Project Gutenberg.
    By the President of the United States of America.
    A Proclamation.
    The Senate and House of Representatives of the United States have by a joint resolution signified their desire that a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States with religious solemnity as a day of thanksgiving and of devout acknowledgments to Almighty God for His great goodness manifested in restoring to them the blessing of peace.
    No people ought to feel greater obligations to celebrate the goodness of the Great Disposer of Events and of the Destiny of Nations than the people of the United States. His kind providence originally conducted them to one of the best portions of the dwelling place allotted for the great family of the human race. He protected and cherished them under all the difficulties and trials to which they were exposed in their early days. Under His fostering care their habits, their sentiments, and their pursuits prepared them for a transition in due time to a state of independence and self-government. In the arduous struggle by which it was attained they were distinguished by multiplied tokens of His benign interposition. During the interval which succeeded He reared them into the strength and endowed them with the resources which have enabled them to assert their national rights and to enhance their national character in another arduous conflict, which is now so happily terminated by a peace and reconciliation with those who have been our enemies. And to the same Divine Author of Every Good and Perfect Gift we are indebted for all those privileges and advantages, religious as well as civil, which are so richly enjoyed in this favored land.
    It is for blessings such as these, and more especially for the restoration of the blessing of peace, that I now recommend that the second Thursday in April next be set apart as a day on which the people of every religious denomination may in their solemn assemblies unite their hearts and their voices in a freewill offering to their Heavenly Benefactor of their homage of thanksgiving and of their songs of praise.
    [SEAL.]
    Given at the city of Washington on the 4th day of March, A.D. 1815, and of the Independence of the United States the thirty-ninth.
    JAMES MADISON.

  • United States. President (1829-1837: Jackson). .

  • United States. President (1841-1845: Tyler). Second Annual Message, December 6, 1842.
    To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States: We have continued reason to express our profound gratitude to the Great Creator of All Things for numberless benefits conferred upon us as a people. Blessed with genial seasons, the husbandman has his garners filled with abundance, and the necessaries of life, not to speak of its luxuries, abound in every direction. While in some other nations steady and industrious labor can hardly find the means of subsistence, the greatest evil which we have to encounter is a surplus of production beyond the home demand, which seeks, and with difficulty finds, a partial market in other regions. The health of the country, with partial exceptions, has for the past year been well preserved, and under their free and wise institutions the United States are rapidly advancing toward the consummation of the high destiny which an overruling Providence seems to have marked out for them. Exempt from domestic convulsion and at peace with all the world, we are left free to consult as to the best means of securing and advancing the happiness of the people. Such are the circumstances under which you now assemble in your respective chambers and which should lead us to unite in praise and thanksgiving to that great Being who made us and who preserves us as a nation. ...

  • United States. President (1849-1850: Taylor). Annual Message, December 4, 1949.
    Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives: Sixty years have elapsed since the establishment of this Government, and the Congress of the United States again assembles to legislate for an empire of freemen. The predictions of evil prophets, who formerly pretended to foretell the downfall of our institutions, are now remembered only to be derided, and the United States of America at this moment present to the world the most stable and permanent Government on earth.
    Such is the result of the labors of those who have gone before us. Upon Congress will eminently depend the future maintenance of our system of free government and the transmission of it unimpaired to posterity.
    We are at peace with all the other nations of the world, and seek to maintain our cherished relations of amity with them. During the past year we have been blessed by a kind Providence with an abundance of the fruits of the earth, and although the destroying angel for a time visited extensive portions of our territory with the ravages of a dreadful pestilence, yet the Almighty has at length deigned to stay his hand and to restore the inestimable blessing of general health to a people who have acknowledged His power, deprecated His wrath, and implored His merciful protection.
    While enjoying the benefits of amicable intercourse with foreign nations, we have not been insensible to the distractions and wars which have prevailed in other quarters of the world. It is a proper theme of thanksgiving to Him who rules the destinies of nations that we have been able to maintain amidst all these contests an independent and neutral position toward all belligerent powers.
    ... As indispensable to the preservation of our system of self-government, the independence of the representatives of the States and the people is guaranteed by the Constitution, and they owe no responsibility to any human power but their constituents. By holding the representative responsible only to the people, and exempting him from all other influences, we elevate the character of the constituent and quicken his sense of responsibility to his country. It is under these circumstances only that the elector can feel that in the choice of the lawmaker he is himself truly a component part of the sovereign power of the nation. With equal care we should study to defend the rights of the executive and judicial departments. Our Government can only be preserved in its purity by the suppression and entire elimination of every claim or tendency of one coordinate branch to encroachment upon another. With the strict observance of this rule and the other injunctions of the Constitution, with a sedulous inculcation of that respect and love for the Union of the States which our fathers cherished and enjoined upon their children, and with the aid of that overruling Providence which has so long and so kindly guarded our liberties and institutions, we may reasonably expect to transmit them, with their innumerable blessings, to the remotest posterity. Z. TAYLOR.

  • United States. President (1857-1861: Buchanan). Proclamation - Humiliation, Fasting, and Prayer - 1860. [Proclamation 12/14/1860]

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). Executive Order for Day of Thanksgiving, November 27, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 5, edited by Roy P. Basler. Also here.
    "The Municipal authorities of Washington and Georgetown in this District, have appointed tomorrow, the 28th. instant, as a day of thanksgiving, the several Department will on that occasion be closed, in order that the officers of the government may partake in the ceremonies."
    ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). Proclamation of Thanksgiving for Victories, April 10, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 5, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 185-186.

    By the President of the United States of America.
    A Proclamation.
    It has pleased Almighty God to vouchsafe signal victories to the land and naval forces engaged in suppressing an internal rebellion, and at the same time to avert from our country the dangers of foreign intervention and invasion.
    It is therefore recommended to the People of the United States that, at their next weekly assemblages in their accustomed places of public worship which shall occur after notice of this Proclamation shall have been received, they especially acknowledge and render thanks to our Heavenly Father for these inestimable blessings; that they then and there implore spiritual consolations in behalf of all who have been brought into affliction by the casualties and calamities of sedition and civil war, and that they reverently invoke the Divine Guidance for our national counsels, to the end that they may speedily result in the restoration of peace, harmony, and unity throughout our borders, and hasten the establishment of fraternal relations among all the countries of the earth.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington, this tenth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-sixth.

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). Proclamation of Thanksgiving, July 15, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 6, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 332-333. Also here.

    By the President of the United States of America.
    A Proclamation.
    It has pleased Almighty God to hearken to the supplications and prayers of an afflicted people, and to vouchsafe to the army and the navy of the United States victories on land and on the sea so signal and so effective as to furnish reasonable grounds for augmented confidence that the Union of these States will be maintained, their constitution preserved, and their peace and prosperity permanently restored. But these victories have been accorded not without sacrifices of life, limb, health and liberty incurred by brave, loyal and patriotic citizens. Domestic affliction in every part of the country follows in the train of these fearful bereavements. It is meet and right to recognize and confess the presence of the Almighty Father and the power of His Hand equally in these triumphs and in these sorrows:
    Now, therefore, be it known that I do set apart Thursday the 6th. day of August next, to be observed as a day for National Thanksgiving, Praise and Prayer, and I invite the People of the United States to assemble on that occasion in their customary places of worship, and in the forms approved by their own consciences, render the homage due to the Divine Majesty, for the wonderful things he has done in the Nation's behalf, and invoke the influence of His Holy Spirit to subdue the anger, which has produced, and so long sustained a needless and cruel rebellion, to change the hearts of the insurgents, to guide the counsels of the Government with wisdom adequate to so great a national emergency, and to visit with tender care and consolation throughout the length and breadth of our land all those who, through the vicissitudes of marches, voyages, battles and sieges, have been brought to suffer in mind, body or estate, and finally to lead the whole nation, through the paths of repentance and submission to the Divine Will, back to the perfect enjoyment of Union and fraternal peace.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this fifteenth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-eighth.

  • Proclamation of Thanksgiving, October 3, 1863. Also here and here, with commentary. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 6, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 496-497.

    By the President of the United States of America.
    A Proclamation.
    The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequalled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who,while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.
    In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the Eighty-eighth. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). To the friends of Union & Liberty. May 9, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 7, edited by Roy P. Basler. Also here.
    Enough is known of Army operations within the last five days to claim our especial gratitude to God; while what remains undone demands our most sincere prayers to, and reliance upon, Him, without whom, all human effort is vain. I recommend that all patriots, at their homes, in their places of public worship, and wherever they may be, unite in common thanksgiving and prayer to Almighty God. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). Proclamation of Thanksgiving and Prayer, September 3, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 7, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 533-534. Also here.
    The signal success that Divine Providence has recently vouchsafed to the operations of the United States fleet and army in the harbor of Mobile and the reduction of Fort-Powell, Fort-Gaines, and Fort-Morgan, and the glorious achievements of the Army under Major General Sherman in the State of Georgia, resulting in the capture of the City of Atlanta, call for devout acknowledgement to the Supreme Being in whose hands are the destinies of nations. It is therefore requested that on next Sunday, in all places of public worship in the United-States, thanksgiving be offered to Him for His mercy in preserving our national existence against the insurgent rebels who so long have been waging a cruel war against the Government of the United-States, for its overthrow; and also that prayer be made for the Divine protection to our brave soldiers and their leaders in the field, who have so ofen and so gallantly perilled their lives in battling with the enemy; and for blessing and comfort from the Father of Mercies to the sick, wounded, and prisoners, and to the orphans and widows of those who have fallen in the service of their country, and that he will continue to uphold the Government of the United-States against all the efforts of public enemies and secret foes. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

  • Proclamation of Thanksgiving and Prayer, September 3, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 7, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 533-534. Also here.
    The signal success that Divine Providence has recently vouchsafed to the operations of the United States fleet and army in the harbor of Mobile and the reduction of Fort-Powell, Fort-Gaines, and Fort-Morgan, and the glorious achievements of the Army under Major General Sherman in the State of Georgia, resulting in the capture of the City of Atlanta, call for devout acknowledgement to the Supreme Being in whose hands are the destinies of nations. It is therefore requested that on next Sunday, in all places of public worship in the United-States, thanksgiving be offered to Him for His mercy in preserving our national existence against the insurgent rebels who so long have been waging a cruel war against the Government of the United-States, for its overthrow; and also that prayer be made for the Divine protection to our brave soldiers and their leaders in the field, who have so ofen and so gallantly perilled their lives in battling with the enemy; and for blessing and comfort from the Father of Mercies to the sick, wounded, and prisoners, and to the orphans and widows of those who have fallen in the service of their country, and that he will continue to uphold the Government of the United-States against all the efforts of public enemies and secret foes. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). Proclamation of Thanksgiving, October 20, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 8, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 55-56.

    By the President of the United States of America:
    A Proclamation.
    It has pleased Almighty God to prolong our national life another year, defending us with his guardian care against unfriendly designs from abroad, and vouchsafing to us in His mercy many and signal victories over the enemy, who is of our own household. It has also pleased our Heavenly Father to favor as well our citizens in their homes as our soldiers in their camps and our sailors on the rivers and seas with unusual health. He has largely augmented our free population by emancipation and by immigration, while he has opened to us new sources of wealth, and has crowned the labor of our working men in every department of industry with abundant rewards. Moreover, He has been pleased to animate and inspire our minds and hearts with fortitude, courage and resolution sufficient for the great trial of civil war into which we have been brought by our adherence as a nation to the cause of Freedom and Humanity, and to afford to us reasonable hopes of an ultimate and happy deliverance from all our dangers and afflictions.
    Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do, hereby, appoint and set apart the last Thursday in November next as a day, which I desire to be observed by all my fellow-citizens wherever they may then be as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to Almighty God the beneficent Creator and Ruler of the Universe. And I do farther recommend to my fellow-citizens aforesaid that on that occasion they do reverently humble themselves in the dust and from thence offer up penitent and fervent prayers and supplications to the Great Disposer of events for a return of the inestimable blessings of Peace, Union and Harmony throughout the land, which it has pleased him to assign as a dwelling place for ourselves and for our posterity throughout all generations.
    In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington this twentieth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty four, and, of the Independence of the United States the eighty-ninth. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Lincoln). Last Public Address, April 11, 1865. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 8, edited by Roy P. Basler, pp. 399-400.

    We meet this evening, not in sorrow, but in gladness of heart. The evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond, and the surrender of the principal insurgent army, give hope of a righteous and speedy peace whose joyous expression can not be restrained. In the midst of this, however, He, from Whom all blessings flow, must not be forgotten. A call for a national thanksgiving is being prepared, and will be duly promulgated.

  • United States. President (1865-1869: Johnson, Andrew). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation. October 28, 1865.
    Whereas it has pleased Almighty God during the year which is now coming to an end to relieve our beloved country from the fearful scourge of civil war and to permit us to secure the blessings of peace, unity, and harmony, with a great enlargement of civil liberty; and Whereas our Heavenly Father has also during the year graciously averted from us the calamities of foreign war, pestilence, and famine, while our granaries are full of the fruits of an abundant season; and Whereas righteousness exalteth a nation, while sin is a reproach to any people : Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby recommend to the people thereof that they do set apart and observe the first Thursday of December next as a day of national thanksgiving to the Creator of the Universe for these great deliverances and blessings.
    And I do further recommend that on that occasion the whole people make confession of our national sins against His infinite goodness, and with one heart and one mind implore the divine guidance in the ways of national virtue and holiness.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 28th day of October, A.D. 1865, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninetieth.

  • United States. President (1865-1869: Johnson, Andrew). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 8, 1866.
    Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, has been pleased to vouchsafe to us as a people another year of that national life which is an indispensable condition of peace, security and progress. That year has, moreover, been crowned with many peculiar blessings.
    The civil war that so recently closed among us has not been anywhere reopened; foreign intervention has ceased to excite alarm or apprehension; intrusive pestilence has been benignly mitigated; domestic tranquillity has improved, sentiments of conciliation has largely prevailed, and affections of loyalty and patriotism have been widely renewed; our fields have yielded quite abundantly, our mining industry has been richly rewarded, and we have been allowed to extend our railroad system far into the interior recesses of the country, while our commerce has resumed its customary activity in foreign seas.
    These great national blessings demand a national acknowledgment.
    Now, therefore, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby recommend that Thursday, the 29th day of November next, be set apart and be observed everywhere in the several States and Territories of the United States by the people thereof as a day of thanksgiving and praise to Almighty God, with due remembrance that "in His temple doth every man speak of His honor." I recommend also that on the same solemn occasion they do humbly and devoutly implore Him to grant to our national council \s and to our whole people that divine wisdom which alone can lead any nation into the ways of all good.
    In offering these national thanksgivings, praises, and supplications we have the divine assurance that "the Lord remaineth a king forever; them that are meek shall He guide in judgment and such as are gentle shall He learn His way; the Lord shall give strength to His people, and the Lord shall give to His people the blessing of peace." In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 8th day of October, A.D. 1866, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-first.

  • United States. President (1865-1869: Johnson, Andrew). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 26, 1867.
    In conformity with a recent custom that may now be regarded as established on national consent and approval, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby recommend to my fellow citizens that Thursday, the 28th day of November net, be set apart and observed throughout the Republic as a day of national thanksgiving and praise to the Almighty Ruler off Nations, with whom are dominion and fear, who maketh peace in His high places.
    Resting and refraining from secular labors on that day, let us reverently and devoutly give thanks to our Heavenly Father for the mercies and blessings with which He has crowned the now closing year. Especially let us remember that He has covered our land through all its extent with greatly needed and very abundant harvests; that He has caused industry to prosper, not only in our fields, but also in our workshops, in our mines, and in our forests. He has permitted us to multiply ships upon our lakes and rivers and upon the high seas, and at the same time to extend our iron roads to far into the secluded places of the continent as to guarantee speedy overland intercourse between the two oceans. He has inclined our hearts to turn away from domestic contentions and commotions consequent upon a distracting and desolating civil war, and to walk more and more in the ancient ways of loyalty, conciliation, and brotherly love. He has blessed the peaceful efforts with which we have established new and important commercial treaties with foreign nations, while we have at the same time strengthened our national defenses and greatly enlarged our national borders.
    While thus rendering the unanimous and heartfelt tribute of national praise and thanksgiving which is so justly due to Almighty God, let us not fail to implore Him that the same divine protection and care which we have hitherto so undeservedly and yet so constantly enjoyed may be continued to our country and our people throughout all their generations forever.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 26th day of October, A.D. 1867, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-second.

  • United States. President (1865-1869: Johnson, Andrew). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 12, 1868.
    In the year which is now drawing to its end the art, the skill, and the labor of the people of the United States have been employed with greater diligence and vigor and on broader fields than ever before, and the fruits of the earth have been gathered into the granary and the storehouse in marvelous abundance. Our highways have been lengthened, and new and prolific regions have been occupied. We are permitted to hope that long-protracted political and sectional dissensions are at no distant day to give place to returning harmony and fraternal affection throughout the Republic. Many foreign states have entered into liberal agreements with us, while nations which are far off and which heretofore have been unsocial and exclusive have become our friends.
    The annual period of rest, which we have reached in health and tranquillity, and which is crowned with so many blessings, is by universal consent a convenient and suitable one for cultivating personal piety and practicing public devotion.
    I therefore recommend that Thursday, the 26th day of November next, be set apart and observed by all the people of the United States as a day for public praise, thanksgiving, and prayer to the almighty Creator and Divine Ruler of the Universe, by whose everwatchful, merciful, and gracious providence alone states and nations, no less than families and individual men, do live and move and have their being.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 12th day of October, A.D. 1868, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-third.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 5, 1869.
    The year which is drawing to a close has been free from pestilence; health has prevailed throughout the land; abundant crops reward the labors of the husbandman; commerce and manufactures have successfully prosecuted their peaceful paths; the mines and forests have yielded liberally; the nation has increased in wealth and in strength; peace has prevailed, and its blessings have advanced every interest of the people in every part of the Union; harmony and fraternal intercourse restored are obliterating the marks of past conflict and estrangement; burdens have been lightened; means have been increased; civil and religious liberty are secured to every inhabitant of the land, whose soil is trod by none but freemen.
    It becomes a people thus favored to make acknowledgment to the Supreme Author from whom such blessings flow of their gratitude and their dependence, to render praise and thanksgiving for the same, and devoutly to implore a continuance of God's mercies.
    Therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, do recommend that Thursday, the 18th day of November next, be observed as a day of thanksgiving and of praise and of prayer to almighty God, the creator and the ruler of the universe; and I do further recommend to all the people of the United States to assemble on that day in their accustomed places of public worship and to unite in the homage and praise due to the bountiful Father of All Mercies and in fervent prayer for the continuance of the manifold blessings he has vouchsafed to us as a people.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 5th day of October, A.D. 1869, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-fourth.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation.
    Whereas it behooves a people sensible of their dependence on the Almighty publicly and collectively to acknowledge their gratitude for his favors and mercies and humbly to beseech for their continuance; and Whereas the people of the United States during the year now about to end have special cause to be thankful for general prosperity, abundant harvests, exemption from pestilence, foreign war, and civil strife: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, concurring in any similar recommendations from chief magistrates of States, do hereby recommend to all citizens to meet in their respective places of worship on Thursday the 24th day of November next, there to give thanks for the bounty of God during the year about to close and to supplicate for its continuance hereafter.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 21st day of October, A.D. 1870, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-fifth.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 28, 1871.
    The process of the seasons has again enabled the husbandman to garner the fruits of successful toil. Industry has been generally well rewarded. We are at peace with all nations, and tranquillity, with few exceptions, prevails at home. Within the past year we have in the main been free from ills which elsewhere have afflicted our kind. If some of us have had calamities, these should be an occasion for sympathy with the sufferers, of resignation on their part to the will of the Most High, and of rejoicing to the many who have been more favored.
    I therefore recommend that on Thursday, the 30th day of November next, the people meet in their respective places of worship and there make the usual annual acknowledgments to Almighty God for the blessings He has conferred upon them, for their merciful exemption from evils, and invoke His protection and kindness for their less fortunate brethren, whom in His wisdom He has deemed it best to chastise.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 28th day of October, A.D. 1871, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-sixth.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 11, 1872.
    Whereas the revolution of another year has again brought the time when it is usual to look back upon the past and publicly to thank the Almighty for His mercies and His blessings; and
    Whereas if any one people has more occasion than another for such thankfulness it is the citizens of the United States, whose Government is their creature, subject to their behests; who have reserved to themselves ample civil and religious freedom and equality before the law; who during the last twelvemonth have enjoyed exemption from any grievous or general calamity, and to whom prosperity in agriculture, manufactures, and commerce has been vouchsafed;
    Now, therefore, by these considerations, I recommend that on Thursday, the 28th day of November next, the people meet in their respective places of worship and there make their acknowledgments to God for His kindness and bounty.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 11th day of October, A.D. 1872, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-seventh.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 14, 1873.
    The approaching close of another year brings with it the occasion for renewed thanksgiving and acknowledgment to the Almighty Ruler of the Universe for the unnumbered mercies which He has bestowed upon us.
    Abundant harvests have been among the rewards of industry. With local exceptions, health has been among the many blessings enjoyed. Tranquillity at home and peace with other nations have prevailed.
    Frugal industry is regaining its merited recognition and its merited rewards.
    Gradually but, under the providence of God, surely, as we trust, the nation is recovering from the lingering results of a dreadful civil strife.
    For these and all the other mercies vouchsafed it becomes us as a people to return heartfelt and grateful acknowledgments, and with our thanksgiving for blessings we may unite prayers for the cessation of local and temporary sufferings.
    I therefore recommend that on Thursday, the 27th day of November next, the people meet in their respective places of worship to make their acknowledgments to Almighty God for His bounties and His protection, and to offer to Him prayers for their continuance.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 14th day of October, A.D. 1873, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-eighth.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 27, 1874.
    We are reminded by the changing seasons that it is time to pause in our daily avocations and offer thanks to Almighty God for the mercies and abundance of the year which is drawing to a close.
    The blessings of free government continue to be vouchsafed to us; the earth has responded to the labor of the husbandman; the land has been free from pestilence; internal order is being maintained, and peace with other powers has prevailed.
    It is fitting that at stated periods we should cease from our accustomed pursuits and from the turmoil of our daily lives and unite in thankfulness for the blessings of the past and in the cultivation of kindly feelings toward each other.
    Now, therefore, recognizing these considerations, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, do recommend to all citizens to assemble in their respective places of worship on Thursday, the 26th day of November next, and express their thanks for the mercy and favor of Almighty God, and, laying aside all political contentions and all secular occupations, to observe such day as a day of rest, thanksgiving, and praise.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 27th day of October, A.D. 1874, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-ninth.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 27, 1875.
    In accordance with a practice at once wise and beautiful, we have been accustomed, as the year is drawing to a close, to devote an occasion to the humble expression of our thanks to Almighty God for the ceaseless and distinguished benefits bestowed upon us as a nation and for His mercies and protection during the closing year.
    Amid the rich and free enjoyment of all our advantages, we should not forget the source from whence they are derived and the extent of our obligation to the Father of All Mercies.
    We have full reason to renew our thanks to Almighty God for favors bestowed upon us during the past year.
    By His continuing mercy civil and religious liberty have been maintained, peace has reigned within our borders, labor and enterprise have produced their merited rewards; and to His watchful providence we are indebted for security from pestilence and other national calamity.
    Apart from national blessings, each individual among us has occasion to thoughtfully recall and devoutly recognize the favors and protection which he has enjoyed.
    Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, do recommend that on Thursday, the 25th day of November, the people of the United States, abstaining from all secular pursuits and from their accustomed avocations, do assemble in their respective places of worship, and, in such form as may seem most appropriate in their own hearts, offer to Almighty God their acknowledgments and thanks for all His mercies and their humble prayers for a continuance of His divine favor.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 27th day of October, A.D. 1875, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundredth.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation. June 26, 1876.
    The centennial anniversary of the day on which the people of the United States declared their right to a separate and equal station among the powers of the earth seems to demand an exceptional observance.
    The founders of the Government, at its birth and in its feebleness, invoked the blessings and the protection of a Divine Providence, and the thirteen colonies and three millions of people have expanded into a nation of strength and numbers commanding the position which then was asserted and for which fervent prayers were then offered.
    It seems fitting that on the occurrence of the hundredth anniversary of our existence as a nation a grateful acknowledgment should be made to Almighty God for the protection and the bounties which He has vouchsafed to our beloved country.
    I therefore invite the good people of the United States, on the approaching 4th day of July, in addition to the usual observances with which they are accustomed to greet the return of the day, further, in such manner and at such time as in their respective localities and religious associations may be most convenient, to mark its recurrence by some public religious and devout thanksgiving to Almighty God for the blessings which have been bestowed upon us as a nation during the century of our existence, and humbly to invoke a continuance of His favor and of His protection.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 26th day of June, A. D. 1876, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundredth.
    U. S. GRANT.
    By the President: HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State.

  • United States. President (1869-1877: Grant). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 26, 1876.
    From year to year we have been accustomed to pause in our daily pursuits and set apart a time to offer our thanks to Almighty God for the special blessings He has vouchsafed to us, with our prayers for a continuance thereof.
    We have at this time equal reason to be thankful for His continued protection and for the many material blessings which His bounty has bestowed.
    In addition to these favors accorded to us as individuals, we have especial occasion to express our hearty thanks to Almighty God that by His providence and guidance our Government, established a century ago, has been enabled to fulfill the purpose of its founders in offering an asylum to the people of every race, securing civil and religious liberty to all within its borders, and meting out to every individual alike justice and equality before the law.
    It is, moreover, especially our duty to offer our humble prayers to the Father of All Mercies for a continuance of His divine favor to us as a nation and as individuals.
    By reason of all these considerations, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States, do recommend to the people of the United States to devote the 30th day of November next to the expression of their thanks and prayers to Almighty God, and, laying aside their daily avocations and all secular occupations, to assemble in their respective places of worship and observe such day as a day of thanksgiving and rest.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 26th day of October, A.D. 1876, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and first.

  • United States. President (1877-1881: Hayes). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 29, 1877.
    The completed circle of summer and winter, seedtime and harvest, has brought us to the accustomed season at which a religious people celebrates with praise and thanksgiving the enduring mercy of Almighty God. This devout and public confession of the constant dependence of man upon the divine favor for all the goodgifts of life and health and peace and happiness, so early in our history made the habit of our people, finds in the survey of the past year new grounds for its joyful and grateful manifestation.
    In all the blessings which depend upon benignant seasons, this has indeed been a memorable year. Over the wide territory of our country, with all its diversity of soil and climate and products, the earth has yielded a bountiful return to the labor of the husbandman. The health of the people has been blighted by no prevalent or widespread diseases. No great disasters of shipwreck upon our coasts or to our commerce on the seas have brought loss and hardship to merchants or mariners and clouded the happiness of the community with sympathetic sorrow.
    In all that concerns our strength and peace and greatness as a nation; in all that touches the permanence and security of our Government and the beneficent institutions on which it rests; in all that affects the character and dispositions of our people and tests our capacity to enjoy and uphold the equal and free condition of society, now permanent and universal throughout the land, the experience of the last year is conspicuously marked by the protecting providence of God and is full of promise and hope for the coming generations.
    Under a sense of these infinite obligations to the Great Ruler of Times and Seasons and Events, let us humbly ascribe it to our own faults and frailties if in any degree that perfect concord and happiness, peace and justice, which such great mercies should diffuse through the hearts and lives of our people do not altogether and always and everywhere prevail. Let us with one spirit and with one voice lift up praise and thanksgiving to God for His manifold goodness to our land, His manifest care for our nation.
    Now, therefore, I, Rutherford B. Hayes, President of the United States, do appoint Thursday, the 29th day of November next, as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer; and I earnestly recommend that, withdrawing themselves from secular cares and labors, the people of the United States do meet together on that day in their respective places of worship, there to give thanks and praise to Almighty God for His mercies and to devoutly beseech their continuance.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 29th day of October, A.D. 1877, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and second.

  • United States. President (1877-1881: Hayes). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation. October 30, 1878.
    The recurrence of that season at which it is the habit of our people to make devout and public confession of their constant dependence upon the divine favor for all the good gifts of life and happiness and of public peace and prosperity exhibits in the record of the year abundant reasons for our gratitude and thanksgiving.
    Exuberant harvests, productive mines, ample crops of the staples of trade and manufactures, have enriched the country.
    The resources thus furnished to our reviving industry and expanding commerce are hastening the day when discords and distresses through the length and breadth of the land will, under the continued favor of Providence, have given way to confidence and energy and assured prosperity.
    Peace with all nations has been maintained unbroken, domestic tranquillity has prevailed, and the institutions of liberty and justice which the wisdom and virtue of our fathers established remain the glory and defense of their children.
    The general prevalence of the blessings of health through our wide land has made more conspicuous the sufferings and sorrows which the dark shadow of pestilence has cast upon a portion of our people. This heavy affliction even the Divine Ruler has tempered to the suffering communities in the universal sympathy and succor which have flowed to their relief, and the whole nation may rejoice in the unity of spirit in our people by which they cheerfully share one another's burdens.
    Now, therefore, I, Rutherford B. Hayes, President of the United States, do appoint Thursday, the 28th day of November next, as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer; and I earnestly recommend that, withdrawing themselves from secular cares and labors, the people of the United States do meet together on that day in their respective places of worship, there to give thanks and praise to Almighty God for His mercies and to devoutly beseech their continuance.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 30th day of October, A.D. 1878, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and third.
    R.B. HAYES
    By the President:
    WM. M. EVARTS, Secretary of State.

  • United States. President (1877-1881: Hayes). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 3, 1879.
    At no recurrence of the season which the devout habit of a religious people has made the occasion for giving thanks to Almighty God and humbly invoking His continued favor has the material prosperity enjoyed by our whole country been more conspicuous, more manifold, or more universal.
    During the past year, also, unbroken peace with all foreign nations, the general prevalence of domestic tranquillity, the supremacy and security of the great institutions of civil and religious freedom, have gladdened the hearts of our people and confirmed their attachment to their Government, which the wisdom and courage of their descendants have so firmly maintained to be the habitation of liberty and justice to successive generations.
    Now, therefore, I, Rutherford B. Hayes, President of the United States, do appoint Thursday, the 27th day of November instant, as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer; and I earnestly recommend that, withdrawing themselves from secular cares and labors the people of the United States do meet together on that day in their respective places of worship, there to give thanks and praise to Almighty God for His mercies and to devoutly beseech their continuance.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 3d day of November, A.D. 1879, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fourth.

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Hayes). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1880.
    At no period in their history since the United States became a nation has this people had so abundant and so universal reasons for joy and gratitude at the favor of Almighty God or been subject to so profound an obligation to give thanks for His loving kindness and humbly to implore His continued care and protection.
    Health, wealth, and prosperity throughout all our borders; peace, honor, and friendship with all the world; firm and faithful adherence by the great body of our population to the principles of liberty and justice which have made our greatness as a nation, and to the wise institutions and strong frame of government and society, which will perpetuate it - for all these let the thanks of a happy and united people, as with one voice, ascend in devout homage to the Giver of All Good.
    I therefore recommend that on Thursday, the 25th day of November next, the people meet in their respective places of worship to make their acknowledgments to Almighty God for His bounties and His protection and to offer to Him prayers for their continuance.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 1st day of November, A.D. 1880, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fifth.

  • United States. President (1881-1885: Arthur). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 4, 1881.
    It has long been the pious custom of our people, with the closing of the year, to look back upon the blessings brought to them in the changing course of the seasons and to return solemn thanks to the all-giving source from whom they flow. And although at this period, when the falling leaf admonishes us that the time of our sacred duty is at hand, our nation still lies in the shadow of a great bereavement, and the mourning which has filled our hearts still finds its sorrowful expression toward the God before whom we but lately bowed in grief and supplication, yet the countless benefits which have showered upon us during the past twelvemonth call for our fervent gratitude and make it fitting that we should rejoice with thankfulness that the Lord in His infinite mercy has most signally favored our country and our people. Peace without and prosperity within have been vouchsafed to us, no pestilence has visited our shores, the abundant privileges of freedom which our fathers left us in their wisdom are still our increasing heritage; and if in parts of our vast domain sore affliction has visited our brethren in their forest homes, yet even this calamity has been tempered and in a manner sanctified by the generous compassion for the sufferers which has been called forth throughout our land. For all these things it is meet that the voice of the nation should go up to God in devout homage.
    Wherefore, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States, do recommend that all the people observe Thursday, the 24th day of November instant, as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer, by ceasing, so far as may be, from their secular labors and meeting in their several places of worship, there to join in ascribing honor and praise to Almighty God, whose goodness has been so manifest in our history and in our lives, and offering earnest prayers that His bounties may continue to us and to our children.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 4th day of November, A.D. 1881, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixth.

  • United States. President (1881-1885: Arthur). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 25, 1882.
    In conformity with a custom the annual observance of which is justly held in honor by this people, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States, do hereby set apart Thursday, the 30th day of November next, as a day of public thanksgiving.
    The blessings demanding our gratitude are numerous and varied. For the peace and amity which subsist between this Republic and all the nations of the world; for the freedom from internal discord and violence; for the increasing friendship between the different sections of the land; for liberty, justice, and constitutional government; for the devotion of the people to our free institutions and their cheerful obedience to mild laws; for the constantly increasing strength of the Republic while extending its privileges to fellow-men who come to us; for the improved means of internal communication and the increased facilities of intercourse with other nations; for the general prevailing health of the year; for the prosperity for all our industries, the liberal return for the mechanic's toil affording a market for the abundant harvests of the husbandman; for the preservation of the national faith and credit; for wise and generous provision to effect the intellectual and moral education of our youth; for the influence upon the conscience of a restraining and transforming religion, and for the joys of home - for these and for many other blessings we should give thanks.
    Wherefore I do recommend that the day above designated be observed throughout the country as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer, and that the people, ceasing from their daily labors and meeting in accordance with their several forms of worship, draw near to the throne of Almighty God, offering to Him praise and gratitude for the manifold goodness which He has vouchsafed to us and praying that His blessings and His mercies may continue.
    And I do further recommend that the day thus appointed be made a special occasion for deeds of kindness and charity to the suffering and the needy, so that all who dwell within the land may rejoice and be glad in this season of national thanksgiving.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 25th day of October, A.D. 1882, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventh.

  • United States. President (1881-1885: Arthur). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 26, 1883.
    In furtherance of the custom of this people at the closing of each year to engage, upon a day set apart for that purpose, in a special festival of praise to the Giver of All Good, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States, do hereby designate Thursday, the 29th day of November next, as a day of national thanksgiving.
    The year which is drawing to an end has been replete with evidences of divine goodness.
    The prevalence of health, the fullness of the harvests, the stability of peace and order, the growth of fraternal feeling, the spread of intelligence and learning, the continued enjoyment of civil and religious liberty - all these and countless other blessings are cause for reverent rejoicing.
    I do therefore recommend that on the day above appointed the people rest from their accustomed labors and, meeting in their several places of worship, express their devout gratitude to God that He hath dealt so bountifully with this nation and pray that His grace and favor abide with it forever.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 26th day of October, A.D. 1883, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighth.

  • United States. President (1881-1885: Arthur). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 7, 1884.
    The season is nigh when it is the yearly wont of this people to observe a day appointed for that purpose by the President as an especial occasion for thanksgiving unto God.
    Now, therefore, in recognition of this hallowed custom, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States, do hereby designate as such day of general thanksgiving Thursday, the 27th day of this present November.
    And I do recommend that throughout the land the people, ceasing from their accustomed occupations, do then keep holiday at their several homes and their several places of worship, and with heart and voice pay reverent acknowledgment to the giver of All Good for the countless blessings wherewith He hath visited this nation.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 7th day of November, A.D. 1884, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninth.

  • United States. President (1885-1889: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 2, 1885.
    The American people have always abundant cause to be thankful to Almighty God, whose watchful care and guiding hand have been manifested in every stage of their national life, guarding and protecting them in time of peril and safety leading them in the hour of darkness and of danger.
    It is fitting and proper that a nation thus favored should on one day in every year, for that purpose especially appointed, publicly acknowledge the goodness of God and return thanks to Him for all His gracious gifts.
    Therefore, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the 26th day of November instant, as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, and do invoke the observance of the same by all the people of the land.
    On that day let all secular business be suspended, and let the people assemble in their usual places of worship and with prayer and songs of praise devoutly testify their gratitude to the Giver of Every Good and Perfect Gift for all that He has done for us in the year that has passed; for our preservation as a united nation and for our deliverance from the shock and danger of political convulsion; for the blessings of peace and for our safety and quiet while wars and rumors of war have agitated and afflicted other nations of the earth; for our security against the scourge of pestilence, which in other lands has claimed its dead by thousands and filled the streets with mourners; for plenteous crops which reward the labor of the husbandman and increase our nation's wealth, and for the contentment throughout our borders which follows in the train of prosperity and abundance.
    And let there also be on the day thus set apart a reunion of families, sanctified and chastened by tender memories and associations; and let the social intercourse of friends, with pleasant reminiscence, renew the ties of affection and strengthen the bonds of kindly feeling.
    And let us by no means forget while we give thanks and enjoy the comforts which have crowned our lives that truly grateful hearts are inclined to deeds of charity, and that a kind and thoughtful remembrance of the poor will double the pleasures of our condition and render our praise and thanksgiving more acceptable in the sight of the Lord.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 2d day of November, A.D. 1885, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and tenth.

  • United States. President (1885-1889: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1886.
    It has long been the custom of the people of the United States, on a day in each year especially set apart for that purpose by their Chief Executive, to acknowledge the goodness and mercy of God and to invoke His continued care and protection.
    In observance of such custom I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the 25th of November, instant, to be observed and kept as a day of thanksgiving and prayer.
    On that day let all our people forego their accustomed employments and assemble in their usual places of worship to give thanks to the Ruler of the Universe for our continued enjoyment of the blessings of a free government, for a renewal of business prosperity throughout our land, for the return which has rewarded the labor of those who till the soil, and for our progress as a people in all that makes a nation great.
    And while we contemplate the infinite power of God in earthquake, flood, and storm let the grateful hearts of those who have been shielded from harm through His mercy be turned in sympathy and kindness toward those who have suffered through His visitations.
    Let us also in the midst of our thanksgiving remember the poor and needy with cheerful gifts and alms so that our service may by deeds of charity be made acceptable in the sight of the Lord.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 1st day of November, A.D. 1886, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eleventh.

  • United States. President (1885-1889: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 25, 1887.
    The goodness and the mercy of God, which have followed the American people during all the days of the past year, claim their grateful recognition and humble acknowledgment. By His omnipotent power He has protected us from war and pestilence and from every national calamity; by His gracious favor the earth has yielded a generous return to the labor of the husbandman, and every path of honest toil has led to comfort and contentment; by His loving kindness the hearts of our people have been replenished with fraternal sentiment and patriotic endeavor, and by His unerring guidance we have been directed in the way of national prosperity.
    To the end that we may with one accord testify our gratitude for all these blessings, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the 24th day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by all the people of the land.
    On that day let all secular work and employment be suspended, and let our people assemble in their accustomed places of worship and with prayer and songs of praise give thanks to our Heavenly Father for all that He has done for us, while we humbly implore the forgiveness of our sins and a continuance of His mercy.
    Let families and kindred be united on that day, and let their hearts, filled with kindly cheer and affectionate reminiscence, be turned in thankfulness to the source of all their pleasures and the giver of all that makes the day glad and joyous.
    And in the midst of our worship and our happiness let us remember the poor, the needy, and the unfortunate, and by our gifts of charity and ready benevolence let us increase the number of those who with grateful hearts shall join in our thanksgiving.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 25th day of October, A.D. 1887, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and twelfth.

  • United States. President (1885-1889: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1888.
    Constant thanksgiving and gratitude are due from the American people to Almighty God for His goodness and mercy, which have followed them since the day He made them a nation and vouchsafed to them a free government. With loving kindness He has constantly led us in the way of prosperity and greatness. He has not visited with swift punishment our shortcomings, but with gracious care He has warned us of our dependence upon His forbearance and has taught us that obedience to His holy law is the price of a continuance of His precious gifts.
    In acknowledgment of all that God has done for us as a nation, and to the end that on an appointed day the united prayers and praise of a grateful country may reach the throne of grace, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the 29th day of November instant, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, to be kept and observed throughout the land.
    On that day let all our people suspend their ordinary work and occupations, and in their accustomed places of worship, with prayer and songs of praise, render thanks to God for all His mercies, for the abundant harvests which have rewarded the toil of the husbandman during the year that has passed, and for the rich rewards that have followed the labors of our people in their shops and their marts of trade and traffic. Let us give thanks for peace and for social order and contentment within our borders, and for our advancement in all that adds to national greatness.
    And mindful of the afflictive dispensation with which a portion of our land has been visited, let us, while we humble ourselves before the power of God, acknowledge His mercy in setting bounds to the deadly march of pestilence, and let our hearts be chastened by sympathy with our fellow-countrymen who have suffered and who mourn.
    And as we return thanks for all the blessings which we have received from the hands of our Heavenly Father, let us not forget that He has enjoined upon us charity; and on this day of thanksgiving let us generously remember the poor and needy, so that our tribute of praise and gratitude may be acceptable in the sight of the Lord.
    Done at the city of Washington on the 1st day of November, 1888, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and thirteenth.
    GROVER CLEVELAND

  • United States. President (1889-1893: Harrison, Benjamin). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, April 4, 1889. Centennial of Washington's Inauguation.
    A hundred years have passed since the Government which our fore-fathers founded was formally organized. At noon on the 30th day of April, 1789, in the city of New York, and in the presence of an assemblage of the heroic men whose patriotic devotion had led the colonies to victory and independence, George Washington took the oath of office as Chief Magistrate of the new-born Republic. This impressive act was preceded at 9 o'clock in the morning in all the churches of the city by prayer for God's blessing on the Government and its first President.
    The centennial of this illustrious event in our history has been declared a general holiday by act of Congress, to the end that the people of the whole country may join in commemorative exercises appropriate to the day.
    In order that the joy of the occasion may be associated with a deep thankfulness in the minds of the people for all our blessings in the past and a devout supplication to God for their gracious continuance in the future, the representatives of the religious creeds, both Christian and Hebrew, have memorialized the Government to designate an hour for prayer and thanksgiving on that day.
    Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, in response to this pious and reasonable request, do recommend that on Tuesday, April 30, at the hour of 9 o'clock in the morning, the people of the entire country repair to their respective places of divine worship to implore the favor of God that the blessings of liberty, prosperity, and peace may abide with us as a people, and that His hand may lead us in the paths of righteousness and good deeds.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.
    Done in the city of Washington, this 4th day of April, A. D. 1889, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and thirteenth.
    BENJ. HARRISON
    By the President:
    JAMES G. BLAINE,
    Secretary of State.

  • United States. President (1889-1893: Harrison, Benjamin). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1889.
    A highly favored people, mindful of their dependence on the bounty of Divine Providence, should seek fitting occasion to testify gratitude and ascribe praise to Him who is the author of their many blessings. It behooves us, then, to look back with thankful hearts over the past year and bless God for His infinite mercy in vouchsafing to our land enduring peace, to our people freedom from pestilence and famine, to our husbandmen abundant harvests, and to them that labor a recompense of their toil.
    Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, do earnestly recommend that Thursday, the 28th day of this present month of November, be set apart as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer, and that the people of our country, ceasing from the cares and labors of their working day, shall assemble in their respective places of worship and give thanks to God, who has prospered us on our way and made our paths the paths of peace, beseeching Him to bless the day to our present and future good, making it truly one of thanksgiving for each reunited home circle as for the nation at large.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 1st day of November, A.D. 1889, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fourteenth.
    BENJAMIN HARRISON

  • United States. President (1861-1865: Harrison). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 8, 1890.
    By the grace and favor of Almighty God the people of this nation have been led to the closing days of the passing year, which has been full of the blessings of peace and the comforts of plenty. Bountiful compensation has come to us for the work of our minds and of our hands in every department of human industry.
    Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, do hereby appoint Thursday, the 27th day of the present month of November, to be observed as a day of prayer and thanksgiving; and I do invite the people upon that day to cease from their labors, to meet in their accustomed houses of worship, and to join in rendering gratitude and praise to our beneficent Creator for the rich blessings He has granted to us as a nation and in invoking the continuance of His protection and grace for the future. I commend to my fellow-citizens the privilege of remembering the poor, the homeless, and the sorrowful. Let us endeavor to merit the promised recompense of charity and the gracious acceptance of our praise.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 8th day of November, A.D. 1890, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fifteenth.

  • United States. President (1889-1893: Harrison, Benjamin). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 13, 1891.
    It is a very glad incident of the marvelous prosperity which has crowned the year now drawing to a close that its helpful and reassuring touch has been felt by all our people. It has been as wide as our country, and so special that every home has felt its comforting influence. It is too great to be the work of man's power and too particular to be the device of his mind. To God, the beneficent and the all-wise, who makes the labors of men to be fruitful, redeems their losses by His grace, and the measure of whose giving is as much beyond the thoughts of man as it is beyond his deserts, the praise and gratitude of the people of this favored nation are justly due.
    Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, do hereby appoint Thursday, the 26th day of November present, to be a day of joyful thanksgiving to God for the bounties of His providence, for the peace in which we are permitted to enjoy them, and for the preservation of those institutions of civil and religious liberty which He gave our fathers the wisdom to devise and establish and us the courage to preserve. Among the appropriate observances of the day are rest from toil, worship in the public congregation, the renewal of family ties about our American firesides, and thoughtful helpfulness toward those who suffer lack of the body or of the spirit.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of November, A.D. 1891, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixteenth.

  • United States. President (1889-1893: Harrison, Benjamin). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 4, 1892.
    The gifts of God to our people during the past year have been so abundant and so special that the spirit of devout thanksgiving awaits not a call, but only the appointment of a day when it may have a common expression. He has stayed the pestilence at our door; He has given us more love for the free civil institutions in the creation of which His directing providence was so conspicuous; He has awakened a deeper reverence for law; He has widened our philanthropy by a call to succor the distress in other lands; He has blessed our schools and is bringing forward a patriotic and God-fearing generation to execute His great and benevolent designs for our country He has given us great increase in material wealth and a wide diffusion of contentment and comfort in the homes of our people; He has given his grace to the sorrowing.
    Wherefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States, do call upon all our people to observe, as we have been wont, Thursday, the 24th day of this month of November, as a day of thanksgiving to God for His mercies and of supplication for His continued care and grace.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 4th day of November, 1892, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventeenth.

  • United States. President (1893-1897: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 3, 1893.
    While the American people should every day remember with praise and thanksgiving the divine goodness and mercy which have followed them since their beginning as a nation, it is fitting that one day in each year should be especially devoted to the contemplation of the blessings we have received from the hand of God and to the grateful acknowledgment of His loving kindness.
    Therefore, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the 30th day of the present month of November, as a day of thanksgiving and praise to be kept and observed by all the people of our land. On that day let us forego our ordinary work and employments and assemble in our usual places of worship, where we may recall all that God has done for us and where from grateful hearts our united tribute of praise and song may reach the Throne of Grace. Let the reunion of kindred and the social meeting of friends lend cheer and enjoyment to the day, and let generous gifts of charity for the relief of the poor and needy prove the sincerity of our thanksgiving.
    Witness my hand and the seal of the United States, which I have caused to be hereto affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington on the 3d day of November, A.D. 1893, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighteenth.

  • United States. President (1893-1897: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1894.
    The American people should gratefully render thanksgiving and praise to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, who has watched over them with kindness and fostering care during the year that has passed; they should also with humility and faith supplicate the Father of All Mercies for continued blessings according to their needs, and they should be Deeds of charity seek the favor of the Giver of Every Good and Perfect Gift.
    Therefore, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby appoint and set apart Thursday, the 29th day of November instant, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer to be kept and observed by all the people of the land.
    On that day let our ordinary work and business be suspended and let us meet in our accustomed places of worship and give thanks to Almighty God for our preservation as a nation, for our immunity from disease and pestilence, for the harvests that have rewarded our husbandry, for a renewal of national prosperity, and for every advance in virtue and intelligence that has marked our growth as a people.
    And with our thanksgiving let us pray that these blessings may be multiplied unto us, that our national conscience may be quickened to a better recognition of the power and goodness of God, and that in our national life we may clearer see and closer follow the path of righteousness.
    And in our places of worship and praise, as well as in the happy reunions of kindred and friends on that day, let us invoke divine approval by generously remembering the poor and needy. Surely He who have given us comfort and plenty will look upon our relief of the destitute and our ministrations of charity as the work of hearts truly grateful and as proofs of the sincerity of our thanksgiving.
    Witness my hand and the seal of the United States, which I have caused to be hereto affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington on the 1st day of November, A.D. 1894 and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and nineteenth.

  • United States. President (1893-1897: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 4, 1895.
    The constant goodness and forbearance of Almighty God which have been vouchsafed to the American people during the year which is just past call for their sincere acknowledgment and devout gratitude.
    To the end, therefore, that we may with thankful hearts unite in extolling the loving care of our Heavenly Father, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby appoint and set apart Thursday, the 28th day of the present month of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer to be kept and observed by all our people.
    On that day let us forego our usual occupations and in our accustomed places of worship join in rendering thanks to the Giver of Every Good and Perfect Gift for the bounteous returns that have rewarded our labors in the fields and in the busy marts of trade, for the peace and order that have prevailed throughout the land, for our protection from pestilence and dire calamity, and for the other blessings that have been showered upon us from an open hand.
    And with our thanksgiving let us humbly beseech the Lord to so incline the hearts of our people unto Him that He will not leave us nor forsake us as a nation, but will continue to us His mercy and protecting care, guiding us in the path of national prosperity and happiness, enduing us with rectitude and virtue, and keeping alive within us a patriotic love for the free institutions which have been given to us as our national heritage.
    And let us also on the day of our thanksgiving especially remember the poor and needy, and by deeds of charity let us show the sincerity of our gratitude.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 4th day of November, A.D. 1895, and in the one hundred and twentieth year of the Independence of the United States.

  • United States. President (1893-1897: Cleveland). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 4, 1896.
    The people of the United States should never be unmindful of the gratitude they owe the God of Nations for His watchful care, which has shielded them from dire disaster and pointed out to them the way of peace and happiness. Nor should they ever refuse to acknowledge with contrite hearts their proneness to turn away from God's teachings and to follow with sinful pride after their own devices.
    To the end that these thoughts may be quickened it is fitting that on a day especially appointed we should join together in approaching the Throne of Grace with praise and supplication.
    Therefore, I Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the 26th day of the present month of November, to be kept and observed as a day of thanksgiving and prayer throughout our land.
    On that day let all our people forego their usual work and occupation, and, assembled in their accustomed places of worship, let them with one accord render thanks to the Ruler of the Universe for our preservation as a nation and our deliverance from every threatened danger, for the peace that has dwelt within our boundaries, for our defense against disease and pestilence during the year that has passed, for the plenteous rewards that have followed the labors of our husbandmen, and for all the other blessings that have been vouchsafed to us.
    And let us, through the mediation of Him who has taught us how to pray, implore the forgiveness of our sins and a continuation of heavenly favor.
    Let us not forget on this day of thanksgiving the poor and needy, and by deeds of charity let our offerings of praise be made more acceptable in the sight of the Lord.
    Witness my hand and the seal of the United States, which I have caused to be hereto affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 4th day of November, A.D. 1896, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and twenty-first.

  • United States. President (1897-1901: McKinley). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 29, 1897.
    In remembrance of God's goodness to us during the past year, which has been so abundant. "Let us offer Him our thanksgiving and pay our vows unto the Most High." Under His watchful providence, industry has prospered, the conditions of labor have been improved, the rewards of the husbandman have been increased, and the comforts of our homes multiplied. His mighty hand has preserved peace and protected the nation. Respect for law and order has been strengthened, love of free institutions cherished, and all sections of our beloved country brought into closer bonds of fraternal regard and generous cooperation.
    For these great benefits it is our duty to praise the Lord in a spirit of humility and gratitude, and to offer up to Him our most earnest supplications. That we may acknowledge our obligation as a people to Him who has so graciously granted us the blessings of free government and material prosperity, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, do hereby designate and set apart Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November, for national thanksgiving and prayer, which all of the people are invited to observe with appropriate religious services in their respective places of worship.
    On this day of rejoicing and domestic reunion, let our prayers ascend to the Giver of every good and perfect gift, for the continuance of His love and favor to us, that our hearts may be filled with charity and good will, and that we may be ever worthy of His beneficent concern.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington this twenty-ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-second.

  • United States. President (1897-1901: McKinley). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation.
    Executive Mansion, Washington, July 6, 1898 To the People of the United States of America: At this time, when to the yet fresh remembrance of the unprecedented success which attended the operations of the United States fleet in the bay of Manila on the 1st day of May last are added the tiding of the no less glorious achievements of the naval and military arms of our beloved country at Santiago de Cuba, it is fitting that we should pause and, staying the feeling of exultation that too naturally attends great deeds wrought by our countrymen in our country's cause, should reverently bow before the throne of divine grace and give devout praise to god, who holdeth the nations in the hollow of His hands and worketh upon them the marvels of His high will, and who has thus far vouchsafed to us the light of his face and led our brave soldiers and seamen to victory.
    I therefore ask the people of the United States, upon next assembling for divine worship in their respective places of meeting, to offer thanksgiving to Almighty God, who in His inscrutable ways, now leading our hosts upon the waters to unscathed triumph; now guiding them in a strange land, through the dread shadows of death, to success, even though at a fearful cost; now bearing them, without accident or loss, to far distant climes, has watched over our cause and brought nearer the success of the right and the attainment of just and honorable peace.
    With the nation's thanks let there be mingled the nation's prayers that our gallant sons may be shielded from harm alike on the battlefield and in the clash of fleets, and be spared the scourge of suffering and disease while they are striving to uphold their country's honor; and withal let the nation's heart be stilled with holy awe at the thought of the noble men who have perished as heroes die, and be filled with compassionate sympathy for all those who suffer bereavement or endure sickness, wounds, and bonds by reason of the awful struggle. And above all, let us pray with earnest fervor that He, the Dispenser of All good, may speedily remove from us the untold afflictions of war and bring to our dear land the blessings of restored peace and to all the domain now ravaged by the cruel strife the priceless boon of security and tranquility.

  • United States. President (1897-1901: McKinley). Address to the People for Thanksgiving and Prayer. July 9, 1898.

  • United States. President (1897-1901: McKinley). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 28, 1898.
    The approaching November brings to mind the custom of our ancestors, hallowed by time and rooted in our most sacred traditions, of giving thanks to Almighty God for all the blessings He has vouchsafed to us during the year.
    Few years in our history have afforded such cause for thanksgiving as this. We have been blessed by abundant harvests; our trade and commerce have wonderfully increased; our public credit has been improved and strengthened; all sections of our common country have been brought together and knitted into closer bonds of national purpose and unity.
    The skies have been for a time darkened by the cloud of war, but as we were compelled to take up the sword in the cause of humanity we are permitted to rejoice that the conflict has been of brief duration and the losses we have had to mourn, though grievous and important, have been so few, considering the great results accomplished, as to inspire us with gratitude and praise to the Lord of Hosts. We may laud and magnify His holy name that the cessation of hostilities came so soon as to spare both sides the countless sorrows and disasters that attend protracted war.
    I do therefore invite all my fellow-citizens, as well as those who may be at sea or sojourning in foreign lands as those at home, to set apart and observe Thursday, the 24th day of November, as a day of national thanksgiving, to come together in their several places of worship for a service of praise and thanks to almighty God for all the blessings of the year, for the mildness of the seasons and the fruitfulness of the soil, for the continued prosperity of the people, for the devotion and valor of our countrymen, for the glory of our victory and the hope of a righteous peace, and to pray that the divine guidance which has brought us heretofore to safety and honor may be graciously continued in the years to come.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 28th day of October, A.D. 1898, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-third.

  • United States. President (1897-1901: McKinley). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 25, 1899.
    A national custom dear to the heart of the people calls for the setting apart of one day in each year as an occasion of special thanksgiving to Almighty God for the blessings of the preceding year. This honored observance acquires with time a tender significance. It enriches domestic life. It summons under the family roof the absent children to glad reunion with those they love.
    Seldom has this nation had greater cause for profound thanksgiving. No great pestilence has invaded our shores. Liberal employment waits upon labor. Abundant crops have rewarded the efforts of the husbandman. Increased comforts have come to the home. The national finances have been strengthened, and public credit has been sustained and made firmer. In all branches of industry and trade there has been an unequaled degree of prosperity, while there has been a steady gain in the moral and educational growth of our national character. Churches and schools have flourished. American patriotism has been exalted. Those engaged in maintaining the honor of the flag with such signal success have been in a large degree spared from disaster and disease. An honorable peace has been ratified with a foreign nation with which we were at war, and we are now on friendly relations with every Power on earth.
    The trust which we have assumed for the people of Cuba has been faithfully advanced. There has been marked progress toward restoration of healthy industrial conditions, and under wise sanitary regulations the island has enjoyed unusual exemption from the scourge of fever. The hurricane which swept over our new possession of Porto Rico, destroying the homes and property of the inhabitants, called forth the instant sympathy of the people of the United States, who were swift to respond with generous aid to the sufferers. While the insurrection still continues in the island of Luzon, business is resuming its activity, and confidence in the good purpose of the United States is rapidly established throughout the archipelago.
    For these reasons and countless others, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, do hereby name Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next, as a day of general thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed as such by all people on this continent and in our newly acquired islands, as well as by those who may be at sea or sojourning in foreign lands; and I advise that on this day religious exercises shall be conducted in the churches or meeting places of all denominations, in order that in the social features of the day its real significance may not be lost sight of, but prayers may be offered to the Most High for a continuance of the divine guidance without which man?s efforts are vain, and for divine consolation to those whose kindred and friends have sacrificed their lives for country.
    I recommend also that on this day, so far as may be found practicable, labor shall cease from its accustomed toil and charity abound toward the sick, the needy, and the poor.
    In witness whereof, I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington, this twenty-fifth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

  • United States. President (1897-1901: McKinley). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 29, 1900.
    It has pleased Almighty God to bring our nation in safety and honor through another year. The works of religion and charity have everywhere been manifest. Our country through all its extent has been blessed with abundant harvests. Labor and the great industries of the people have prospered beyond all precedent. Our commerce has spread over the world. Our power and influence in the cause of freedom and enlightenment have extended over distant seas and lands. The lives of our official representatives and many of our people in China have been marvelously preserved. We have been generally exempt from pestilence and other great calamities; and even the tragic visitation which overwhelmed the city of Galveston made evident the sentiments of sympathy and Christian charity by virtue of which we are one united people.
    Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States, do hereby appoint and set apart Thursday, the 29th of November next, to be observed by all the people of the United States, at home or abroad, as a day of thanksgiving and praise to Him who holds the nations in the hollow of His hand. I recommend that they gather in their several places of worship and devoutly give Him thanks for the prosperity wherewith He has endowed us, for seedtime and harvest, for the valor, devotion, and humanity of our armies and navies, and for all His benefits to us as individuals and as a nation; and that they humbly pray for the continuance of His divine favor, for concord and amity with other nations, and for righteousness and peace in all our ways.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this twenty-ninth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fifth.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 2, 1901.
    The season is nigh when, according to the time-hallowed custom of our people, the President appoints a day as the especial occasion for praise and thanksgiving to God. This Thanksgiving finds the people still bowed with sorrow for the death of a great and good President. We mourn President McKinley because we so loved and honored him; and the manner of his death should awaken in the breasts of our people a keen anxiety for the country, and at the same time a resolute purpose not to be driven by any calamity from the path of a strong, orderly, popular liberty, which, as a nation, we have thus far safely trod.
    Yet, in spite of this great disaster, it is nevertheless true that no people on earth have such abundant cause for thanksgiving as we have. The past year, in particular, has been one of peace and plenty. We have prospered in things material, and have been able to work for our own uplifting in things intellectual and spiritual. Let us remember that, as much has been given us, much will be expected from us, and that true homage comes from the heart as well as from the lips, and shows itself in deeds. We can best prove our thankfulness to the Almighty by the way in which on this earth and at this time each of us does his duty to his fellow-men.
    Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, do hereby designate as a day of general thanksgiving Thursday, the 28th of this present November, and do recommend that throughout the land the people cease from their wonted occupations, and at their several homes and places of worship reverently thank the giver of all good for the countless blessings of our national life.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this second day of November in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred and One and of the Independence of the United States the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 29, 1902.
    According to the yearly custom of our people, it falls upon the President at this season to appoint a day of festival and thanksgiving to God.
    Over a century and a quarter has passed since this country took its place among the nations of the earth, and during that time we have had on the whole more to be thankful for than has fallen to the lot of any other people. Generation after generation has grown to manhood and passed away. Each has had to bear its peculiar burdens, each to face its special crises, and each has known years of grim trial, when the country was menaced by malice domestic or foreign levy, when the hand of the Lord was heavy upon it in drouth or flood or pestilence, when in bodily distress and anguish of soul it paid the penalty of folly and a froward heart. Nevertheless, decade by decade, we have struggled onward and upward; we now abundantly enjoy material well-being, and under the favor of the Most High we are striving earnestly to achieve moral and spiritual uplifting. The year that has just closed has been one of peace and of overflowing plenty. Rarely has any people enjoyed greater prosperity than we are now enjoying. For this we render heartfelt and solemn thanks to the Giver of Good; and we seek to praise Him not by words only but by deeds, by the way in which we do our duty to ourselves and to our fellow men.
    Now, therefore, I, THEODORE ROOSEVELT, President of the United States, do hereby designate as a day of general thanksgiving Thursday, the twenty-seventh of the coming November, and do recommend that throughout the land the people cease from their ordinary occupations, and in their several homes and places of worship render thanks unto Almighty God for the manifold blessings of the past year.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and two and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-seventh.
    THEODORE ROOSEVELT

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 31, 1903.
    The season is at hand when, according to the customs of our people, it falls upon the President to appoint a day of praise and thanksgiving to God.
    During the last year the Lord has dealt bountifully with us, giving us peace at home and abroad, and the chance for our citizens to work for their welfare unhindered by war, famine, or plague. It behooves us not only to rejoice greatly because of what has been given us, but to accept it with a solemn sense of responsibility, realizing that under heaven it rests with us ourselves to show that we are worthy to use aright what has thus been intrusted to our care. In no other place and at no other time has the experiment of government of the people, by the people, for the people, been tried on so vast a scale as here in our own country in the opening years of the twentieth century. Failure would not only be a dreadful thing for us, but a dreadful thing for all mankind, because it would mean loss of hope for all who believe in the power and the righteousness of liberty.
    Therefore, in thanking God for the mercies extended to us in the past, we beseech Him that He may not withhold them in the future, and that our hearts may be roused to war steadfastly for good and against all the forces of evil, public and private. We pray for strength and light, so that in the coming years we may with cleanliness, fearlessness, and wisdom, do our allotted work on the earth in such manner as to show that we are not altogether unworthy of the blessings we have received.
    Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, do hereby designate as a day of general thanksgiving, Thursday, the 26th of the coming November, and do recommend that throughout the land people cease from their wonted occupations, and in their several homes and places of worship render thanks unto Almighty God for His manifold mercies.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 31st day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and three, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-eighth.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1904.
    It has pleased Almighty God to bring the American people in safety and honor through another year, and, in accordance with the long unbroken custom handed down to us by our forefathers, the time has come when a special day shall be set apart in which to thank Him, who holds all nations in the hollow of His hand, for the mercies thus vouchsafed to us. During the century and a quarter of our national life, we, as a people, have been blessed beyond all others, and for this we owe humble and heartfelt thanks to the author of all blessings.
    The year that has closed has been one of peace within our own borders as well as between us and all other nations. The harvests have been abundant, and those who work, whether with hand or brain, are prospering greatly. Reward has waited upon honest effort. We have been enabled to do our duty to ourselves and to others. Never has there been a time when religious and charitable effort have been more evident. Much has been given to us and much will be expected from us. We speak of what has been done by this nation in no spirit of boastfulness or vainglory, but with full and reverent realization that our strength is as nothing unless we are helped from above.
    Hitherto we have been given the heart and strength to do the tasks allotted to us as they severally arose. We are thankful for all that has been done for us in the past, and we pray that in the future we may be strengthened in the unending struggle to do our duty fearlessly and honestly, with charity and good will, with respect for ourselves and with love toward our fellow-men. In this great Republic, the effort to combine national strength with personal freedom is being tried on a scale more gigantic than ever before in the world's history. Our success will mean much, not only for ourselves, but for the future of all mankind, and every man or woman in our land should feel the grave responsibility resting upon him or her, for in the last analysis this success must depend upon the high average of our individual citizenship, upon the way in which each of us does his duty by himself and his neighbors.
    Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, do hereby appoint and set apart Thursday, the twenty-fourth of this November, to be observed as a day of festival and thanksgiving by all the people of the United States at home or abroad, and do recommend that on that day they cease from their ordinary occupations and gather in their several places of worship or in their homes, devoutly to give thanks unto almighty God for the benefits He has conferred upon us as individuals and as a nation, and to beseech Him that in the future His divine favor may be continued to us. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 1st day of November, in the year of our Lord One thousand nine hundred and four, and of the independence of the United States the One hundred and twenty-ninth.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 2, 1905.
    When nearly three centuries ago the first settlers came to the country which has now become this great republic they fronted not only hardship and privation, but terrible risk to their lives. In those grim years the custom grew of setting apart one day in each year for a special service of thanksgiving to the Almighty for preserving the people through the changing seasons. The custom has now become national and hallowed by immemorial usage. We live in easier and more plentiful times than our forefathers, the men who with rugged strength faced the rugged days; and yet the dangers to national life as quite as great now as at any previous time in our history.
    It is eminently fitting that once a year our people should set apart a day for praise and thanksgiving to the Giver of Good, and at the same time that they express their thankfulness for the abundant mercies received should manfully acknowledge their shortcomings and pledge themselves solemnly and in good faith to strive to overcome them.
    During the past year we have been blessed with bountiful crops. Our business prosperity has been great. No other people has ever stood on as high a level of material well-being as we now stand. We are not threatened by foes from without. The foes from whom we should pray to be delivered are our own passions, appetites, and follies; and against these there is always need that we should war.
    Therefore I now set apart Thursday, the 30th day of this November, as a day of thanksgiving for the past and of prayer for the future, and on that day I ask that throughout the land the people gather in their homes and places of worship and, in rendering thanks unto the Most High for the manifold blessings of the past year, consecrate themselves to a life of cleanliness, honor, and wisdom, so that this nation may do its allotted work on the earth in a manner worthy of those who founded it and of those who preserved it.
    Done at the city of Washington, this second day of November in the year of our Lord One thousand nine Hundred and five, and of the Independence of the United States the One hundred and Thirtieth.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 22, 1906.
    The time of year has come when, in accordance with the wise custom of our forefathers, it becomes my duty to set aside a special day of thanksgiving and praise to the Almighty because of the blessings we have received, and of prayer that these blessings may be continued. Yet another year of widespread well-being has passed. Never before in our history or in the history of any other nation has a people enjoyed more abounding material prosperity than is ours; a prosperity so general that it should rouse in us no spirit of reckless pride, and least of all a spirit of heedless disregard of our responsibilities; but rather a sober sense of our many blessings, and a resolute purpose under Providence, not to forfeit them by any action of our own.
    Material well-being, indispensable though it is, can never be anything but the foundation of true national greatness and happiness. If we build nothing upon this foundation, then our national life will be meaningless and empty as a house where only the foundation has been laid. Upon our material well-being must be built a superstructure of individual and national life in accordance with the laws of the highest morality, or else our prosperity itself will in the long run turn out a curse instead of a blessing. We should be both reverently thankful for what we have received, and earnestly bent upon turning it into a means of grace and not of destruction.
    Accordingly, I hereby set apart Thursday, the 29th day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and supplication, on which the people shall meet in their homes or their churches, devoutly to acknowledge all that has been given them, and to pray that they may in addition receive the power to use these gifts aright.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this the 22nd day of October in the year of our Lord 1906, and of the independence of the United States 131st.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 26, 1907.
    Once again the season of the year has come when, in accordance with the custom of our forefathers for generations past, the President appoints a day as the special occasion for all our people to give praise and thanksgiving to God.
    During the past year we have been free from famine, from pestilence, from war. We are at peace with all the rest of mankind. Our natural resources are at least as great as those of any other nation. We believe that in ability to develop and take advantage of these resources the average man of this nation stands at least as high as the average man of any other. Nowhere else in the world is there such an opportunity for a free people to develop to the fullest extent all its powers of body, of mind, and of that which stands above both body and mind - character.
    Much has been given us from on high, and much will rightly be expected of us in return. Into our care the ten talents have been entrusted; and we are to be pardoned neither if we squander and waste them, nor yet if we hide them in a napkin; for they must be fruitful in our hands. Ever throughout the ages, at all times and among all peoples, prosperity has been fraught with danger, and it behooves us to beseech the Giver of all things that we may not fall into lose of ease and luxury; that we may not lose our sense of moral responsibility; that we may not forget our duty to God, and to our neighbor.
    A great democracy like ours, a democracy based upon the principles of orderly liberty, can be perpetuated only if in the heart of ordinary citizens there dwells a keen sense of righteousness, and justice. We should earnestly pray that this spirit of righteousness and justice may grow in the hearts of all of us, and that our souls may be inclined ever more both toward the virtues that tell for gentleness and tenderness, for loving kindness and forbearance, one toward another, and toward those no less necessary virtues that make for manliness and rugged hardihood; for without these qualities neither nation nor individual can rise to the level of greatness.
    Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, do set apart Thursday, the 28th day of November, as a day for general Thanksgiving and Prayer, and on that day I recommend that the people shall cease from their daily work, and in their homes or in their churches, meet devoutly to thank the Almighty for the many and great blessings they have received in the past, and to pray that they may be given the strength so to order their lives as to deserve a continuation of these blessings in the future.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this the 26th day of October in the year of our Lord, 1907, and of the Independence of the United States, the 132nd.

  • United States. President (1901-1909: Roosevelt, Theodore). By the President of the United States of America. Thanksgiving Proclamation, October 31, 1908.
    Once again the season is at hand when, according to the ancient custom of our people, it becomes the duty of the President to appoint a day of prayer and of thanksgiving to God.
    Year by year this nation grows in strength and worldly power. During the century and a quarter that has elapsed since our entry into the circle of independent peoples, we have grown and prospered in material things to a degree never known before, and not now known in any other country. The thirteen colonies which struggled along the seacoast of the Atlantic and were hemmed in but a few miles west of tidewater by the Indian-haunted wilderness, have been transformed into the mightiest republic which the world has ever seen. Its domains stretch across the continent from one to the other of the two greatest oceans, and it exercises dominion alike in the arctic and tropic realms. The growth in wealth and population has surpassed even the growth in territory. Nowhere else in the world is the average of individual comfort and material well-being as high as in our fortunate land.
    For the very reason that in material well-being we have thus abounded, we owe it to the Almighty to show equal progress in moral and spiritual things. With a nation, as well the individuals who make up a nation, material well-being is an indispensable foundation. But the foundation avails nothing by itself. That life is wasted, and worse than wasted, which is spent in piling, heap upon heap, those things which minister merely to the pleasure of the body and to the power that rests only on wealth.
    Upon material well-being as a foundation must be raised the structure of the lofty life of the spirit, if this nation is properly to fulfill its great mission and to accomplish all that we so ardently hope and desire. The things of the body are good; the things of the intellect better; but best of all are the things of the soul; for, in the nation as in the individual, in the long run it is character that counts. Let us therefore as a people set our faces resolutely against evil, and with broad charity, with kindness and good will toward all men, but with unflinching determination to smite down wrong, strive with all the strength that is given us for righteousness in public and in private life.
    Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, do set apart Thursday, the 26th day of November next, as a day of general thanksgiving and prayer, and on that day I recommend that the people shall cease from their daily work, and, in their homes or in their churches, meet devoutly to thank the Almighty for the many and great blessings they have received in the past, and to pray that they may be given strength so to order their lives as to deserve a continuation of these blessings in the future.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this thirty-first day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eight, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-third.

  • United States. President (1909-1913: Taft). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 15, 1909.
    The season of the year has returned when, in accordance with the reverent custom established by our forefathers, the people of the United States are wont to meet in their usual places of worship on a day of thanksgiving appointed by the civil magistrate, to return thanks to God for the great mercies and benefits which they have enjoyed.
    During this past year we have been highly blessed. No great calamities of flood or tempest or epidemic sickness have befallen us. We have lived in quietness, undisturbed by wars or rumors of war. Peace and the plenty of bounteous crops and of great industrial production animate a cheerful and resolute people to all the renewed energies of beneficent industry and material and moral progress. It is altogether fitting that we should humbly and gratefully acknowledge the divine source of these blessings.
    Therefore, I hereby appoint Thursday, the 25th day of November, as a day of general Thanksgiving, and I call upon the people on that day, laying aside their usual vocations, to repair to their churches and unite in appropriate services of praise and thanks to Almighty God.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the city of Washington, this 15th day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and nine, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-fourth.

  • United States. President (1909-1913: Taft). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1910.
    This year of 1910 is drawing to a close. The records of population and harvests, which are the index of progress, show vigorous national growth and the health and prosperous wellbeing of our communities throughout this land and in our possessions beyond the seas. These blessings have not descended upon us in restricted measure, but overflow and abound. They are the blessings and bounty of God.
    We continue to be at peace with the rest of the world. In all essential matters our relations with other peoples are harmonious, with an ever growing reality of friendliness and depth of recognition of mutual dependence. It is especially to be noted that during the past year great progress has been achieved in the case of arbitration and the peaceful settlement of international disputes.
    Now therefore I, William Howard Taft, President of the United States of America, in accordance with the wise custom of the civil magistrates since the first settlement in this land and with the rule established from the foundation of this Government, do appoint Thursday, November 24, 1910, as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer, enjoining the people upon that day to meet in their churches for the praise of the Almighty God and to return heartfelt thanks to Him for all His goodness and loving kindness.

  • United States. President (1909-1913: Taft). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 30, 1911.
    The people of this land having by long sanction and practice set apart toward the close of each passing year a day on which to cease from their labors and assemble for the purpose of giving praise to Him who is the author of the blessings they have enjoyed, it is my duty as Chief Executive to designate at this time the day for the fulfillment of this devout purpose.
    Our country has been signally favored in many ways. The round of the seasons has brought rich harvests. Our industries have thrived far beyond our domestic needs; the productions of our labor are daily finding enlarged markets abroad. We have been free from the curses of pestilence, of famine and of war. Our national councils have furthered the cause of peace in other lands, and the spirit of benevolence has brought us into closer touch with other peoples, to the strengthening of the bonds of fellowship and good will that link us to our comrades in the universal brotherhood of nations. Strong in the sense of our own rights and inspired by as strong a sense of the rights of others, we live in peace and harmony with the world. Rich in the priceless possessions and abundant resources wherewith the unstinted bounty of God has endowed us, we are unselfishly glad when other peoples pass onward to prosperity and peace. That the great privileges we enjoy may continue and that each coming year may see our country more firmly established in the regard and esteem of our fellow nations is the prayer that should arise in every thankful heart.
    Wherefore I, William Howard Taft, President of the United States, designate Thursday, the 30th day of November next, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and I earnestly call upon my countrymen and upon all that dwell under the flag of our beloved country then to meet in their accustomed places of worship to join in offering prayer to Almighty God and devout thanks for the loving mercies He has given to us.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Chicago, this 30th day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eleven and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-sixth.

  • United States. President (1909-1913: Taft). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 7, 1912.
    A God-fearing nation, like ours, owes it to its inborn and sincere sense of moral duty to testify its devout gratitude to the All-giver for the countless benefits it has enjoyed. For many years it has been customary at the close of the year for the national Executive to call upon his fellow-countrymen to offer praise and thanks to God for the manifold blessings vouchsafed to them in the past and to unite in earnest suppliance for their continuance.
    The year now drawing to a close has been notably favorable to our fortunate land. at peace within and without; free from the perturbations and calamities that have afflicted other peoples. rich in harvests so abundant and in industries so productive that the overflow of our prosperity has advantaged the whole world; strong in the steadfast conservation of the heritage of self-government bequeathed to us by the wisdom of our fathers and firm in the resolve to transmit that heritage unimpaired but rather improved by good use, to our children and our children?s children for all time to come, the people of this country have abounding cause for contented gratitude.
    Wherefore, I, William Howard Taft, President of the United States of America, in pursuance of long-established usage, and in response to the wish of the American people, invite my countrymen, wheresoever they may sojourn, to join, on Thursday the twenty-eighth day of this month of November, in appropriate ascription of praise and thanks to god for the good gifts that have been our portion, and in humble prayer that His great mercies toward us may endure.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington this seventh day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twelve and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-seventh.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation.
    The season is at hand in which it has been our long respected custom as a people to turn in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for his manifold mercies and blessings to us as a nation. The year that has just passed has been marked in a peculiar degree by manifestations of His gracious and beneficent providence. We have not only had peace throughout our own borders and with the nations of the world but that peace has been brightened by constantly multiplying evidences of genuine friendship, of mutual sympathy and understanding, and of the happy operation of many elevating influences both of ideal and of practice. The nation has not only been prosperous but has proved its capacity to take calm counsel amidst the rapid movement of affairs and deal with its own life in a spirit of candor, righteousness and comity. We have seen the practical completion of a great work at the Isthmus of Panama which not only exemplifies the nation?s abundant resources to accomplish what it will and the distinguished skill and capacity of its public servants but also promises the beginning of a new age, of new contacts, new neighborhoods, new sympathies, new bonds, and new achievements of cooperation and peace. "Righteousness exalteth a nation" and "peace upon earth, good will towards men" furnish the only foundations upon which can be built the lasting achievements of the human spirit. The year has brought us the satisfactions of work well done and fresh visions of our duty which will make the work of the future better still.
    Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday the twenty-seventh of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout the land to cease from their wonted occupations and in their several homes and places of worship render thanks to almighty God.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington, this in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirteen and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-eighth.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation,October 28, 1914.
    It has long been the honoured custom of our people to turn in the fruitful autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for his many blessings and mercies to us as a nation. The year that is now drawing to a close since we last observed our day of national thanksgiving has been, while a year of discipline because of the mighty forces of war and of change which have disturbed the world, also a year of special blessing for us.
    It has been vouchsafed to us to remain at peace, with honour, and in some part to succour the suffering and supply the needs of those who are in want. We have been privileged by our own peace and self-control in some degree to steady the counsels and shape the hopes and purposes of a day of fear and distress. Our people have looked upon their own life as a nation with deeper comprehension, a fuller realization of their responsibilities as well as of their blessings, and a keener sense of the moral and practical significance of what their part among the nations of the world may come to be.
    The hurtful effects of foreign war in their own industrial and commercial affairs have made them feel the more fully and see the more clearly their mutual interdependence upon one another and has stirred them to a helpful cooperation such as they have seldom practiced before. They have been quickened by a great moral stimulation. Their unmistakable ardour for peace, their earnest pity and disinterested sympathy for those who are suffering, their readiness to help and to think of the needs of others, has revealed them to themselves as well as to the world.
    Our crops will feed all who need food; the self-possession of our people amidst the most serious anxieties and difficulties and the steadiness and resourcefulness of our business men will serve other nations as well as our own.
    The business of the country has been supplied with new instrumentalities and the commerce of the world with new channels of trade and intercourse. The Panama Canal has been opened to the commerce of the nations. The two continents of America have been bound in closer ties of friendship. new instrumentalities of international trade have been created which will be also new instrumentalities of acquaintance, intercourse, and mutual service. Never before have the people of the United States been so situated for their own advantage or the advantage of their neighbours or so equipped to serve themselves and mankind.
    Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday the twenty-sixth of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout the land to cease from their wonted occupations and in their several homes and places of worship render thanks to Almighty God.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington, this twenty-eighth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fourteen and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-ninth.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 20, 1915.
    It has long been the honoured custom of our people to turn in the fruitful autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for his many blessings and mercies to us as a nation. The year that is now drawing to a close since we last observed our day of national thanksgiving has been, while a year of discipline because of the mighty forces of war and of change which have disturbed the world, also a year of special blessing for us.
    Another year of peace has been vouchsafed us; another year in which not only to take thought of our duty to ourselves and to mankind but also to adjust ourselves to the many responsibilities thrust upon us by a war which has involved almost the whole of Europe. We have been able to assert our rights and the rights of mankind without breach of friendship with the great nations with whom we have had to deal; and while we have asserted rights we have been able also to perform duties and exercise privileges of succour and helpfulness which should serve to demonstrate our desire to make the offices of friendship the means of truly disinterested and unselfish service. Our ability to serve all who could avail themselves of our services in the midst of crisis has been increased, by a gracious Providence, by more and more abundant crops. our ample financial resources have enabled us to steady the markets of the world and facilitate necessary movements of commerce which the war might otherwise have rendered impossible; and our people have come more and more to a sober realization of the part they have been called upon to play in a time when all the world is shaken by unparalleled distresses and disasters. The extraordinary circumstances of such a time have done much to quicken our national consciousness and deepen and confirm our confidence in the principles of peace and freedom by which we have always sought to be guided. Out of darkness and perplexity have come firmer counsels of policy and clearer perceptions of the essential welfare of the nation. We have prospered while other peoples were at war, but our prosperity has been vouchsafed us, we believe, only that we might the better perform the functions which war rendered it impossible for them to perform.
    Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday the twenty-fifth of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout the land to cease from their wonted occupations and in their several homes and places of worship render thanks to Almighty God.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington this twentieth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fifteen and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and fortieth.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 17, 1916.
    It has long been the custom of our people to turn in the fruitful autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for His many blessings and mercies to us as a nation. The year that has elapsed since we last observed our day of thanksgiving has been rich in blessings to us as a people, but the whole face of the world has been darkened by war. In the midst of our peace and happiness, our thoughts dwell with painful disquiet upon the struggles and sufferings of the nations at war and of the peoples upon whom war has brought disaster without choice or possibility of escape on their part. We cannot think of our own happiness without thinking also of their pitiful distress.
    Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do appoint Thursday, the thirtieth of November, as a day of National Thanksgiving and Prayer, and urge and advise the people to resort to their several places of worship on that day to render thanks to Almighty God for the blessings of peace and unbroken prosperity which He has bestowed upon our beloved country in such unstinted measure. And I also urge and suggest our duty in this our day of peace and abundance to think in deep sympathy of the stricken peoples of the world upon whom the curse and terror of war has so pitilessly fallen, and to contribute out of our abundant means to the relief of their suffering. Our people could in no better way show their real attitude towards the present struggle of the nations than by contributing out of their abundance to the relief of the suffering which war has brought in its train.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done at the City of Washington this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and sixteen and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and forty-first.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, Novemer 7, 1917.
    It has long been the honored custom of our people to turn in the fruitful autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for His many blessings and mercies to us as a nation. That custom we can follow now even in the midst of the tragedy of a world shaken by war and immeasurable disaster, in the midst of sorrow and great peril, because even amidst the darkness that has gathered about us we can see the great blessings God has bestowed upon us, blessings that are better than mere peace of mind and prosperity of enterprise.
    We have been given the opportunity to serve mankind as we once served ourselves in the great day of our Declaration of Independence, by taking up arms against a tyranny that threatened to master and debase men everywhere and joining with other free peoples in demanding for all the nations of the world what we then demanded and obtained for ourselves. In this day of the revelation of our duty not only to defend our own rights as nation but to defend also the rights of free men throughout the world, there has been vouchsafed us in full and inspiring measure the resolution and spirit of united action. We have been brought to one mind and purpose. A new vigor of common counsel and common action has been revealed in us. We should especially thank God that in such circumstances, in the midst of the greatest enterprise the spirits of men have ever entered upon, we have, if we but observe a reasonable and practicable economy, abundance with which to supply the needs of those associated with us as well as our own. A new light shines about us. The great duties of a new day awaken a new and greater national spirit in us. We shall never again be divided or wonder what stuff we are made of.
    And while we render thanks for these things let us pray Almighty God that in all humbleness of spirit we may look always to Him for guidance; that we may be kept constant in the spirit and purpose of service; that by His grace our minds may be directed and our hands strengthened; and that in His good time liberty and security and peace and the comradeship of a common justice may be vouchsafed all the nations of the earth.
    Wherefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout the land to cease upon that day from their ordinary occupations and in their several homes and places of worship to render thanks to God, the great ruler of nations.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done in the District of Columbia this 7th day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventeen and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and forty-second.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 16, 1918.
    It has long been our custom to turn in the autumn of the year in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God for His many blessings and mercies to us as a nation. This year we have special and moving cause to be grateful and to rejoice. God has in His good pleasure given us peace. It has not come as a mere cessation of arms, a mere relief from the strain and tragedy of war. It has come as a great triumph of right. Complete victory has brought us, not peace alone, but the confident promise of a new day as well in which justice shall replace force and jealous intrigue among the nations. Our gallant armies have participated in a triumph which is not marred or stained by any purpose of selfish aggression. In a righteous cause they have won immortal glory and have nobly served their nation in serving mankind. God has indeed been gracious. We have cause for such rejoicing as revives and strengthens in us all the best traditions of our national history. A new day shines about us, in which our hearts take new courage and look forward with new hope to new and greater duties.
    While we render thanks for these things, let us not forget to seek the Divine guidance in the performance of those duties, and divine mercy and forgiveness for all errors of act or purpose, and pray that in all that we do we shall strengthen the ties of friendship and mutual respect upon which we must assist to build the new structure of peace and good will among the nations.
    Wherefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and invite the people throughout the land to cease upon that day from their ordinary occupations and in their several homes and places of worship to render thanks to God, the ruler of nations.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done in the district of Columbia this sixteenth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eighteen and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and forty-third.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1919.
    The season of the year has again arrived when the people of the United States are accustomed to unite in giving thanks to Almighty God for the blessings which He has conferred upon our country during the twelve months that have passed. A year ago our people poured out their hearts in praise and thanksgiving that through divine aid the right was victorious and peace had come to the nations which had so courageously struggled in defense of human liberty and justice. Now that the stern task is ended and the fruits of achievement are ours, we look forward with confidence to the dawn on an era where the sacrifices of the nations will find recompense in a world at peace.
    But to attain the consummation of the great work to which the American people devoted their manhood and the vast resources of their country they should, as they give thanks to God, reconsecrate themselves to those principles of right which triumphed through His merciful goodness. Our gratitude can find no more perfect expression than to bulwark with loyalty and patriotism those principles for which the free peoples of the earth fought and died.
    During the past year we have had much to make us grateful. In spite of the confusion in our economic life resulting from the war we have prospered. Our harvests have been plentiful, and of our abundance we have been able to render succor to less favored nations. Our democracy remains unshaken in a world torn with political and social unrest. Our traditional ideals are still our guides in the path of progress and civilization.
    These great blessings, vouchsafed to us, for which we devoutly give thanks, should arouse us to a fuller sense of our duty to ourselves and to mankind to see to it that nothing that we may do shall mar the completeness of the victory which we helped to win. No selfish purpose animated us in becoming participants in the world war, and with a like spirit of unselfishness we should strive to aid by our example and by our cooperation in realizing the enduring welfare of all peoples and in bringing into being a world ruled by friendship and good will.
    Wherefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-seventh day of November next, for observance as a day of thanksgiving and prayer by my fellow-countrymen, inviting them to cease on that day from their ordinary tasks and to unite in their homes and in their several places of worship in ascribing praise and thanksgiving to God the Author of all blessings and the Master of our destinies.
    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done in the District of Columbia this 5th day of November in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and nineteen, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and forty-fourth.

  • United States. President (1913-1921: Wilson). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 12, 1920.
    The season again approaches when it behooves us to turn from the distractions and preoccupations of our daily life, that we may contemplate the mercies which have been vouchsafed to us, and render heartfelt and unfeigned thanks unto God for His manifold goodness.
    This is an old observance of the American people, deeply imbedded in our thought and habit. The burdens and the stresses of life have their own insistence.
    We have abundant cause for thanksgiving. The lesions of the war are rapidly healing. The great army of freemen, which America sent to the defense of Liberty, returning to the grateful embrace of the nation, has resumed the useful pursuits of peace, as simply and as promptly as it rushed to arms in obedience to the country?s call. The equal justice of our laws has received steady vindication in the support of a law-abiding people against various and sinister attacks, which have reflected only the baser agitations of war, now happily passing.
    In plenty, security and peace, our virtuous and self-reliant people face the future, its duties and its opportunities. May we have vision to discern our duties; the strength, both of hand and resolve, to discharge them; and the soundness of heart to realize that the truest opportunities are those of service.
    In a spirit, then, of devotion and stewardship we should give thanks in our hearts, and dedicate ourselves to the service of God?s merciful and loving purposes to His children.
    Wherefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States do hereby designate Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of November next as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and I call upon my countrymen to cease from their ordinary tasks and avocations upon that day, giving it up to the remembrance of God and His blessings, and their dutiful and grateful acknowledgment.
    In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
    Done in the district of Columbia this twelfth day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and twenty, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and forty-fifth.
    WOODROW WILSON

  • United States. President (1921-1923: Harding). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 31, 1921.

  • United States. President (1921-1923: Harding). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 2, 1922.

  • United States. President (1923-1929: Coolidge). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1923.

  • United States. President (1923-1929: Coolidge). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1924.

  • United States. President (1923-1929: Coolidge). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 26, 1925.

  • United States. President (1923-1929: Coolidge). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 30, 1926.

  • United States. President (1923-1929: Coolidge). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 26, 1927.

  • United States. President (1923-1929: Coolidge). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 23, 1928.

  • United States. President (1929-1933: Hoover). By the President of the United States of America. A ProclamationNovember 5, 1929.

  • United States. President (1929-1933: Hoover). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 6, 1930.

  • United States. President (1929-1933: Hoover). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 3, 1931.

  • United States. President (1929-1933: Hoover). 422 - Message on the Special Statewide Observance of Thanksgiving Day in Arkansas, November 26, 1931.

  • United States. President (1929-1933: Hoover). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 3, 1932.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 177 - A Thanksgiving Day Proclamation. November 21, 1933.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 185 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, November 15, 1934.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 176 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, November 12, 1935.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 219 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, November 12, 1936.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 163 - Proclamation 2260 on Thanksgiving Day. November 9, 1937.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 151 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, November 19, 1938.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 148 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, October 31, 1939.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 136 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, November 9, 1940.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 125 - Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, November 8, 1941.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). 134 - Proclamation 2571 on Thanksgiving DayNovember 26, 1942.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 11, 1943.

  • United States. President (1933-1945: Roosevelt, Franklin D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1944.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). 103 - Statement by the President: The Jewish New Year, August 15, 1945.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 12, 1945.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). 52 - Address in Columbus at a Conference of the Federal Council of Churches. , March 6, 1946.

    As your President, I appeal to you again-and to all Americans everywhere--to prove your faith and your belief in the teachings of God by doing your share to save the starving millions in Europe, in Asia, in Africa. Share your food by eating less, and prevent millions from dying of starvation. Reduce your abundance so that others may have a crust of bread. In short, prove yourselves worthy of the liberty and dignity which you have preserved on this earth, by helping those less fortunate who have been starved by the dictators for so many long years and who still starve even in liberation.

    Ours should be a continuous thanksgiving for the fact of victory and for the blessings which are still with us in this land. The brave men and valiant women who made this possible under God will inspire us to face our new problems with resolution. They are problems which call for the best in us. As long as we remain true to the spirit of these men and women, to the religious faith which carried them to victory we shall not fail.

    We have this America not because we are of a particular faith, not because our ancestors sailed from a particular foreign port. We have our America because of our common aspiration to remain free and our determined purpose to achieve for ourselves, and for our children, a more abundant life in keeping with our highest ideals.

    Let us determine to carry on in that same spirit--in a spirit of tolerance, and understanding for all men and for all nations--in the spirit of God and religious unity.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 28, 1946.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 10, 1947.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 12, 1948.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 10, 1949.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 19, 1950.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). 68 - Address at the Cornerstone Laying of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, April 3, 1951.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 1, 1951.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 8, 1952.

  • United States. President (1945-1953: Truman, Harry S.). 337 - Remarks in Alexandria, Va., at the Cornerstone Laying of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, November 23, 1952.

    As our forefathers pushed the frontier into the wilderness, they took their churches with them. The spires of the meetinghouses rose in the midst of the new settlements--in the Appalachians, across the plains of the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys, and on to the Pacific coast.

    Today, the main stream of our growth is no longer into the wilderness. Frequently, it is taking place in the oldest communities in our land, as it is right here in Alexandria. But churches are still going forward with the new internal expansion of our country. And as an example, a few years ago there was only one church of your denomination in this city of Alexandria. Today, there are four, and the other denominations have increased as well as the Presbyterian. I am happy to say the Baptists have, too.

    There are some who foolishly say that religion is dead or dying in this country. They have not consulted the statistics. The facts are that the churches, and the church memberships, are growing. Perhaps this growth is not rapid enough--perhaps it is not as great as we might wish. Real Christians can never be satisfied with the progress of their faith. But growth there is--and vitality, and widening influence.

    It is just as important for the future of this country that the churches keep pace with our present expansion as it was for our forefathers to carry their faith with them when they laid the foundations of this great Nation. Democracy is first and foremost a spiritual force. It is built upon a spiritual basis--and on a belief in God and an observance of moral principles. And in the long run only the church can provide that basis. Our founders knew this truth--and we will neglect it at our peril.

    You can see this truth demonstrated in the history of your own denomination. Every denomination has made its particular contribution to our Nation, and certainly the Presbyterians have done their share. One of the great Presbyterians of colonial times was John Witherspoon, the president of Princeton University and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He taught the doctrines of complete religious liberty and national independence. And today many of the finest men and women in our Government, as this congregation bears witness, are Presbyterians. Indeed, the democratic nature of our Government owes much to the democratic forms and the democratic experience of the Presbyterian church. I can brag a lot on the Presbyterians because I started a Sunday School in the Presbyterian Church when I was 6 years old, and that is where I met Mrs. Truman.

    This is the Sunday before Thanksgiving. In Thanksgiving, we have a purely American holiday--fashioned out of our own history, and testifying to the religious background of our national life. That day expresses what we mean when we say that out form of government rests on a spiritual foundation.

    Yet, we must not congratulate ourselves too much upon the past, or upon the purely physical growth of our churches in the present. Our churches must keep pace not only with the changes in our physical development, but also, and more importantly, with the changes of social problems. Our churches must not become a place to hide from the facts of the world about us, nor a mere badge of social respectability. Too often our churches have been blind to their most important function, which is to bring about the application of religious principles to our daily lives and in our work. We must all wage a ceaseless war against injustice in our society. The churches in particular are a force which should fight for brotherhood, and decency, and better lives for all our people.

    In foreign affairs, as well as in our domestic affairs, the churches should hold up the standard and point the way. The only hope of mankind for enduring peace lies in the realm of the spiritual. The teachings of the Christian faith recognize the worth of every human soul before Almighty God. The teachings of the Christian faith are a sure defense against the godlessness and the brutality of ideologies which deny the value of the individual. We must try to find ways to carry these spiritual concepts into the field of world relations. The point 4 program is one of the ways in which we can do this. That program reflects our belief that we are all our brothers' keepers. And it is an evidence of our faith that by following the path of justice and righteousness we can turn back the dark forces that seek to plunge the earth again into savagery.

    It is from a strong and vital church--from the strength and vitality of all our churches--that government must draw its vision. In the teachings of our Savior there is no room for bigotry, for discrimination, for the embittered struggle of class against class, or for the hostilities of nation against nation. St. Paul, in writing to the early church at Colosse, said, "Here there cannot be Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, freeman, but Christ is all, and in all."

    Here are the seeds of our vision of society. But we cannot keep that vision strong, or carry it out, without God's help. And the churches must help us to keep that vision always before us. Religious faith is the strength of our Nation, and the hope of all mankind.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 7, 1953.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 6, 1954.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 11, 1955.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 12, 1956.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 8, 1957.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 31, 1958.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1959.

  • United States. President (1953-1961: Eisenhower, Dwight D.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 11, 1960.

  • United States. President (1961-1963: Kennedy, John F.). 156 - Message From the President on the Occasion of the Dedication of the Inter-Faith Chapel, Kings Point, New York, May 1, 1961.

  • United States. President (1961-1963: Kennedy, John F.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 28, 1961.

  • United States. President (1961-1963: Kennedy, John F.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 7, 1962.

  • United States. President (1961-1963: Kennedy, John F.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1963.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). 10 - Statement by the President: Thanksgiving Day, November 26, 1963.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). 12 - The President's Thanksgiving Day Address to the Nation, November 28, 1963.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 13, 1964.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). 779 - Thanksgiving Day Message to Members of the Armed Forces, November 25, 1964.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 11, 1965.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). 626 - The President's Thanksgiving Day Message to Members of the Armed Forces, November 24, 1965.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 18, 1966.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 9, 1967.

  • United States. President (1963-1969: Johnson, Lyndon B.). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 15, 1968.

  • United States. President (1969-1974: Nixon). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1970.

  • United States. President (1969-1974: Nixon). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 5, 1971.

  • United States. President (1969-1974: Nixon). 373 - Thanksgiving Day Message to the Armed Forces, November 25, 1971.

  • United States. President (1969-1974: Nixon). Proclamation 4170 - Thanksgiving Day, 1972, November 17th, 1972. By the President of the United States of America, A Proclamation. -- When the first settlers gathered to offer their thanks to the God who had protected them on the edge of a wilderness, they established anew on American shores a thanksgiving tradition as old as Western man himself.
    'From Moses at the Red Sea to Jesus preparing to feed the multitudes, the Scriptures summon us to words and deeds of gratitude, even before divine blessings are fully perceived. From Washington kneeling at Valley Forge to the prayer of an astronaut circling the moon, our own history repeats that summons and proves its practicality.'

  • United States. President (1969-1974: Nixon). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, January 26, 1973. 18 - Proclamation 4181 - National Moment of Prayer and Thanksgiving.

  • United States. President (1969-1974: Nixon). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 16, 1973.

  • United States. President (1974-1977: Ford). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 11, 1974.

  • United States. President (1974-1977: Ford). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, November 4, 1975.

  • United States. President (1974-1977: Ford). 694 - Remarks for Thanksgiving Day., November 26, 1975.

  • United States. President (1974-1977: Ford). By the President of the United States of America. A Proclamation, October 25, 1976.


    Sermons and Discourses

  • Anonymous. "Star Spangled Banner." Daily Cleveland Herald, October 12, 1819. Third column. Detail on the circumstances of composing "The Star Spangled Banner." Also, "Thanksgiving," in column two. Thanksgiving days are appointed by Gov. Everett of Massachusetts and Gov. Ellsworth of Connecticut. "This time-honored New England custom of setting apart a day of general thanksgiving after the in-gathering of the harvest, is worthy of imitation throughout the land."

  • Anonymous. "Ingersoll as a Kicker". The Atlanta Constitution, November 28, 1890, p. 4.

  • Anonymous. Thanksgiving Day. Evening Bulletin, v. 8, n. 41. November 24, 1881, p.1. General Thanksgiving coverage.

  • Adams, Samuel, 1722-1803. Samuel Adams to Samuel P. Savage and James Warren, October 26, 1777. From Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 8, September 19, 1777 - January 31, 1778.

    "I heartily congratulate you on the entire Victory obtained by General Gates over Burgoin. This is a Striking Instance of the Truth of the Observation in Holy Writ "Pride goeth before a Fall." Our sincere Acknowledgments of Gratitude are due to the supreme Disposer of all Events. I suppose Congress will recommend that a Day be set apart through out the United States for solemn Thanksgiving.

    "I rejoyce that my Friend General Gates, after what had happend, is honord by Providence as the Instrument in this great Affair."

    Samuel Adams to James Warren: "I hope our Countrymen will render the just Tribute of Praise to the Supreme Ruler for these signal Instances of his Interposition in favor of a People struggling for their Liberties. Congress will, I suppose recommend the setting apart one Day of publick Thanksgiving to be observd throughout the united States."

    "I heartily congratulate you on the entire Victory obtained by General Gates over Burgoin. This is a Striking Instance of the Truth of the Observation in Holy Writ "Pride goeth before a Fall." Our sincere Acknowledgments of Gratitude are due to the supreme Disposer of all Events. I suppose Congress will recommend that a Day be set apart through out the United States for solemn Thanksgiving.

    "I rejoyce that my Friend General Gates, after what had happend, is honord by Providence as the Instrument in this great Affair."

    Samuel Adams to James Warren: "I hope our Countrymen will render the just Tribute of Praise to the Supreme Ruler for these signal Instances of his Interposition in favor of a People struggling for their Liberties. Congress will, I suppose recommend the setting apart one Day of publick Thanksgiving to be observd throughout the united States."

  • Allen, John. An Oration on the beauties of liberty, or The Essential rights of the Americans. Delivered at the Second Baptist-Church in Boston, upon the last annual thanksgiving, Dec. 3d, 1772. Dedicated to the Right Honourable the Earl of Dartmouth. Published by the earnest request of many. By a British Bostonian. The fourth edition, carefully corrected by the author, in which are many additions, particularly those four pages which were left out of the last editions. With some strictures on the eternal right of mankind, liberty of conscience. And remarks on the rights and liberties of the Africans, inserted by particular desire.
    xxix, 30-80 p. 19 cm. (4to)

  • Allin, James. What shall I render! A Thanksgiving Sermon preached at Brooklin, Nov. 8th, 1722. From Psalm CXVI. 12. By James Allin, M.A. and Pastor of the church there. [Three lines from Genesis]. Boston, N.E., 1722.

  • Andrews, John. A Sermon, delivered February 19, 1795, being a day of public Thanksgiving, throughout the United States of America. By John Andrews, A.M. Junior Pastor of the First Church in Newburyport. Printed at Newburyport [Mass.], [1795].

  • Austin, Samuel. A Sermon, delivered at Worcester, on the day of public Thanksgiving, observed throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, December 15th, MDCCXCVI. By Samuel Austin, A.M. Printed at Worcester, MDCCXCVII [1797].

  • Avery, David. The Lord is to be praised for the triumphs of his power. A Sermon, preached at Greenwich, in Connecticut, on the 18th of December 1777. Being a general Thanksgiving through the United American States. By David Avery, V.D.M. Chaplain to Col. Sherburne's regiment. [One line from Psalms]. Norwich [Conn.], 1778.

  • Baldwin, Thomas, 1753-1825. A Sermon, delivered February 19, 1795: being the day of public Thanksgiving throughout the United States. By Thomas Baldwin, A.M. Pastor of the Second Baptist Church in Boston. Boston, 1795.

  • Barnard, Thomas. A Sermon, delivered on the day of national Thanksgiving, February 19, 1795. By Thomas Barnard, D.D. Minister of the North Church in Salem. [Salem, Mass.], MDCCXCV. [1795].

  • Barton, Samuel, 1647 or 8-1715. A Sermon preach'd before the Honourable House of Commons at St. Margaret's Westminster, upon the 16th of April, 1696: being a day of thanksgiving unto Almighty God for discovering and disappointing an horrid and barbarous conspiracy of papists and other traiterous persons to assassinate and murder His Most Gracious Majesty's royal person and for delivering this kingdom from an invasion intended by the French / by Samuel Barton. London: Printed for Tho. Cockerill, Senr. and Junr. ..., 1696. [4], 32 pp.

  • Bates, John. Two (united) are better than one alone. A Thanksgiving Sermon upon the union of the two kingdoms, of England and Scotland, preach'd at Hackney, May 1. 1707. By J. Bates, M.A. London, 1707.

  • Benezet, Anthony, 1713-1784. Thoughts on the Nature of War: A Thanksgiving Sermon. Transcription.

  • Bloomfield. Political Discourse, No. 10. Containing Some Thoughts on the Advantages of American Independence. Written for a Day of Thanksgiving, April 1778. [sic] United States Magazine, September 1779. Also, An ACT for Establishing the Constitution of the State of South Carolina, passed the 19th day of March, 1778.

  • Boardman, Henry (Henry Augustus), 1808-1880. The Federal Judiciary: A Thanksgiving Discourse. Philadelphia: W.S. & A. Martien, 1862. 54 pp.; 22 cm.

  • Boardman, Henry (Henry Augustus), 1808-1880. The Low value set upon human life in the United States: a discourse delivered on Thanksgiving-day, November 24th, 1853, by H. A. Boardman, D. D. Philadelphia, J. M. Wilson, 1853. 32 pp. 23 cm.

  • Bradford, Ebenezer. The Nature and manner of giving thanks to God, illustrated. A Sermon, delivered on the day of the national Thanksgiving February 19, 1795. By Ebenezer Bradford, A.M. Pastor of the First Church in Rowley. Published by desire. Boston, M,DCC,XCV. [1795].

  • Bradford, William, 1590-1657. Bradford's History "Of Plimoth Plantation". From the original manuscript. With a report of the proceedings incident to the return of the manuscript to Massachusetts. Printed under the direction of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, by order of the General Court. Boston: Wright & Potter Printing Co., State Printers, 1898. lxxvii, 555 pp. front., ports., facsims. 25 cm. Also in Word, PDF.

    "I may not here omite how, notwithstand all their great paines & indnstrie, and ye great hops of a large cropp, the Lord seemed to blast, & take away the same, and to threaten further & more sore famine unto them, by a great drought which continued from ye 3. weeke in May, till about ye midle of July, without any raine, and with great heat (for ye most parte), insomuch as ye corne begane to wither away, though it was set with fishe, the moysture wherof helped it much. Yet at length it begane to languish sore, and some of ye drier grounds were partched like withered hay, part wherof was never recovered. Upon which they sett a parte a solemne day of humilliation, to seek ye Lord by humble & fervente prayer, in this great distrese. And he was pleased to give them a gracious & speedy answer, both to their owne, & the lndeans admiration, that lived amongest them. For all ye morning, and greatest part of the day, it was clear weather & very hotte, and not a cloud or any signe of raine to be seen, yet toward evening it begane to overcast, and shortly after to raine, with shuch sweete and gentle showers, as gave them cause of rejoyceing, & blesing God. It came, without either wind, or thunder, or any violence, and by degreese in yt abundance, as that ye earth was thorowly were and soked therwith. Which did so apparently revive & quicken ye decayed Corne & other fruits, as was wonderfull to see, and made ye Indeans astonished to behold; and afterwards the Lord sent them shuch seasonable showers, with enterchange of faire warme weather, as, through his blessing, caused a fruitfull & liberall harvest, to their no small comforte and rejoycing. For which mercie (in time conveniente) they also sett aparte a day of thanksgiveing. This being overslipt in its place, I thought meet here to inserte ye same."

  • Brockway, Thomas, 1745-1807. America saved, or Divine glory displayed, in the late war with Great Britain: A thanksgiving sermon, preached in Lebanon, Second Society, and now offered to the public, at the desire of a number of the hearers. / By Thomas Brockway, A.M. Pastor of the church in said society. [Five lines of quotations] Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, 1784. 24 pp.; 19 cm. (12mo)

  • Brown, John. A Discourse delivered on the day of the annual provincial Thanksgiving, December 6. 1770. By John Browne, A.M. Pastor of the church in Cohassett. [Three lines of Scripture texts]. Boston, New-England, MDCCLXXI. [1771].

  • Buckminster, Joseph. A Discourse delivered in the First Church of Christ at Portsmouth, on Thursday December 11, 1783; being the day recommended by the Honorable Congress for a general Thanksgiving throughout the United States of America, after the ratification of a treaty of peace, in the ultimate acknowledgment of their sovereignty and independence. By Joseph Buckminster, Junr. A.M. Published by request. [Portsmouth], M,DCC,LXXXIV. [1784].

  • Channing, Henry. The Consideration of Divine goodness an argument for religious gratitude and obedience. A Sermon, delivered at New-London, November 27, 1794. Being the day appointed by authority, for public Thanksgiving in the state of Connecticut. By Henry Channing, A.M. Pastor of the First Church in New-London. [Five lines of Scripture texts]. New-London [Conn.], M,DCC,XCIV. [1794].

  • Chauncy, Charles. A Discourse on 'the good news from a far country.' Deliver'd July 24th. A day of thanks-giving to Almighty God, throughout the province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England, on occasion of the repeal of the Stamp-Act; appointed by His Excellency, the governor of said province, at the desire of it's House of Representatives, with the advice of His Majesty's Council. By Charles Chauncy, D.D. a Pastor of the First Church in Boston. Boston: N.E., MDCCLXVI. [1766].

  • George Cheever. The Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, in New England, in 1620: reprinted from the original volume: with Historical and local illustrations. New York, 1848. 370 pp. Includes a reprint of the original t.p.: A relation or iournall of the beginning and proceedings of the English plantation setled at Plimoth in New England, by certaine English aduenturers both merchants and others ... London, Printed for I. Bellamie, and are to be sold at his shop at the two greyhounds in Cornhill neere the Royall exchange. 1622./ The main part of the narrative was probably written by William Bradford and Edward Winslow. G. Mourt (George Morton?) by whose name the relation is commonly known, seems to have had no other connection with it than that of writing the preface and giving the book to the press. -- Cf. Chronicles of the Pilgrim fathers / A. Young. Boston, 1841. p. [109]-249.

  • Colman, Benjamin, 1673-1747. A Sermon preach'd at Boston in New-England on Thursday the 23d. of August, 1716. Being the day of publick thanksgiving, for the suppression of the late vile and traiterous rebellion in Great Britain. Boston, 1716. 27 pp.

  • Cumings, Henry, 1739-1823. A Sermon, preached in Billerica, on the 23d of November, 1775. Being the day appointed by civil authority, for a public thanksgiving throughout. Massachusetts-Bay: Worcester, [1776]. 29 pp.
  • Cumings, Henry, 1739-1823. A Thanksgiving Sermon preached at Billerica, November 27. 1766. By Henry Cumings, A.M. Pastor of the church there. [Two lines from David]. Boston: N.E., MDCCLXVII. [1767].

  • Cumings, Henry, 1739-1823. A Sermon preached in Billerica, December 11, 1783, the day recommended by Congress to all the states, to be observed as a day of public Thanksgiving, and appointed to be observed accordingly, throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, by the authority of the same. By Henry Cumings, A.M. Pastor of the church there. Boston, 1784.

  • Cumings, Henry, 1739-1823. A Sermon preached at Billerica, December 15, 1796, being the day appointed by authority, to be observed throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as a day of public praise and Thanksgiving. By Henry Cumings, A.M. Pastor of the church there. [Boston], MDCCXCVII. [1797].

  • Cumings, Henry, 1739-1823. A Sermon preached at Billerica, November 29, 1798, being the day of the anniversary Thanksgiving throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By Henry Cumings, A.M. Pastor of the church in said town. [Boston], MDCCXCVIII. [1798].

  • Dana, Joseph. A Sermon, delivered February 19, 1795, being a day of general Thanksgiving, throughout the United States of America. By Joseph Dana, A.M. Pastor of the South Church in Ipswich. [Newburyport], 1795.

  • Dawson, Benjamin. The Benefits of civil government, a ground of praise to God. A Sermon, preached on occasion of the late general Thanksgiving, for the restoration of His Majesty's health, April 23, 1789. By Benjamin Dawson, L.L.D. Rector of Burgh, in Suffolk. Ipswich, 1789.

  • Dexter, Samuel, 1700-1755. Our fathers God, the hope of posterity. Some serious thoughts on the foundation, rise and growth of the settlements in New England; with a view to the edification of the present, and the instruction, and admonition of future generations. A Discourse delivered at Dedham, on the day of publick Thanksgiving, Nov. 23. 1738. Upon the conclusion of the first century, since a church of Christ was gathered in that place. By Samuel Dexter, V.D.M. The second edition. [Three lines of Scripture texts]. Boston, MDCCXCVI. [1796]. 54 pp.

  • Dexter, Samuel, 1700-1755. Our Fathers God, the hope of posterity. Some serious thoughts on the foundation, rise and growth of the settlements in New England; with a view to the edification of the present, and the instruction, and admonition of future generations. A discourse delivered at Dedham, on the day of publick thanksgiving, Nov. 23. 1738. Upon the conclusion of the first century, since a church of Christ was gathered in that place. By Samuel Dexter, V.D.M. The second edition. [Three lines of Scripture texts]. Boston, MDCCXCVI. [1796]. 54 pp.
  • Dwight, Timothy, 1752-1817. The Nature and Danger of Infidel Philosophy, exhibited in two discourses, addressed to the candidates for the baccalaureate, in Yale College. New Haven: 1799. 95 pp. Contains 12 sermons preached in New England, on special occassions, including Fourth of July and Thanksgiving. Also includes a funeral sermon on the death of George Washington.

  • Eaton, Peter. A Sermon, preached at Boxford, November 28, 1799. The day of the anniversary Thanksgiving in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By Peter Eaton, A.M. Minister of a church in said town. Haverhill [Mass.], --Dec. 1799.

  • Eliot, Andrew. A Sermon preached October 25th. 1759. Being a day of public Thanksgiving appointed by authority, for the success of the British arms this year; especially in the reduction of Quebec, the capital of Canada. By Andrew Eliot, M.A. Pastor of the New-North Church in Boston. Boston, M,DCC,LIX. [1759].

  • Eliot, John. A Sermon, delivered on the day of annual Thanksgiving, November 20, 1794. By John Eliot, A.M. Pastor of the New-North Church, in Boston. [Boston], MDCCXCIV. [1794].

  • Emmons, Nathanael. National peace the source of national prosperity. A Sermon delivered at Franklin, on the day of annual Thanksgiving, December 15th, MDCCXCVI. By Nathanael Emmons, A.M. Pastor of the church in Franklin. Printed at Worcester [Mass.], MDCCXCVII. [1797].

  • Edward Everett. Bunker Hill Monument Association. Reverend Sir, The committee of the directors of the Bunker Hill Monument Association, regarding the exploits of our fathers on the memorable 17th of June, 1775 ... have thought that the day of the annual thanksgiving would furnish an appropriate occasion of presenting the objects of their association to the attention of their fellow citizens ... They have therefore directed me to furnish you with a copy of an address.

  • Fiske, Thaddeus. Thanksgiving and prayer for public rulers, recommended in a Discourse, delivered at the Second Parish, in Cambridge, February 19, 1795, being the day of national Thanksgiving in the United States. By Thaddeus Fiske, A.M. Pastor of the Second Church in Cambridge. Published by request of the hearers. Printed at Boston, MDCCXCV. [1795].

  • French, Jonathan, 1740-1809. A Sermon, delivered on the anniversary thanksgiving November 29, 1798: With some additions in the historical part. / By Jonathan French, A.M. Pastor of the South Church in Andover; Published by request. Andover [Mass.]: Printed by Ames and Parker, 1799. 31, [1] pp.; 21 cm. (8vo)

  • Frisbie, Levi. A Sermon delivered February 19, 1795, the day of public Thanksgiving through the United States. Recommended by the president. By Levi Frisbie, Pastor of the First Church in Ipswich. Published at the request of the hearers. Printed at Newburyport [Mass.], [1795].

  • Gannett, Ezra S. (Ezra Stiles), 1801-1871. Thanksgiving for the Union. A Discourse delivered in the Federal-Street Meetinghouse in Boston, on Thanksgiving-day, November 28, 1850. Boston, 1850. 22 pp. Disclaimer: Reputed to be Unitarian.

  • Gay, Ebenezer. The Devotions of God's people adjusted to the dispensations of his providence. A Sermon preached in the First Parish of Hingham, December 6, 1770. The day observed throughout the province as a day of public Thanksgiving and prayer. By Ebenezer Gay, A.M. Pastor of the First Church in Hingham. [Four lines of Scripture texts]. Boston, MCCLXXI. [i.e., 1771].

  • Gordon, William, 1728-1807. Mr. Gordon's Thanksgiving Discourse. A Discourse Preached December 15th, 1774, Being the Day Recommended by the Provincial Congress; and Afterwards at the Boston Lecture. Boston: Printed for, and sold by Thomas Leverett, in Corn-Hill, 1784. 31 pp. Text: Lamentations 3:22.

  • Gray, Robert, 1761-1822. A Discourse, delivered in Dover, November 15th, 1798, a day observed as an anniversary thanksgiving. / By Robert Gray, A.B. Pastor of the Church of Christ in Dover. Dover [N.H.]: Printed by Samuel Bragg, Jun. for the subscribers, [1798]. [2], 21, [1] p.; 21 cm. (8vo)

  • Green, Ashbel, 1762-1848. A Sermon, delivered in the Second Presbyterian Church in the city of Philadelphia, on the 19th of February, 1795. Being the day of general thanksgiving throughout the United States. By Ashbel Green, D.D. one of the Pastors of the aforesaid church. Philadelphia, March, 1795. 48 pp.

    "At his command empires rise and fall. He setteth up and pulleth down at his pleasure. He prospers or blasts a nation according to his sovereign will. In all respects we depend upon him as absolutely in this relation as in that of individuals. Shall we never, then, as a community, acknowledge our dependance and give him thanks for the distinguishing favours which he may have conferred on us? Is it not fit, is it not important, that in every relation which he hath instituted, which he sustains, and which he crowns with his kindness, we should confess his sovereignty, acknowledge his power, and praise his goodness? Yes, my brethren. We have a national character in support in our carriage and demeanour toward Almighty God, a character which he observes, and according to which he will treat us. The history of the whole world is a confirmation of this truth. The history of the nation which was governed by the author of our text illustrates it in a most striking manner: And it requires no gift of prophecy to foresee and foretell, that if we are not thankful to God as a people, he will withdraw his unnoticed benefits and teach us by adversity to enquire after him whom in our prosperity we had forgotten."

  • Holmes, Abiel. A Sermon, on the freedom and happiness of America; preached at Cambridge, February 19, 1795, the day appointed by the president of the United States for a national Thanksgiving. By Abiel Holmes, A.M. Pastor of the First Church in Cambridge. [Boston], 1795.

  • Hyde, Alvan. A Sermon delivered at Lee, December 15th, 1796, being the day appointed by authority for a public Thanksgiving. By Alvan Hyde, A.M. Pastor of the church in Lee. Stockbridge [Mass.], April, 1797.

  • Inglis, David, 1823-1878. Righteousness exalteth a nation, a thanksgiving sermon.. Hamilton Spectator Steam Press, 1866. 14 pp.

  • Lathrop, John, 1740-1816. A Discourse, Delivered in Boston, April 13, 1815, The Day of Thanksgiving Appointed by the President of the United States in Consequence of the Peace. Boston, Mass., J. W. Burditt, 1815. 27 pp. Text: 1 Chronicles 16:8-9. Also here.

  • Lathrop, Joseph, 1731-1820. A Sermon, preached in the First Parish in West-Springfield, December 14, MDCCLXXXVI,: being the day appointed by authority for a publick thanksgiving. / By Joseph Lathrop, A.M.; Published at the general desire of the hearers. Springfield, Mass.: Printed by John Russell, at his office, in Springfield, MDCCLXXXVII. [1787] 24 pp.; 19 cm. (4to)

  • Lathrop, Joseph, 1731-1820. National Happiness: illustrated in a sermon, delivered at West-Springfield, on the nineteenth of February, 1795, being a day of General Thanksgiving. Springfield, 1795. 17 pp.

  • Law, William, 1686-1761. A Sermon [on Tit. iii. 1] preach'd at Hazelingfield, in the county of Cambridge, on Tuesday, July 7. 1713. Being the day appointed by Her Majesty's Royal Proclamation for a Publick Thanksgiving for Her Majesty's general peace. London: R. Thurlbourne and sold by R. Knaplock, 1713. [4], 43 p. 20 cm.

  • Linn, William, 1752-1808. A Discourse, delivered on the 26th of November, 1795; being the day recommended by the governor of the state of New-York to be observed as a day of Thanksgiving and prayer, on account of the removal of an epidemic fever, and for other national blessings. By William Linn, D.D. one of the Ministers of the Dutch Reformed Church in the City of New-York. New-York, --1795--. iv, [1], 6-38, [2] pp.; 22 cm.

  • Lyman, Joseph. The Administrations of providence full of goodness and mercy. A Sermon, delivered at Hatfield, November 7th. A.D. 1793. Being the day of public Thanksgiving. By Joseph Lyman, A.M. Pastor of the church in Hatfield. [Two lines from Psalms]. Northampton [Mass.], M,DCC,XCIV. [1794].

  • M'Knight, John, 1754-1823. The Divine Goodness to the United States of America, particularly in the course of the last year. A Thanksgiving Sermon, preached in New-York, February 19, 1795. By John M'Knight, D.D. one of the Ministers of the United Presbyterian Congregations in the city of New-York. New-York, 1795. 23, [5] pp.; 21 cm.

  • Madison, James, 1749-1812. A Sermon, preached in the county of Botetourt, on the 13th of September [i.e. December], 1781, Being the day appointed by Congress to be observed with prayer and thanksgiving. Richmond: Printed by Nicolson & Prentis, opposite the prison., 1781. 19, [1] pp.: ill.

  • Madison, James, 1749-1812. Manifestations of the beneficence of Divine Providence towards America: A Discourse, delivered on Thursday the 19th of February, 1795, being the day recommended by the president of the United States, for general thanksgiving and prayer. / By Bishop Madison; Published at the request of the auditors. Richmond: Printed by Thomas Nicolson, 1795. 23, [1] pp.; 19 cm.

  • Marsh, John, c. 1783. A Discourse delivered at Wethersfield, December 11th, 1783: being a day of public thanksgiving, throughout the United States of America. Hartford, n.d. 20 pp.

  • Mason, John M. (John Mitchell). Mercy remembered in wrath. A Sermon, the substance of which was preached on the 19th of February, 1795, observed throughout the United States as a day of Thanksgiving and prayer. By John M. Mason, Pastor of the Scotch Presbyterian Church, in the city of New-York. New-York, M,DCC,XCV. [1795].

  • Mason, Thomas. A Sermon, delivered at Middlebury, Vermont; on occasion of the anniversary Thanksgiving, 1798. By Thomas Mason, A.B. of Princeton, Massachusetts; candidate for the Gospel ministry. [Two lines from Revelation]. Printed at Rutland, Vermont, 1799.

  • Mayhew, Jonathan, 1720-1766. Two discourses delivered October 25th. 1759. Being the day appointed by authority to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving, for the success of His Majesty's arms, more particularly in the reduction of Quebec, the capital of Canada. With an appendix, containing a brief account of two former expeditions against the city and country, which proved unsuccessful. By Jonathan Mayhew., Pastor of the West church in Boston. Boston, New England: Printed and sold by Richard Draper, in Newbury-street; Edes & Gill, in Queen-street; and Thomas & John Fleet, in Cornhill, 1759. 67 [12] pp. 23 cm.

  • Mayhew, Jonathan, 1720-1766. Two discourses delivered October 9th, 1760: Being the day appointed to be observed as a day of public thanksgiving for the success of His Majesty's arms, more especially in the intire [sic] reduction of Canada. / By Jonathan Mayhew, D.D. Pastor of the West-Church in Boston; [Three lines from Psalm II] Boston: Printed and sold by R. Draper, in Newbury-Street; Edes and Gill, in Queen-Street; and T. & J. Fleet, in Cornhill, 1760. 69, [3] pp.; 21 cm. (8vo)

  • Mayhew, Jonathan, 1720-1766. Two sermons on the nature, extent and perfection of the divine goodness. Delivered December 9. 1762. Being the annual thanksgiving of the province, &c. On Psalm 145. 9. Published with some enlargements. By Jonathan Mayhew, D.D. Pastor of the West Church in Boston. Boston: N.E.: Printed and sold by D. and J. Kneeland, opposite to the probate-office, in Queen-Street, 1763. 91,[1]p.; 8^(0)
  • Mayhew, Jonathan, 1720-1766. The Snare Broken. A thanksgiving-discourse, preached at the desire of the West Church in Boston, N.E. Friday May 23, 1766. Occasioned by the repeal of the stamp-act. By Jonathan Mayhew, D.D. Pastor of said Church. (The second edition.) [Three lines from St. Paul]. viii, 52 p. 21 cm. (8vo)

  • McCrory, J. T., 1846-1923. Christianity and the Commonweal. Chicago Tribune, November 30, 1894, p. 8, Column B. This page includes other Thanksgiving coverage.

  • Morse, Jedidiah, 1761-1826. The present situation of other nations of the world, contrasted with our own. A sermon, delivered at Charlestown, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, February 19, 1795; being the day recommended by George Washington, President of the United States of America, for publick thanksgiving and prayer. Boston, 1795. 37 pp.

  • Morse, Jedidiah, 1761-1826. A Sermon, preached at Charlestown, November 29, 1798, on the anniversary thanksgiving in Massachusetts. With an appendix, designed to illustrate some parts of the discourse; exhibiting proofs of the early existence, progress, and deleterious effects of French intrigue and influence in the United States.. Boston, December, 1798-February, 1799.

  • Motives for thankfulness: A Sermon, preached in the county of Durham, on Thursday, November 29th. 1798, being the day appointed for a general Thanksgiving.

  • Murray, John. Jerubbaal, or Tyranny's grove destroyed, and the altar of liberty finished. A Discourse on America's Duty and danger, delivered at the Presbyterian Church in Newbury-Port, December 11, 1783. On occasion of the public Thanksgiving for peace. (Published by particular request.) By John Murray, A.M. Pastor of said church. Newbury-Port [Mass.], MDCCLXXXIV. [1784].

  • Murray, John. The Substance of a Thanksgiving Sermon, delivered at the Universal Meeting-House, in Boston, February 19, 1795. Published at the request of the hearers. By John Murray, Minister of the First Universal Church in Boston. [Four lines from Psalms]. Boston, 1795.

  • Osgood, David. A Discourse, delivered on the day of annual Thanksgiving, November 19, 1795. By David Osgood, A.M. Pastor of the church in Medford. [Boston], 1795.

  • Osgood, David. The Wonderful works of God are to be remembered. A Sermon, delivered on the day of annual Thanksgiving, November 20, 1794. By David Osgood, A.M. Pastor of the church in Medford. Published at the request of the hearers. The third edition. [Boston], MDCCXCV. [1795].

  • Packard, Hezekiah. The plea of patriotism. A Sermon, preached in Chelmsford, on the day of general Thanksgiving, February 19, 1795. By Hezekiah Packard, A.M. Minister of Chelmsford. [Two lines of Scripture texts]. Boston, --1795.

  • Patten, William. Directions with regard to the improvement of temporal blessings. A Thanksgiving Sermon, delivered to the First Society in New-London, December 2d, 1784. By William Patten, A.M. [One line from The inspired preacher]. New-London [Conn.], [1785].

  • A Sermon, delivered to the First Religious Society in Roxbury, December 11, 1783: being the first day of public thanksgiving, in America, after the restoration of peace, and the ultimate acknowledgment of her independence. / By Eliphalet Porter, A.M.

  • Potter, Alonzo, 1800-1865. A Discourse delivered in St. Luke's Church, Philadelphia, November 23, 1848, being the day of public thanksgiving. Philadelphia [Pa.] : King & Baird, 1848. 16 pp.; 22 cm. Also here.

  • Prince, Thomas, 1687-1758. Extraordinary events the doings of God, and marvellous in pious eyes. Illustrated in a sermon at the South Church in Boston, N.E. On the general thanksgiving, Thursday, July 18, 1745. Occasion'd by taking the city of Louisbourg on the Isle of Cape-Breton, by New-England Soldiers, assisted by a British Squadron. By Thomas Prince. The Fourth edition. [London]: Boston, printed: London, reprinted; and sold by J. Lewis; and at the pamphlet shops in London and Westminster, 1746. 32 pp.

  • Prince, Thomas, 1687-1758. Mr. Prince's Thanksgiving Sermon on the salvations of God in 1746. In part set forth in a sermon at the South Church in Boston, Nov. 27, 1746. Being the day of the anniversary thanksgiving in the province of the Massachusetts Bay in N.E. Wherein the most remarkable salvations of the year past, both in Europe and North-America, as far as they are come to our knowledge, are briefly considered. [London], 1747. 34 pp.

  • Prince, Thomas, 1687-1758. The Natural and moral government and agency of God in causing droughts and rains: A Sermon at the South Church in Boston, Thursday Aug. 24. 1749. Being the day of the general thanksgiving, in the province of the Massachusetts, for the extraordinary reviving rains, after the most distressing drought which have been known among us in the memory of any living. / By Thomas Prince, A.M. and a Pastor of the said church. Second edition, Corrected by the author's own hand. [Two lines from Job] Boston: Printed and sold at Kneeland and Green's, in Queen-Street, 1751. 38 pp.

  • Pinto, Joseph Yesurun, b. 1729. The Form of prayer, which was performed at the Jews synagogue, in the city of New-York, on Thursday October 23, 1760; being the day appointed by Proclamation for a general Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for the reducing of Canada to His Majesty's dominions. / Composed by D.R. Joseph Yesurun Pinto, in the Hebrew language: and translated into English, by a friend to truth. New-York: Printed and sold by W. Weyman, at his new printing-office, in Broad-Street, not far from the Exchange, 1760. (Price 4d.) 7, [1] pp; 21 cm. (8vo)

  • Rowland, William F. (William Frederic), 1761-1843. A sermon, delivered in presence of His Excellency John Taylor Gilman, Esquire, governor, the Honorable the Council, Senate, and House of Representatives, of the state of New-Hampshire, convened at Exeter on the day of the anniversary election, June 2, 1796. By William F. Rowland, A.M. Pastor of the First Church in Exeter. 32 p. 24 cm. (8vo)

  • Sampson, Ezra. A Discourse delivered February 19, 1795; being the day of national Thanksgiving. By Ezra Sampson, Pastor of the Christian society in Plympton. Published at the request of a number of the hearers. [Boston], [1795].

  • Scott, Thomas, 1747-1821. The Reasonableness, Pleasure, and Benefit of National Thanksgiving. A sermon. preached Nov. 29, 1759, at Ipswich, in the county of Suffolk. Ipswich, [1759]. 18 pp.

  • Scott, Thomas, 1747-1821. Light shining out of darkness, or, An attempt to shew, that, with our causes for gratitude, in all other respects, circumstances attend even the Article in the Treaty of Peace, relating to the Slave Trade, which may animate our praises, and encourage our prayers and exertions a sermon on the day of publick thanksgiving, for the restoration of peace, July 7, 1814. London: Printed for the author by C. Baldwin, 1814. 38, [2] pp.; 21 cm.

  • Seixas, Gershom Mendes, 1745-1816. A Religious discourse delivered in the synagogue in this city, on Thursday the 26th November, 1789. Agreeable to the Proclamation of the President of the United States of America, to be observed as a day of Publick Thanksgiving and prayer. / By the Reverend Mr. Gershom Seixas. New-York: Printed by Archibald M'Lean, at Franklin's Head no. 41, Hanover-Square, M,DCC,LXXXIX. [1789] 16 pp.

  • Smith, Robert, 1723-1793. The Obligations of the confederate states of North America to praise God: two sermons: preached at Pequea, December 13, 1781, the day recommended by the honourable Congress to the several states, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving to God, for the various interpositions of his providence in their favour, during their contest with Great Britain, particularly those of the present year, crowned by the capture of Lord Cornwallis with his whole army. / By Robert Smith, A.M. Minister of the Gospel at Pequea. Philadelphia, 1782. 38 pp.

  • Sprague, William Buell, 1795-1876. An Historical discourse: delivered at West Springfield, December 2, 1824, the day of the annual Thanksgiving. Hartford, 1825. 90 pp.

  • Spring, Samuel. A Thanksgiving Sermon, preached November 29, 1798, by the Rev. Samuel Spring, A.M. Pastor of the North Congregational Society in Newburyport. Published by desire. Newburyport [Mass.], M.DCC.XCVIII. [1798].

  • Stillman, Samuel. Thoughts on the French Revolution. A Sermon, delivered November 20, 1794: being the day of annual Thanksgiving. By Samuel Stillman, D.D. Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Boston. Boston, 1795.

  • Story, Isaac. A Discourse, delivered February 15, 1795, at the request of the proprietor's committee; as preparatory to the collection, on the national Thanksgiving, the Thursday following, for the benefit of our American brethren in captivity at Algiers. By Isaac Story, A.M. Pastor o the Second Congregational Society in Marblehead. [Four lines of verse]. [Salem, Mass.], MDCCXCV. [1795].

  • Strong, Jonathan. A Sermon delivered on the day of annual Thanksgiving, November 19, 1795. By Jonathan Strong, A.M. Pastor of the church in Randolph. Published by desire of the hearers. Boston, [1795].

  • Strong, Nathan, 1748-1816. The Agency and providence of God acknowledged, in the preservation of the American states. A sermon preached at the annual Thanksgiving, December 7th, 1780. / By Nathan Strong, Pastor of the First Church of Christ in Hartford. Published by desire of the hearers. Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, 1780. 24 pp.; 18 cm. (4to)

  • Strong, Nathan, 1748-1816. A Sermon, preached at the annual thanksgiving, November 16th, 1797. Hartford: Printed by Hudson & Goodwin., 1797. 16 pp.; 21 cm. (8vo)

  • Strong, Nathan, 1748-1816. Political Instruction from the Prophecies of God's word a sermon, preached on the state thanksgiving, November 29, 1798. [New York]: Hartford, printed: New-York, re-printed by G. Forman, for C. Davis, 1799. 24 pp.; 21 cm. (8vo)

  • Strong, Nathan, 1748-1816. A Thanksgiving Sermon, delivered November 27th, 1800. Published by desire of the hearers. Hartford: Printed by Hudson and Goodwin, 1800. 18, [2] pp.; 24 cm. (8vo)
    "To preserve their civil and religious freedom, was a principal motive, with our forefathers, to transmigrate a great ocean and settle in a wilderness. they found the object they sought, though in a place then dreary and uncultivated.--They joyfully embraced and welcomed the freedom they had found, and giving themselves up to contentment with the hardy fare of a new settlement in the wilderness, they erected the temple of civil and religious freedom, and with their prayers consecreated it to divine preservation, and the honor of Heaven, and transmitted it as the best partrimony to their dear children.--We have received the dear bought possession entire."

  • Townsend, Jonathan. Sorrow turned into joy. A Sermon deliver'd at Medfield, October 25. 1759. Being a day of public acknowledgement of the smiles of heaven upon the British arms in America: more especially in the reduction of Quebec. By Jonathan Townsend, A.M. Pastor of the church in Medfield [Four lines from Psalms]. Boston, M,DCC,LX. [1760].

  • Trumbull, Benjamin, 1735-1820. God is to be praised for the glory of his majesty, and for his mighty works: A Sermon, delivered at North-Haven, December 11, 1783. The day appointed by the United States for a general thanksgiving on account of the peace concluded with Great-Britain. New-Haven, 1784. 35 pp. Also here

    EQUALLY illustrious have been the exertions of providence in behalf of America, from the very commencement of the late war to this day. Tho these only may it be ascribed, that the designs and plots of our enemies were so seasonably and providentially made known to us, from time to time, in the first stages of the war, to our great advantage: That the enemy suffered such uncommon slaughter in some of the first battles*, which damped their spirits, and kept them in a measure inactive the rest of the year, and gave time for the country to make more effectual provision for her own defence;--That a spirit of union and resistance flew instantly, like a stream of electric fire, through the continent:--The the union increased and grew up into an happy establishment, in spite of all the art and opposition either of our open or secret enimies:--that General WASHINGTON, that prodigy of a man, was appointed to command the confederate armies; and that we were furnished with arms, ammunition and implements of war, even from our enemies, when we were in the greatest need of them, and the most important enterprises must have failed had it not been for those providential supp1ies*. A watchful providence was no less conspicuous in secreting, in a very remarkable manner, from our enemies, at particular times, our want of ammunition and our great weakness, which had they been known, we might at once have been wholly ruined: in that spirit of magnanimity and suffering patience which sustained us in the dark years of seventeen hundred seventy six, and seventy seven. We were now pressed with an army of towards sixty thousand men, aided by more than twenty thousand seamen in eighty men of war, with a still greater number of privateers, gallies and gun-boats, which were not less mischievious and distressing than their capital ships*. This tremendous military force, sufficient to have alarmed and spread terror through any kingdom upon earth, was commanded by the most accomplished generals and admirals Great-Britain could furnish from all Europe. If we may credit their own historians, this army was furnished with the finest and most numerous train of artillery, with which any one, of that number, ever was supupplied in the known world; and this was served by the most experienced and approved engineers which Europe could produce.

    WHAT but the mighty operations of providence inspired us with magnanimity and resolution to declare ourselves INDEPENDENT, and by one capital stroke to found the AMERICAN REPUBLIC, at the very time when the enemy with these mighty armaments spread our coasts, poured in their troops upon us, and shook the continent with their thunder? When the enemy were in full force, and at the highest tide of victory, our army was next to nothing. In face of this mighty force, it was to be raised, armed and disciplined. We feared, and our enemies were positive, that it never could be done. How did the excellent greatness and goodness of GOD appear in supporting us in this dreadful crisis? What else could have influenced the surprizing movements, and given the memorable victories of TRENTON and PRINCETON*, which snatched us from the jaws of destruction; I had almost said, raised us from the dead, giving life and joy to all America? The victory of Bennington, tbe defeat of the enemy at fort Stanwix, the capture of Bargoyne and the British army, at Saratoga, and the giving us a powerful and generous ally in one of the capital powers of Europe; the detection of Arnold's horrid conspiracy, the splendid victories, the judicious and almoft incredible marchs and efforts of General GREENE, by which the Carolinas were recovered to the States, and the glorious victory over the Earl Cornwallis, in Virginia, are among the mighty acts of HIM, who is excellent in greatness and wonderful in working.

    THE combining of so many circumstances and great events, as united their influence in the ever memorable victory of York, displayed the greatness, wisdom and almighty power of the Supreme Ruler. To nothing but the divine wisdom can we ascribe the joint counsels of a WASHINGTON and ROCHAMBEAU, in that singular effort of generalship, which deceived and astonished the British generals, and at once transplanted the confederate armies from the banks of the Hudson to York. None by H P., who sits king upon the floods, and holdeth the winds in his fists, could have ordered the arrival and movements of the French fleet, as to defeat the British, and co-operate with the combined armies in the reduction of our enemies. Who, but the Being that holds a sovereign inluence over the hearts of men, could inspire armies and generals of different nations with such union and magnanimity, as though all had been animated with one soul, to effect the glorious work before them? This quieted the southern States, afforded rest to many thousands of our brethren, who before lay down and rose up in fear and distress; gave strength and honour to America at home, friends, favour and glory in the kingdoms of Europe; dispirited our enemies and gave a finishing stroke to the war.

    * See document for statistics provided in footnotes.

  • Vinton, Alexander H., 1807-1881. Man's Rule and Christ's Reign. A Sermon, Preached on Thanksgiving Day, November 27th, 1862. New-York, J.A. Gray, printer, 1862. 26 pp.

  • Vinton, Alexander H., 1807-1881. The Mistakes of the Rebellion: A Sermon Preached on the National Thanksgiving Day, November 26th, 1863. New York: George F. Nesbitt & Co., 1863. 28 pp. Also here.

  • Vinton, Alexander H., 1807-1881. Cause for Thanksgiving: A Sermon Preached on the National Thanksgiving Day, November 24th, 1864. New-York: John A. Gray & Green, printers, stereotypers, and binders, 1864. [3], 4-24 p. ; 23 cm. Also here.

  • Vinton, Francis, 1809-1872. Thanksgiving Sermon Preached in Emmanuel Church, Brooklyn, on Thursday, Dec. 4, 1845: Being the Day Appointed by the Civil Authority as a Day of Public Thanksgiving. New York: Alexander V. Blake, 1845.

  • Ware, Henry, 1764-1845. Disclaimer: A founder of Unitarianism. The Continuance of peace and increasing prosperity a source of consolation and just cause of gratitude to the inhabitants of the United States. A Sermon, delivered February 19, 1795; being a day set apart by the president, for Thanksgiving and prayer through the United States. By Henry Ware, Pastor of a church in Hingham. [Four lines from David]. [Boston], 1795.

  • Wheelock, Eleazar, 1711-1779. Liberty of Conscience, or, No King but Christ, in his church: A Sermon, preached at Dartmouth-Hall, November 30th, 1775; being the day appointed by the Honourable Congress of the province of New-Hampshire, to be observed as a general thanksgiving throughout that province / by the Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, D.D. President of Dartmouth-College; [Three lines of Scripture texts] Hartford: Printed by Eben. Watson, near the Great-Bridge, [1776]. xi, [1], [13]-31, [1] pp.; 18 cm. (8vo)

  • White, William, 1748-1836. A Sermon on the reciprocal influence of civil policy and religious duty. Delivered in Christ Church, in the city of Philadelphia, on Thursday, the 19th of February, 1795, being a day of general thanksgiving. By William White, D.D. Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 36 pp. 19 cm. (8vo)

  • Woollcott, Alexander, 1887-1943. Woollcott's second reader New York: The Viking Press, 1937. x, 1056 p. 22 cm. Contents: Foreword, by Alexander Woollcott.--Preface to "All men are brothers", by Shih Nai-an.--The lady's maid's bell, by Edith Wharton.--Joe, by Gustav Eckstein.--A Christmas garland, by Max Beerbohm.--The portrait of M. M., by D. H. Lawrence.--Two friends, by Willa Cather.--Cakes and ale, or, The skeleton in the cupboard, by W. S. Maugham.--Boswell and the girl from Botany bay, by F. A. Pottle.--The golden age, by Kenneth Grahame.--Peter Rugg, the missing man, by William Austin.--My Aunt Daisy, by Albert Halper.--Three stories by Dorothy Parker: The little hours. Arrangement in black and white. The waltz.--Big two-hearted river, by Ernest Hemingway.--The self-help of G. J. Smith, by William Bolitho.--All kneeling, by Anne Parrish.--Whilomville stories, by Stephen Crane.--To the Reverend Dr. Hyde, by R. L. Stevenson.--Rab and his friends, by Dr. John Brown.--God and my father, by Clarence Day.--Thanksgiving Proclamation, by Governor W. L. Cross.

  • Worcester, Thomas, 1768-1831. A Thanksgiving sermon. Delivered November 12, 1795. By Thomas Worcester, V.D.M. Pastor of the Congregational Church in Salisbury.


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