Classic Works of Apologetics Online


Wace, Henry
(1836-1924)

. Principal of King's College London (1883-1897) and Dean of Canterbury (1903-1924). Read more about Wace here.

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Wakefield, Gilbert
(1756-1801)

English classical scholar. Read more about Wakefield here. Note: We have doubts about claims of Wakefield's Unitarianism.

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Walker, George
(1734?-1807)

Presbyterian minister and mathematician. Read more about Walker here.

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Walker, James Barr
(1805-1887)

Clergyman. Read more about Walker here.

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Wallace, Archer
(b. 1884)

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Wallace, J. Warner
(Fl. 21st Century)

Los Angeles County Homicide Detective, author, former atheist. Read about Wallace here and at Stand to Reason.

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Warburton, William
(1698-1779)

Bishop of Gloucester. Read more about Warburton here.

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Warden, John
(d. 1764)

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Wardlaw, Ralph
(1779-1853)

Scottish Presbyterian clergyman and writer. Slavery abolitionist. Read about Wardlaw here.

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Warfield, B. B. (Benjamin Breckinridge)
(1851-1921)

Biblical scholar. Read more about Warfield here.

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Warmstry, Thomas
(1610-1665)

Puritan cleric.

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Warneck, Gustav
(1834-1910)

German missiologist.

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Warren, Joseph
(17411-1775)

American doctor and patriot. Died at Battle of Bunker Hill. Read about Warren here and here.

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Warren, Mercy Otis
(1728?1814)

American author, historian and playwright. Read more about Warren here and here.

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Washington, President George
(1732-1799)

The First American President. Read more about Washington here.

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Washington, Martha
(1731-1802)

First "First lady." Read more about Martha Washington here.

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Waterland, Daniel
(1683-1740)

English theologian.

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Waters, William
(b. 1833)

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Watson, Richard
(1781-1833)

British theologian. Read more about Watson here.

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Watson, Richard
(1737-1816)

English divine. (TM): Richard Watson (1737-1816), not to be confused with the Methodist theologian of the same name, was an Anglican theologian and scholar. He was a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, was appointed a professor of chemistry and later of divinity at Trinity. From 1782 until his death, he served as the Bishop of Llandaff.

The Oxford biography says of him: "A student of mathematics before he turned his hand to chemistry, Watson came fresh to the study of religion on his appointment as regius professor of divinity in 1771. He then applied himself not to theology or patristics but to biblical study of the New Testament....In his six volumes of Theological Tracts (1785), which reprinted twenty-four extracts from nineteen writers for 'young persons of every denomination' (1.v), he included works by a number of dissenters, even some Unitarians, insisting that he 'did not at all consider the quarter from whence the matter was taken, but whether it was good, and suited to my purpose' (1.xix). His aim was to establish the truth of Christianity and defend his young readers 'from that contagion of Infidelity which is the disgrace of the age' (1.ix); his target was deists not dissenters...Twice in his career he came forward as a defender of the Christian faith: in 1776 his Apology for Christianity addressed Gibbon's sceptical account of the growth of Christianity in Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; twenty years later his Apology for the Bible (1796) responded to the second part of Thomas Paine's deist Age of Reason, published in 1795. While his rejoinder to Gibbon was relaxed and courteous that to Paine was urgent and anxious; the debate was no longer an intellectual exercise but a crucial defence of the political and social order."

Read more about Watson here.

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Wayland, Francis
(1796-1865)

American educator. Read more about Wayland here.

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Webb, John
(1687-1750)

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Webster, Daniel
(1782-1858)

American statesman. Read more about Webster here and here and here. Inscription by Mr. Webster for his monument:
"Lord, I believe; help Thou mine unbelief.
Philosophical argument, especially that drawn from the vastness of the universe in comparison with the apparent insignificance of this Globe, has sometimes shaken my reason for the faith that is in me; but my heart has assured, and reassured me, that the Gospel of Jesus Christ must be a Divine Reality.
The Sermon on the Mount cannot be a merely human production. This belief enters into the very depth of my conscience. The whole history of man proves it."

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Webster, Noah
(1758-1843)

Lexicographer. Read more about Noah Webster here and here.

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Webster, William
(1689-1758)

British clergyman.

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Wellman, Francis
(1854-1942)

Attorney.

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Wesley, John
(1703-1791)

Church of England cleric and theologian. Read about Wesley here and here.

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West, Gilbert
(1703-1756)

Author.

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West, Samuel
(1731-1807)

Clergyman. Read more about West here. Disclaimer: West taught doctrine that became Unitarianism.

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West, Stephen
(1735-1819)

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Westcott, Brooke Foss
(1825-1901)

Biblical scholar and bishop of Durham.

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Westminster Assembly

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Wharton, Charles Henry
(1748-1833)

Clergyman. Read more about Wharton here.

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Wharton, Francis
(1820-1889)

Legal writer. Read more about Whartonhere

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Wharton, Henry M.
(20th century)

Baptist minister.

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Whately, Richard
(1787-1863)

Anglican Archbishop of Dublin. Expert in logic and rhetoric. Read more about Whately here. Encyclopedia Britannica, 1911 edition: "While he was at St Alban Hall (1826) the work appeared which is perhaps most closely associated with his name - his treatise on Logic, originally contributed to the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana, in which he raised the study of the subject to a new level. It gave a great impetus to the study of logic throughout Great Britain."

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Wheeler, Everett Pepperrell
(1840-1925)

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Wheeler, Lee S.
(20th century)

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Wheelock, Eleaszar
(1711-1779)

American educator, clergyman and founder of Dartmouth College. Read more about Wheelock here and here.

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Whewell, William
(1794-1866)

British polymath. Read more about Whewell here.

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Whiston, William
(1667-1752)

English divine and mathematician. Read more about Whiston here. Disclaimer: Whiston is considered to be a proponent of Arianism.

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Whitaker, Nathaniel
(1732-1795)

New York clergyman. Read about Whitaker here.

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Whitby, Daniel
(1638-1726)

Church of England clergyman and author.

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White, Thomas
(1628-1698)

Bishop of Peterborough. Learn more about White here.

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White, William
(1748-1836)

Episcopal bishop serving Christ Church and St. Peter's Church in Philadelphia. Chaplain of the Continental Congress and later as chaplain to the U.S. Senate. Learn about White here and here

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Whitefield, George
(1714-1770)

Preacher. Read more about Whitefield here. and here.

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Whitefield, Henry
(1590/91-1657)

American minister.

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Whitman, Elnathan
(1709-1777)

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Whitworth, John F.
(20th century)

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Wigglesworth, Edward
(1693-1765)

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Wijnpersse, Dionysius van de
(1724-1808)

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Wilberforce, William
(1759-1833)

British philanthropist, statesman and slavery abolitionist. Read more about Wilberforce here, here and here.

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Wilcox, Phineas Bacon
(1798-1863)

Read more about Wilcox here and here.

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Wilkins, George
(1785-1865)

Church of England clergyman. Read more about Wilkins here.

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Willard, Samuel
(1640-1707)

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Williams, Roger
(1604?-1683)

English theologian. Founder of Rhode Island. Read more about Williams here.

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Williams, Stephen Douglas
(fl. 20th Century)

Detroit lawyer.

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Williams, Thomas
(b. 1779)

Clergyman. Read more about Williams here.

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Williamson, James
(1735-1810)

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Willison, John
(1680-1750)

Church of Scotland minister.

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Wills, William
(d. 1860)

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Wilson, Daniel
(1778-1858)

Bishop of Calcutta. Read more about Wilson here.

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Wilson, James, M.A.
(1742-1798)

Statesman. Read more about Wilson here.

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Wilson, James
(1751-1799)

Presbyterian minister.

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Wilson, James P.
(1742-1798)

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Wilson, Captain James
(19th century)

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Wilson, Joseph D.
(b. 1840)

Clergyman. Read more about Wilson here

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Wilson, Thomas
(1663-1755)

Bishop. Read more about Wilson here and here

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Wilson, Thomas
(1747-1813)

Schoolmaster.

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Wilson, President Woodrow
(1856-1924)

President. Read more about President Wilson here and here and here

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Wines, E. C. (Enoch Cobb)
(1806-1879)

Read more about Wines here.

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Winks, J. F. (Joseph Foulkes)
(1792-1866)

Preacher. Publisher.

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Winslow, Edward
(1595-1655)

Plymouth colony founder. Read more about Winslow here.

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Winthrop, John
(1588-1649)

Puritan leader and governor of Massachusetts. Read more about Winthrop here.

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Winthrop, Robert Charles
(1809-1894)

Orator and statesman. Read more about Winthrop here.

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Wise, John
(1652-1725)

Clergyman. Read more about Wise here.

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Wiseman, Donald J. (John), O.B.E., M.A., F.S.A.

Modern Biblical scholar.

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Witherspoon, John
(1723-1794)

Reverend. Read more about Witherspoon here and here and here.
Ellis Sandoz, editor: ... "Witherspoon eschewed politics in America until 1774, but after that he steadily participated, directly and indirectly, in the leading events of the day. In 1776 he was elected to the Continental Congress in time to urge adoption of the Declaration of Independence and to be the only clergyman to sign it. To the assertion that America was not ripe for independence he retorted: 'In my judgment, sir, we are not only ripe, but rotting.'

"Witherspoon served intermittently in Congress until 1782 and was a member of over a hundred legislative committees, including two vital standing committees, the Board of War and the Committee on Foreign Affairs. In the latter role, he took a leading part in drawing up the instructions for the American peace commissioners who concluded the Treaty of Paris, which ended the war in September 1783. He later served in the New Jersey legislature and was a member of that state's ratifying convention for the Constitution in 1787.

"Witherspoon has been called the most influential professor in American history, not only because of his powerful writing and speaking style--and he was carefully attended to on all subjects, both here and abroad--but also because of his long tenure at Princeton. His teaching and the reforms he made there radiated his influence across the country. He trained not only a substantial segment of the leadership among Presbyterians but a number of political leaders as well. Nine of the fifty-five participants in the Federal Convention in 1787 were Princeton graduates, chief among them James Madison (who, among other things, spent an extra year studying Hebrew and philosophy with Witherspoon after his graduation in 1771). Moreover, his pupils included a president and a vice-president of the United States, twenty-one senators, twenty-nine representatives, fifty-six state legislators, and thirty-three judges, three of whom were appointed to the Supreme Court. During the Revolution, his pupils were everywhere in positions of command in the American forces.

"Witherspoon's The Dominion of Providence Over the Passions of Men caused a great stir when it was first preached in Princeton and published in Philadelphia in 1776, about a month before he was elected to the Continental Congress on June 22. He reminds his auditors that the sermon is his first address on political matters from the pulpit: ministers of the Gospel have more important business to attend to than secular crises, but, of course, liberty is more than a merely secular matter."

--Political Sermons of the American Founding Era: 1730-1805, 2 vols, Foreword by Ellis Sandoz (2nd ed. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1998). Vol. 1.

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